6df1dfd18b651fce1224fe0e127cf7e777981d34
[linux-3.10.git] / Documentation / DocBook / libata.tmpl
1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
2 <!DOCTYPE book PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.1.2//EN"
3         "http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.1.2/docbookx.dtd" []>
4
5 <book id="libataDevGuide">
6  <bookinfo>
7   <title>libATA Developer's Guide</title>
8   
9   <authorgroup>
10    <author>
11     <firstname>Jeff</firstname>
12     <surname>Garzik</surname>
13    </author>
14   </authorgroup>
15
16   <copyright>
17    <year>2003-2005</year>
18    <holder>Jeff Garzik</holder>
19   </copyright>
20
21   <legalnotice>
22    <para>
23    The contents of this file are subject to the Open
24    Software License version 1.1 that can be found at
25    <ulink url="http://www.opensource.org/licenses/osl-1.1.txt">http://www.opensource.org/licenses/osl-1.1.txt</ulink> and is included herein
26    by reference.
27    </para>
28
29    <para>
30    Alternatively, the contents of this file may be used under the terms
31    of the GNU General Public License version 2 (the "GPL") as distributed
32    in the kernel source COPYING file, in which case the provisions of
33    the GPL are applicable instead of the above.  If you wish to allow
34    the use of your version of this file only under the terms of the
35    GPL and not to allow others to use your version of this file under
36    the OSL, indicate your decision by deleting the provisions above and
37    replace them with the notice and other provisions required by the GPL.
38    If you do not delete the provisions above, a recipient may use your
39    version of this file under either the OSL or the GPL.
40    </para>
41
42   </legalnotice>
43  </bookinfo>
44
45 <toc></toc>
46
47   <chapter id="libataIntroduction">
48      <title>Introduction</title>
49   <para>
50   libATA is a library used inside the Linux kernel to support ATA host
51   controllers and devices.  libATA provides an ATA driver API, class
52   transports for ATA and ATAPI devices, and SCSI&lt;-&gt;ATA translation
53   for ATA devices according to the T10 SAT specification.
54   </para>
55   <para>
56   This Guide documents the libATA driver API, library functions, library
57   internals, and a couple sample ATA low-level drivers.
58   </para>
59   </chapter>
60
61   <chapter id="libataDriverApi">
62      <title>libata Driver API</title>
63      <para>
64      struct ata_port_operations is defined for every low-level libata
65      hardware driver, and it controls how the low-level driver
66      interfaces with the ATA and SCSI layers.
67      </para>
68      <para>
69      FIS-based drivers will hook into the system with ->qc_prep() and
70      ->qc_issue() high-level hooks.  Hardware which behaves in a manner
71      similar to PCI IDE hardware may utilize several generic helpers,
72      defining at a bare minimum the bus I/O addresses of the ATA shadow
73      register blocks.
74      </para>
75      <sect1>
76         <title>struct ata_port_operations</title>
77
78         <sect2><title>Disable ATA port</title>
79         <programlisting>
80 void (*port_disable) (struct ata_port *);
81         </programlisting>
82
83         <para>
84         Called from ata_bus_probe() and ata_bus_reset() error paths,
85         as well as when unregistering from the SCSI module (rmmod, hot
86         unplug).
87         </para>
88
89         </sect2>
90
91         <sect2><title>Post-IDENTIFY device configuration</title>
92         <programlisting>
93 void (*dev_config) (struct ata_port *, struct ata_device *);
94         </programlisting>
95
96         <para>
97         Called after IDENTIFY [PACKET] DEVICE is issued to each device
98         found.  Typically used to apply device-specific fixups prior to
99         issue of SET FEATURES - XFER MODE, and prior to operation.
100         </para>
101
102         </sect2>
103
104         <sect2><title>Set PIO/DMA mode</title>
105         <programlisting>
106 void (*set_piomode) (struct ata_port *, struct ata_device *);
107 void (*set_dmamode) (struct ata_port *, struct ata_device *);
108 void (*post_set_mode) (struct ata_port *ap);
109         </programlisting>
110
111         <para>
112         Hooks called prior to the issue of SET FEATURES - XFER MODE
113         command.  dev->pio_mode is guaranteed to be valid when
114         ->set_piomode() is called, and dev->dma_mode is guaranteed to be
115         valid when ->set_dmamode() is called.  ->post_set_mode() is
116         called unconditionally, after the SET FEATURES - XFER MODE
117         command completes successfully.
118         </para>
119
120         <para>
121         ->set_piomode() is always called (if present), but
122         ->set_dma_mode() is only called if DMA is possible.
123         </para>
124
125         </sect2>
126
127         <sect2><title>Taskfile read/write</title>
128         <programlisting>
129 void (*tf_load) (struct ata_port *ap, struct ata_taskfile *tf);
130 void (*tf_read) (struct ata_port *ap, struct ata_taskfile *tf);
131         </programlisting>
132
133         <para>
134         ->tf_load() is called to load the given taskfile into hardware
135         registers / DMA buffers.  ->tf_read() is called to read the
136         hardware registers / DMA buffers, to obtain the current set of
137         taskfile register values.
138         </para>
139
140         </sect2>
141
142         <sect2><title>ATA command execute</title>
143         <programlisting>
144 void (*exec_command)(struct ata_port *ap, struct ata_taskfile *tf);
145         </programlisting>
146
147         <para>
148         causes an ATA command, previously loaded with
149         ->tf_load(), to be initiated in hardware.
150         </para>
151
152         </sect2>
153
154         <sect2><title>Per-cmd ATAPI DMA capabilities filter</title>
155         <programlisting>
156 int (*check_atapi_dma) (struct ata_queued_cmd *qc);
157         </programlisting>
158
159         <para>
160 Allow low-level driver to filter ATA PACKET commands, returning a status
161 indicating whether or not it is OK to use DMA for the supplied PACKET
162 command.
163         </para>
164
165         </sect2>
166
167         <sect2><title>Read specific ATA shadow registers</title>
168         <programlisting>
169 u8   (*check_status)(struct ata_port *ap);
170 u8   (*check_altstatus)(struct ata_port *ap);
171 u8   (*check_err)(struct ata_port *ap);
172         </programlisting>
173
174         <para>
175         Reads the Status/AltStatus/Error ATA shadow register from
176         hardware.  On some hardware, reading the Status register has
177         the side effect of clearing the interrupt condition.
178         </para>
179
180         </sect2>
181
182         <sect2><title>Select ATA device on bus</title>
183         <programlisting>
184 void (*dev_select)(struct ata_port *ap, unsigned int device);
185         </programlisting>
186
187         <para>
188         Issues the low-level hardware command(s) that causes one of N
189         hardware devices to be considered 'selected' (active and
190         available for use) on the ATA bus.  This generally has no
191 meaning on FIS-based devices.
192         </para>
193
194         </sect2>
195
196         <sect2><title>Reset ATA bus</title>
197         <programlisting>
198 void (*phy_reset) (struct ata_port *ap);
199         </programlisting>
200
201         <para>
202         The very first step in the probe phase.  Actions vary depending
203         on the bus type, typically.  After waking up the device and probing
204         for device presence (PATA and SATA), typically a soft reset
205         (SRST) will be performed.  Drivers typically use the helper
206         functions ata_bus_reset() or sata_phy_reset() for this hook.
207         </para>
208
209         </sect2>
210
211         <sect2><title>Control PCI IDE BMDMA engine</title>
212         <programlisting>
213 void (*bmdma_setup) (struct ata_queued_cmd *qc);
214 void (*bmdma_start) (struct ata_queued_cmd *qc);
215 void (*bmdma_stop) (struct ata_port *ap);
216 u8   (*bmdma_status) (struct ata_port *ap);
217         </programlisting>
218
219         <para>
220 When setting up an IDE BMDMA transaction, these hooks arm
221 (->bmdma_setup), fire (->bmdma_start), and halt (->bmdma_stop)
222 the hardware's DMA engine.  ->bmdma_status is used to read the standard
223 PCI IDE DMA Status register.
224         </para>
225
226         <para>
227 These hooks are typically either no-ops, or simply not implemented, in
228 FIS-based drivers.
229         </para>
230
231         </sect2>
232
233         <sect2><title>High-level taskfile hooks</title>
234         <programlisting>
235 void (*qc_prep) (struct ata_queued_cmd *qc);
236 int (*qc_issue) (struct ata_queued_cmd *qc);
237         </programlisting>
238
239         <para>
240         Higher-level hooks, these two hooks can potentially supercede
241         several of the above taskfile/DMA engine hooks.  ->qc_prep is
242         called after the buffers have been DMA-mapped, and is typically
243         used to populate the hardware's DMA scatter-gather table.
244         Most drivers use the standard ata_qc_prep() helper function, but
245         more advanced drivers roll their own.
246         </para>
247         <para>
248         ->qc_issue is used to make a command active, once the hardware
249         and S/G tables have been prepared.  IDE BMDMA drivers use the
250         helper function ata_qc_issue_prot() for taskfile protocol-based
251         dispatch.  More advanced drivers implement their own ->qc_issue.
252         </para>
253
254         </sect2>
255
256         <sect2><title>Timeout (error) handling</title>
257         <programlisting>
258 void (*eng_timeout) (struct ata_port *ap);
259         </programlisting>
260
261         <para>
262 This is a high level error handling function, called from the
263 error handling thread, when a command times out.  Most newer
264 hardware will implement its own error handling code here.  IDE BMDMA
265 drivers may use the helper function ata_eng_timeout().
266         </para>
267
268         </sect2>
269
270         <sect2><title>Hardware interrupt handling</title>
271         <programlisting>
272 irqreturn_t (*irq_handler)(int, void *, struct pt_regs *);
273 void (*irq_clear) (struct ata_port *);
274         </programlisting>
275
276         <para>
277         ->irq_handler is the interrupt handling routine registered with
278         the system, by libata.  ->irq_clear is called during probe just
279         before the interrupt handler is registered, to be sure hardware
280         is quiet.
281         </para>
282
283         </sect2>
284
285         <sect2><title>SATA phy read/write</title>
286         <programlisting>
287 u32 (*scr_read) (struct ata_port *ap, unsigned int sc_reg);
288 void (*scr_write) (struct ata_port *ap, unsigned int sc_reg,
289                    u32 val);
290         </programlisting>
291
292         <para>
293         Read and write standard SATA phy registers.  Currently only used
294         if ->phy_reset hook called the sata_phy_reset() helper function.
295         </para>
296
297         </sect2>
298
299         <sect2><title>Init and shutdown</title>
300         <programlisting>
301 int (*port_start) (struct ata_port *ap);
302 void (*port_stop) (struct ata_port *ap);
303 void (*host_stop) (struct ata_host_set *host_set);
304         </programlisting>
305
306         <para>
307         ->port_start() is called just after the data structures for each
308         port are initialized.  Typically this is used to alloc per-port
309         DMA buffers / tables / rings, enable DMA engines, and similar
310         tasks.  
311         </para>
312         <para>
313         ->port_stop() is called after ->host_stop().  It's sole function
314         is to release DMA/memory resources, now that they are no longer
315         actively being used.
316         </para>
317         <para>
318         ->host_stop() is called after all ->port_stop() calls
319 have completed.  The hook must finalize hardware shutdown, release DMA
320 and other resources, etc.
321         </para>
322
323         </sect2>
324
325      </sect1>
326   </chapter>
327
328   <chapter id="libataExt">
329      <title>libata Library</title>
330 !Edrivers/scsi/libata-core.c
331   </chapter>
332
333   <chapter id="libataInt">
334      <title>libata Core Internals</title>
335 !Idrivers/scsi/libata-core.c
336   </chapter>
337
338   <chapter id="libataScsiInt">
339      <title>libata SCSI translation/emulation</title>
340 !Edrivers/scsi/libata-scsi.c
341 !Idrivers/scsi/libata-scsi.c
342   </chapter>
343
344   <chapter id="PiixInt">
345      <title>ata_piix Internals</title>
346 !Idrivers/scsi/ata_piix.c
347   </chapter>
348
349   <chapter id="SILInt">
350      <title>sata_sil Internals</title>
351 !Idrivers/scsi/sata_sil.c
352   </chapter>
353
354   <chapter id="libataThanks">
355      <title>Thanks</title>
356   <para>
357   The bulk of the ATA knowledge comes thanks to long conversations with
358   Andre Hedrick (www.linux-ide.org), and long hours pondering the ATA
359   and SCSI specifications.
360   </para>
361   <para>
362   Thanks to Alan Cox for pointing out similarities 
363   between SATA and SCSI, and in general for motivation to hack on
364   libata.
365   </para>
366   <para>
367   libata's device detection
368   method, ata_pio_devchk, and in general all the early probing was
369   based on extensive study of Hale Landis's probe/reset code in his
370   ATADRVR driver (www.ata-atapi.com).
371   </para>
372   </chapter>
373
374 </book>