Fixup rq_for_each_segment() indentation
[linux-2.6.git] / drivers / block / lguest_blk.c
1 /*D:400
2  * The Guest block driver
3  *
4  * This is a simple block driver, which appears as /dev/lgba, lgbb, lgbc etc.
5  * The mechanism is simple: we place the information about the request in the
6  * device page, then use SEND_DMA (containing the data for a write, or an empty
7  * "ping" DMA for a read).
8  :*/
9 /* Copyright 2006 Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> IBM Corporation
10  *
11  * This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
12  * it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
13  * the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
14  * (at your option) any later version.
15  *
16  * This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
17  * but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
18  * MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
19  * GNU General Public License for more details.
20  *
21  * You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
22  * along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
23  * Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307  USA
24  */
25 //#define DEBUG
26 #include <linux/init.h>
27 #include <linux/types.h>
28 #include <linux/blkdev.h>
29 #include <linux/interrupt.h>
30 #include <linux/lguest_bus.h>
31
32 static char next_block_index = 'a';
33
34 /*D:420 Here is the structure which holds all the information we need about
35  * each Guest block device.
36  *
37  * I'm sure at this stage, you're wondering "hey, where was the adventure I was
38  * promised?" and thinking "Rusty sucks, I shall say nasty things about him on
39  * my blog".  I think Real adventures have boring bits, too, and you're in the
40  * middle of one.  But it gets better.  Just not quite yet. */
41 struct blockdev
42 {
43         /* The block queue infrastructure wants a spinlock: it is held while it
44          * calls our block request function.  We grab it in our interrupt
45          * handler so the responses don't mess with new requests. */
46         spinlock_t lock;
47
48         /* The disk structure registered with kernel. */
49         struct gendisk *disk;
50
51         /* The major device number for this disk, and the interrupt.  We only
52          * really keep them here for completeness; we'd need them if we
53          * supported device unplugging. */
54         int major;
55         int irq;
56
57         /* The physical address of this device's memory page */
58         unsigned long phys_addr;
59         /* The mapped memory page for convenient acces. */
60         struct lguest_block_page *lb_page;
61
62         /* We only have a single request outstanding at a time: this is it. */
63         struct lguest_dma dma;
64         struct request *req;
65 };
66
67 /*D:495 We originally used end_request() throughout the driver, but it turns
68  * out that end_request() is deprecated, and doesn't actually end the request
69  * (which seems like a good reason to deprecate it!).  It simply ends the first
70  * bio.  So if we had 3 bios in a "struct request" we would do all 3,
71  * end_request(), do 2, end_request(), do 1 and end_request(): twice as much
72  * work as we needed to do.
73  *
74  * This reinforced to me that I do not understand the block layer.
75  *
76  * Nonetheless, Jens Axboe gave me this nice helper to end all chunks of a
77  * request.  This improved disk speed by 130%. */
78 static void end_entire_request(struct request *req, int uptodate)
79 {
80         if (end_that_request_first(req, uptodate, req->hard_nr_sectors))
81                 BUG();
82         add_disk_randomness(req->rq_disk);
83         blkdev_dequeue_request(req);
84         end_that_request_last(req, uptodate);
85 }
86
87 /* I'm told there are only two stories in the world worth telling: love and
88  * hate.  So there used to be a love scene here like this:
89  *
90  *  Launcher:   We could make beautiful I/O together, you and I.
91  *  Guest:      My, that's a big disk!
92  *
93  * Unfortunately, it was just too raunchy for our otherwise-gentle tale. */
94
95 /*D:490 This is the interrupt handler, called when a block read or write has
96  * been completed for us. */
97 static irqreturn_t lgb_irq(int irq, void *_bd)
98 {
99         /* We handed our "struct blockdev" as the argument to request_irq(), so
100          * it is passed through to us here.  This tells us which device we're
101          * dealing with in case we have more than one. */
102         struct blockdev *bd = _bd;
103         unsigned long flags;
104
105         /* We weren't doing anything?  Strange, but could happen if we shared
106          * interrupts (we don't!). */
107         if (!bd->req) {
108                 pr_debug("No work!\n");
109                 return IRQ_NONE;
110         }
111
112         /* Not done yet?  That's equally strange. */
113         if (!bd->lb_page->result) {
114                 pr_debug("No result!\n");
115                 return IRQ_NONE;
116         }
117
118         /* We have to grab the lock before ending the request. */
119         spin_lock_irqsave(&bd->lock, flags);
120         /* "result" is 1 for success, 2 for failure: end_entire_request() wants
121          * to know whether this succeeded or not. */
122         end_entire_request(bd->req, bd->lb_page->result == 1);
123         /* Clear out request, it's done. */
124         bd->req = NULL;
125         /* Reset incoming DMA for next time. */
126         bd->dma.used_len = 0;
127         /* Ready for more reads or writes */
128         blk_start_queue(bd->disk->queue);
129         spin_unlock_irqrestore(&bd->lock, flags);
130
131         /* The interrupt was for us, we dealt with it. */
132         return IRQ_HANDLED;
133 }
134
135 /*D:480 The block layer's "struct request" contains a number of "struct bio"s,
136  * each of which contains "struct bio_vec"s, each of which contains a page, an
137  * offset and a length.
138  *
139  * Fortunately there are iterators to help us walk through the "struct
140  * request".  Even more fortunately, there were plenty of places to steal the
141  * code from.  We pack the "struct request" into our "struct lguest_dma" and
142  * return the total length. */
143 static unsigned int req_to_dma(struct request *req, struct lguest_dma *dma)
144 {
145         unsigned int i = 0, len = 0;
146         struct req_iterator iter;
147         struct bio_vec *bvec;
148
149         rq_for_each_segment(bvec, req, iter) {
150                 /* We told the block layer not to give us too many. */
151                 BUG_ON(i == LGUEST_MAX_DMA_SECTIONS);
152                 /* If we had a zero-length segment, it would look like
153                  * the end of the data referred to by the "struct
154                  * lguest_dma", so make sure that doesn't happen. */
155                 BUG_ON(!bvec->bv_len);
156                 /* Convert page & offset to a physical address */
157                 dma->addr[i] = page_to_phys(bvec->bv_page)
158                         + bvec->bv_offset;
159                 dma->len[i] = bvec->bv_len;
160                 len += bvec->bv_len;
161                 i++;
162         }
163         /* If the array isn't full, we mark the end with a 0 length */
164         if (i < LGUEST_MAX_DMA_SECTIONS)
165                 dma->len[i] = 0;
166         return len;
167 }
168
169 /* This creates an empty DMA, useful for prodding the Host without sending data
170  * (ie. when we want to do a read) */
171 static void empty_dma(struct lguest_dma *dma)
172 {
173         dma->len[0] = 0;
174 }
175
176 /*D:470 Setting up a request is fairly easy: */
177 static void setup_req(struct blockdev *bd,
178                       int type, struct request *req, struct lguest_dma *dma)
179 {
180         /* The type is 1 (write) or 0 (read). */
181         bd->lb_page->type = type;
182         /* The sector on disk where the read or write starts. */
183         bd->lb_page->sector = req->sector;
184         /* The result is initialized to 0 (unfinished). */
185         bd->lb_page->result = 0;
186         /* The current request (so we can end it in the interrupt handler). */
187         bd->req = req;
188         /* The number of bytes: returned as a side-effect of req_to_dma(),
189          * which packs the block layer's "struct request" into our "struct
190          * lguest_dma" */
191         bd->lb_page->bytes = req_to_dma(req, dma);
192 }
193
194 /*D:450 Write is pretty straightforward: we pack the request into a "struct
195  * lguest_dma", then use SEND_DMA to send the request. */
196 static void do_write(struct blockdev *bd, struct request *req)
197 {
198         struct lguest_dma send;
199
200         pr_debug("lgb: WRITE sector %li\n", (long)req->sector);
201         setup_req(bd, 1, req, &send);
202
203         lguest_send_dma(bd->phys_addr, &send);
204 }
205
206 /* Read is similar to write, except we pack the request into our receive
207  * "struct lguest_dma" and send through an empty DMA just to tell the Host that
208  * there's a request pending. */
209 static void do_read(struct blockdev *bd, struct request *req)
210 {
211         struct lguest_dma ping;
212
213         pr_debug("lgb: READ sector %li\n", (long)req->sector);
214         setup_req(bd, 0, req, &bd->dma);
215
216         empty_dma(&ping);
217         lguest_send_dma(bd->phys_addr, &ping);
218 }
219
220 /*D:440 This where requests come in: we get handed the request queue and are
221  * expected to pull a "struct request" off it until we've finished them or
222  * we're waiting for a reply: */
223 static void do_lgb_request(struct request_queue *q)
224 {
225         struct blockdev *bd;
226         struct request *req;
227
228 again:
229         /* This sometimes returns NULL even on the very first time around.  I
230          * wonder if it's something to do with letting elves handle the request
231          * queue... */
232         req = elv_next_request(q);
233         if (!req)
234                 return;
235
236         /* We attached the struct blockdev to the disk: get it back */
237         bd = req->rq_disk->private_data;
238         /* Sometimes we get repeated requests after blk_stop_queue(), but we
239          * can only handle one at a time. */
240         if (bd->req)
241                 return;
242
243         /* We only do reads and writes: no tricky business! */
244         if (!blk_fs_request(req)) {
245                 pr_debug("Got non-command 0x%08x\n", req->cmd_type);
246                 req->errors++;
247                 end_entire_request(req, 0);
248                 goto again;
249         }
250
251         if (rq_data_dir(req) == WRITE)
252                 do_write(bd, req);
253         else
254                 do_read(bd, req);
255
256         /* We've put out the request, so stop any more coming in until we get
257          * an interrupt, which takes us to lgb_irq() to re-enable the queue. */
258         blk_stop_queue(q);
259 }
260
261 /*D:430 This is the "struct block_device_operations" we attach to the disk at
262  * the end of lguestblk_probe().  It doesn't seem to want much. */
263 static struct block_device_operations lguestblk_fops = {
264         .owner = THIS_MODULE,
265 };
266
267 /*D:425 Setting up a disk device seems to involve a lot of code.  I'm not sure
268  * quite why.  I do know that the IDE code sent two or three of the maintainers
269  * insane, perhaps this is the fringe of the same disease?
270  *
271  * As in the console code, the probe function gets handed the generic
272  * lguest_device from lguest_bus.c: */
273 static int lguestblk_probe(struct lguest_device *lgdev)
274 {
275         struct blockdev *bd;
276         int err;
277         int irqflags = IRQF_SHARED;
278
279         /* First we allocate our own "struct blockdev" and initialize the easy
280          * fields. */
281         bd = kmalloc(sizeof(*bd), GFP_KERNEL);
282         if (!bd)
283                 return -ENOMEM;
284
285         spin_lock_init(&bd->lock);
286         bd->irq = lgdev_irq(lgdev);
287         bd->req = NULL;
288         bd->dma.used_len = 0;
289         bd->dma.len[0] = 0;
290         /* The descriptor in the lguest_devices array provided by the Host
291          * gives the Guest the physical page number of the device's page. */
292         bd->phys_addr = (lguest_devices[lgdev->index].pfn << PAGE_SHIFT);
293
294         /* We use lguest_map() to get a pointer to the device page */
295         bd->lb_page = lguest_map(bd->phys_addr, 1);
296         if (!bd->lb_page) {
297                 err = -ENOMEM;
298                 goto out_free_bd;
299         }
300
301         /* We need a major device number: 0 means "assign one dynamically". */
302         bd->major = register_blkdev(0, "lguestblk");
303         if (bd->major < 0) {
304                 err = bd->major;
305                 goto out_unmap;
306         }
307
308         /* This allocates a "struct gendisk" where we pack all the information
309          * about the disk which the rest of Linux sees.  The argument is the
310          * number of minor devices desired: we need one minor for the main
311          * disk, and one for each partition.  Of course, we can't possibly know
312          * how many partitions are on the disk (add_disk does that).
313          */
314         bd->disk = alloc_disk(16);
315         if (!bd->disk) {
316                 err = -ENOMEM;
317                 goto out_unregister_blkdev;
318         }
319
320         /* Every disk needs a queue for requests to come in: we set up the
321          * queue with a callback function (the core of our driver) and the lock
322          * to use. */
323         bd->disk->queue = blk_init_queue(do_lgb_request, &bd->lock);
324         if (!bd->disk->queue) {
325                 err = -ENOMEM;
326                 goto out_put_disk;
327         }
328
329         /* We can only handle a certain number of pointers in our SEND_DMA
330          * call, so we set that with blk_queue_max_hw_segments().  This is not
331          * to be confused with blk_queue_max_phys_segments() of course!  I
332          * know, who could possibly confuse the two?
333          *
334          * Well, it's simple to tell them apart: this one seems to work and the
335          * other one didn't. */
336         blk_queue_max_hw_segments(bd->disk->queue, LGUEST_MAX_DMA_SECTIONS);
337
338         /* Due to technical limitations of our Host (and simple coding) we
339          * can't have a single buffer which crosses a page boundary.  Tell it
340          * here.  This means that our maximum request size is 16
341          * (LGUEST_MAX_DMA_SECTIONS) pages. */
342         blk_queue_segment_boundary(bd->disk->queue, PAGE_SIZE-1);
343
344         /* We name our disk: this becomes the device name when udev does its
345          * magic thing and creates the device node, such as /dev/lgba.
346          * next_block_index is a global which starts at 'a'.  Unfortunately
347          * this simple increment logic means that the 27th disk will be called
348          * "/dev/lgb{".  In that case, I recommend having at least 29 disks, so
349          * your /dev directory will be balanced. */
350         sprintf(bd->disk->disk_name, "lgb%c", next_block_index++);
351
352         /* We look to the device descriptor again to see if this device's
353          * interrupts are expected to be random.  If they are, we tell the irq
354          * subsystem.  At the moment this bit is always set. */
355         if (lguest_devices[lgdev->index].features & LGUEST_DEVICE_F_RANDOMNESS)
356                 irqflags |= IRQF_SAMPLE_RANDOM;
357
358         /* Now we have the name and irqflags, we can request the interrupt; we
359          * give it the "struct blockdev" we have set up to pass to lgb_irq()
360          * when there is an interrupt. */
361         err = request_irq(bd->irq, lgb_irq, irqflags, bd->disk->disk_name, bd);
362         if (err)
363                 goto out_cleanup_queue;
364
365         /* We bind our one-entry DMA pool to the key for this block device so
366          * the Host can reply to our requests.  The key is equal to the
367          * physical address of the device's page, which is conveniently
368          * unique. */
369         err = lguest_bind_dma(bd->phys_addr, &bd->dma, 1, bd->irq);
370         if (err)
371                 goto out_free_irq;
372
373         /* We finish our disk initialization and add the disk to the system. */
374         bd->disk->major = bd->major;
375         bd->disk->first_minor = 0;
376         bd->disk->private_data = bd;
377         bd->disk->fops = &lguestblk_fops;
378         /* This is initialized to the disk size by the Launcher. */
379         set_capacity(bd->disk, bd->lb_page->num_sectors);
380         add_disk(bd->disk);
381
382         printk(KERN_INFO "%s: device %i at major %d\n",
383                bd->disk->disk_name, lgdev->index, bd->major);
384
385         /* We don't need to keep the "struct blockdev" around, but if we ever
386          * implemented device removal, we'd need this. */
387         lgdev->private = bd;
388         return 0;
389
390 out_free_irq:
391         free_irq(bd->irq, bd);
392 out_cleanup_queue:
393         blk_cleanup_queue(bd->disk->queue);
394 out_put_disk:
395         put_disk(bd->disk);
396 out_unregister_blkdev:
397         unregister_blkdev(bd->major, "lguestblk");
398 out_unmap:
399         lguest_unmap(bd->lb_page);
400 out_free_bd:
401         kfree(bd);
402         return err;
403 }
404
405 /*D:410 The boilerplate code for registering the lguest block driver is just
406  * like the console: */
407 static struct lguest_driver lguestblk_drv = {
408         .name = "lguestblk",
409         .owner = THIS_MODULE,
410         .device_type = LGUEST_DEVICE_T_BLOCK,
411         .probe = lguestblk_probe,
412 };
413
414 static __init int lguestblk_init(void)
415 {
416         return register_lguest_driver(&lguestblk_drv);
417 }
418 module_init(lguestblk_init);
419
420 MODULE_DESCRIPTION("Lguest block driver");
421 MODULE_LICENSE("GPL");