d12f554e5f6a56119339828477278b2639961042
[linux-2.6.git] / arch / x86 / lguest / boot.c
1 /*P:010
2  * A hypervisor allows multiple Operating Systems to run on a single machine.
3  * To quote David Wheeler: "Any problem in computer science can be solved with
4  * another layer of indirection."
5  *
6  * We keep things simple in two ways.  First, we start with a normal Linux
7  * kernel and insert a module (lg.ko) which allows us to run other Linux
8  * kernels the same way we'd run processes.  We call the first kernel the Host,
9  * and the others the Guests.  The program which sets up and configures Guests
10  * (such as the example in Documentation/lguest/lguest.c) is called the
11  * Launcher.
12  *
13  * Secondly, we only run specially modified Guests, not normal kernels: setting
14  * CONFIG_LGUEST_GUEST to "y" compiles this file into the kernel so it knows
15  * how to be a Guest at boot time.  This means that you can use the same kernel
16  * you boot normally (ie. as a Host) as a Guest.
17  *
18  * These Guests know that they cannot do privileged operations, such as disable
19  * interrupts, and that they have to ask the Host to do such things explicitly.
20  * This file consists of all the replacements for such low-level native
21  * hardware operations: these special Guest versions call the Host.
22  *
23  * So how does the kernel know it's a Guest?  We'll see that later, but let's
24  * just say that we end up here where we replace the native functions various
25  * "paravirt" structures with our Guest versions, then boot like normal. :*/
26
27 /*
28  * Copyright (C) 2006, Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> IBM Corporation.
29  *
30  * This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
31  * it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
32  * the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
33  * (at your option) any later version.
34  *
35  * This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
36  * WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
37  * MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, GOOD TITLE or
38  * NON INFRINGEMENT.  See the GNU General Public License for more
39  * details.
40  *
41  * You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
42  * along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
43  * Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
44  */
45 #include <linux/kernel.h>
46 #include <linux/start_kernel.h>
47 #include <linux/string.h>
48 #include <linux/console.h>
49 #include <linux/screen_info.h>
50 #include <linux/irq.h>
51 #include <linux/interrupt.h>
52 #include <linux/clocksource.h>
53 #include <linux/clockchips.h>
54 #include <linux/lguest.h>
55 #include <linux/lguest_launcher.h>
56 #include <linux/virtio_console.h>
57 #include <linux/pm.h>
58 #include <asm/apic.h>
59 #include <asm/lguest.h>
60 #include <asm/paravirt.h>
61 #include <asm/param.h>
62 #include <asm/page.h>
63 #include <asm/pgtable.h>
64 #include <asm/desc.h>
65 #include <asm/setup.h>
66 #include <asm/e820.h>
67 #include <asm/mce.h>
68 #include <asm/io.h>
69 #include <asm/i387.h>
70 #include <asm/stackprotector.h>
71 #include <asm/reboot.h>         /* for struct machine_ops */
72
73 /*G:010 Welcome to the Guest!
74  *
75  * The Guest in our tale is a simple creature: identical to the Host but
76  * behaving in simplified but equivalent ways.  In particular, the Guest is the
77  * same kernel as the Host (or at least, built from the same source code). :*/
78
79 struct lguest_data lguest_data = {
80         .hcall_status = { [0 ... LHCALL_RING_SIZE-1] = 0xFF },
81         .noirq_start = (u32)lguest_noirq_start,
82         .noirq_end = (u32)lguest_noirq_end,
83         .kernel_address = PAGE_OFFSET,
84         .blocked_interrupts = { 1 }, /* Block timer interrupts */
85         .syscall_vec = SYSCALL_VECTOR,
86 };
87
88 /*G:037 async_hcall() is pretty simple: I'm quite proud of it really.  We have a
89  * ring buffer of stored hypercalls which the Host will run though next time we
90  * do a normal hypercall.  Each entry in the ring has 5 slots for the hypercall
91  * arguments, and a "hcall_status" word which is 0 if the call is ready to go,
92  * and 255 once the Host has finished with it.
93  *
94  * If we come around to a slot which hasn't been finished, then the table is
95  * full and we just make the hypercall directly.  This has the nice side
96  * effect of causing the Host to run all the stored calls in the ring buffer
97  * which empties it for next time! */
98 static void async_hcall(unsigned long call, unsigned long arg1,
99                         unsigned long arg2, unsigned long arg3,
100                         unsigned long arg4)
101 {
102         /* Note: This code assumes we're uniprocessor. */
103         static unsigned int next_call;
104         unsigned long flags;
105
106         /* Disable interrupts if not already disabled: we don't want an
107          * interrupt handler making a hypercall while we're already doing
108          * one! */
109         local_irq_save(flags);
110         if (lguest_data.hcall_status[next_call] != 0xFF) {
111                 /* Table full, so do normal hcall which will flush table. */
112                 kvm_hypercall4(call, arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4);
113         } else {
114                 lguest_data.hcalls[next_call].arg0 = call;
115                 lguest_data.hcalls[next_call].arg1 = arg1;
116                 lguest_data.hcalls[next_call].arg2 = arg2;
117                 lguest_data.hcalls[next_call].arg3 = arg3;
118                 lguest_data.hcalls[next_call].arg4 = arg4;
119                 /* Arguments must all be written before we mark it to go */
120                 wmb();
121                 lguest_data.hcall_status[next_call] = 0;
122                 if (++next_call == LHCALL_RING_SIZE)
123                         next_call = 0;
124         }
125         local_irq_restore(flags);
126 }
127
128 /*G:035 Notice the lazy_hcall() above, rather than hcall().  This is our first
129  * real optimization trick!
130  *
131  * When lazy_mode is set, it means we're allowed to defer all hypercalls and do
132  * them as a batch when lazy_mode is eventually turned off.  Because hypercalls
133  * are reasonably expensive, batching them up makes sense.  For example, a
134  * large munmap might update dozens of page table entries: that code calls
135  * paravirt_enter_lazy_mmu(), does the dozen updates, then calls
136  * lguest_leave_lazy_mode().
137  *
138  * So, when we're in lazy mode, we call async_hcall() to store the call for
139  * future processing: */
140 static void lazy_hcall1(unsigned long call,
141                        unsigned long arg1)
142 {
143         if (paravirt_get_lazy_mode() == PARAVIRT_LAZY_NONE)
144                 kvm_hypercall1(call, arg1);
145         else
146                 async_hcall(call, arg1, 0, 0, 0);
147 }
148
149 static void lazy_hcall2(unsigned long call,
150                        unsigned long arg1,
151                        unsigned long arg2)
152 {
153         if (paravirt_get_lazy_mode() == PARAVIRT_LAZY_NONE)
154                 kvm_hypercall2(call, arg1, arg2);
155         else
156                 async_hcall(call, arg1, arg2, 0, 0);
157 }
158
159 static void lazy_hcall3(unsigned long call,
160                        unsigned long arg1,
161                        unsigned long arg2,
162                        unsigned long arg3)
163 {
164         if (paravirt_get_lazy_mode() == PARAVIRT_LAZY_NONE)
165                 kvm_hypercall3(call, arg1, arg2, arg3);
166         else
167                 async_hcall(call, arg1, arg2, arg3, 0);
168 }
169
170 static void lazy_hcall4(unsigned long call,
171                        unsigned long arg1,
172                        unsigned long arg2,
173                        unsigned long arg3,
174                        unsigned long arg4)
175 {
176         if (paravirt_get_lazy_mode() == PARAVIRT_LAZY_NONE)
177                 kvm_hypercall4(call, arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4);
178         else
179                 async_hcall(call, arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4);
180 }
181
182 /* When lazy mode is turned off reset the per-cpu lazy mode variable and then
183  * issue the do-nothing hypercall to flush any stored calls. */
184 static void lguest_leave_lazy_mmu_mode(void)
185 {
186         kvm_hypercall0(LHCALL_FLUSH_ASYNC);
187         paravirt_leave_lazy_mmu();
188 }
189
190 static void lguest_end_context_switch(struct task_struct *next)
191 {
192         kvm_hypercall0(LHCALL_FLUSH_ASYNC);
193         paravirt_end_context_switch(next);
194 }
195
196 /*G:032
197  * After that diversion we return to our first native-instruction
198  * replacements: four functions for interrupt control.
199  *
200  * The simplest way of implementing these would be to have "turn interrupts
201  * off" and "turn interrupts on" hypercalls.  Unfortunately, this is too slow:
202  * these are by far the most commonly called functions of those we override.
203  *
204  * So instead we keep an "irq_enabled" field inside our "struct lguest_data",
205  * which the Guest can update with a single instruction.  The Host knows to
206  * check there before it tries to deliver an interrupt.
207  */
208
209 /* save_flags() is expected to return the processor state (ie. "flags").  The
210  * flags word contains all kind of stuff, but in practice Linux only cares
211  * about the interrupt flag.  Our "save_flags()" just returns that. */
212 static unsigned long save_fl(void)
213 {
214         return lguest_data.irq_enabled;
215 }
216
217 /* Interrupts go off... */
218 static void irq_disable(void)
219 {
220         lguest_data.irq_enabled = 0;
221 }
222
223 /* Let's pause a moment.  Remember how I said these are called so often?
224  * Jeremy Fitzhardinge optimized them so hard early in 2009 that he had to
225  * break some rules.  In particular, these functions are assumed to save their
226  * own registers if they need to: normal C functions assume they can trash the
227  * eax register.  To use normal C functions, we use
228  * PV_CALLEE_SAVE_REGS_THUNK(), which pushes %eax onto the stack, calls the
229  * C function, then restores it. */
230 PV_CALLEE_SAVE_REGS_THUNK(save_fl);
231 PV_CALLEE_SAVE_REGS_THUNK(irq_disable);
232 /*:*/
233
234 /* These are in i386_head.S */
235 extern void lg_irq_enable(void);
236 extern void lg_restore_fl(unsigned long flags);
237
238 /*M:003 Note that we don't check for outstanding interrupts when we re-enable
239  * them (or when we unmask an interrupt).  This seems to work for the moment,
240  * since interrupts are rare and we'll just get the interrupt on the next timer
241  * tick, but now we can run with CONFIG_NO_HZ, we should revisit this.  One way
242  * would be to put the "irq_enabled" field in a page by itself, and have the
243  * Host write-protect it when an interrupt comes in when irqs are disabled.
244  * There will then be a page fault as soon as interrupts are re-enabled.
245  *
246  * A better method is to implement soft interrupt disable generally for x86:
247  * instead of disabling interrupts, we set a flag.  If an interrupt does come
248  * in, we then disable them for real.  This is uncommon, so we could simply use
249  * a hypercall for interrupt control and not worry about efficiency. :*/
250
251 /*G:034
252  * The Interrupt Descriptor Table (IDT).
253  *
254  * The IDT tells the processor what to do when an interrupt comes in.  Each
255  * entry in the table is a 64-bit descriptor: this holds the privilege level,
256  * address of the handler, and... well, who cares?  The Guest just asks the
257  * Host to make the change anyway, because the Host controls the real IDT.
258  */
259 static void lguest_write_idt_entry(gate_desc *dt,
260                                    int entrynum, const gate_desc *g)
261 {
262         /* The gate_desc structure is 8 bytes long: we hand it to the Host in
263          * two 32-bit chunks.  The whole 32-bit kernel used to hand descriptors
264          * around like this; typesafety wasn't a big concern in Linux's early
265          * years. */
266         u32 *desc = (u32 *)g;
267         /* Keep the local copy up to date. */
268         native_write_idt_entry(dt, entrynum, g);
269         /* Tell Host about this new entry. */
270         kvm_hypercall3(LHCALL_LOAD_IDT_ENTRY, entrynum, desc[0], desc[1]);
271 }
272
273 /* Changing to a different IDT is very rare: we keep the IDT up-to-date every
274  * time it is written, so we can simply loop through all entries and tell the
275  * Host about them. */
276 static void lguest_load_idt(const struct desc_ptr *desc)
277 {
278         unsigned int i;
279         struct desc_struct *idt = (void *)desc->address;
280
281         for (i = 0; i < (desc->size+1)/8; i++)
282                 kvm_hypercall3(LHCALL_LOAD_IDT_ENTRY, i, idt[i].a, idt[i].b);
283 }
284
285 /*
286  * The Global Descriptor Table.
287  *
288  * The Intel architecture defines another table, called the Global Descriptor
289  * Table (GDT).  You tell the CPU where it is (and its size) using the "lgdt"
290  * instruction, and then several other instructions refer to entries in the
291  * table.  There are three entries which the Switcher needs, so the Host simply
292  * controls the entire thing and the Guest asks it to make changes using the
293  * LOAD_GDT hypercall.
294  *
295  * This is the exactly like the IDT code.
296  */
297 static void lguest_load_gdt(const struct desc_ptr *desc)
298 {
299         unsigned int i;
300         struct desc_struct *gdt = (void *)desc->address;
301
302         for (i = 0; i < (desc->size+1)/8; i++)
303                 kvm_hypercall3(LHCALL_LOAD_GDT_ENTRY, i, gdt[i].a, gdt[i].b);
304 }
305
306 /* For a single GDT entry which changes, we do the lazy thing: alter our GDT,
307  * then tell the Host to reload the entire thing.  This operation is so rare
308  * that this naive implementation is reasonable. */
309 static void lguest_write_gdt_entry(struct desc_struct *dt, int entrynum,
310                                    const void *desc, int type)
311 {
312         native_write_gdt_entry(dt, entrynum, desc, type);
313         /* Tell Host about this new entry. */
314         kvm_hypercall3(LHCALL_LOAD_GDT_ENTRY, entrynum,
315                        dt[entrynum].a, dt[entrynum].b);
316 }
317
318 /* OK, I lied.  There are three "thread local storage" GDT entries which change
319  * on every context switch (these three entries are how glibc implements
320  * __thread variables).  So we have a hypercall specifically for this case. */
321 static void lguest_load_tls(struct thread_struct *t, unsigned int cpu)
322 {
323         /* There's one problem which normal hardware doesn't have: the Host
324          * can't handle us removing entries we're currently using.  So we clear
325          * the GS register here: if it's needed it'll be reloaded anyway. */
326         lazy_load_gs(0);
327         lazy_hcall2(LHCALL_LOAD_TLS, __pa(&t->tls_array), cpu);
328 }
329
330 /*G:038 That's enough excitement for now, back to ploughing through each of
331  * the different pv_ops structures (we're about 1/3 of the way through).
332  *
333  * This is the Local Descriptor Table, another weird Intel thingy.  Linux only
334  * uses this for some strange applications like Wine.  We don't do anything
335  * here, so they'll get an informative and friendly Segmentation Fault. */
336 static void lguest_set_ldt(const void *addr, unsigned entries)
337 {
338 }
339
340 /* This loads a GDT entry into the "Task Register": that entry points to a
341  * structure called the Task State Segment.  Some comments scattered though the
342  * kernel code indicate that this used for task switching in ages past, along
343  * with blood sacrifice and astrology.
344  *
345  * Now there's nothing interesting in here that we don't get told elsewhere.
346  * But the native version uses the "ltr" instruction, which makes the Host
347  * complain to the Guest about a Segmentation Fault and it'll oops.  So we
348  * override the native version with a do-nothing version. */
349 static void lguest_load_tr_desc(void)
350 {
351 }
352
353 /* The "cpuid" instruction is a way of querying both the CPU identity
354  * (manufacturer, model, etc) and its features.  It was introduced before the
355  * Pentium in 1993 and keeps getting extended by both Intel, AMD and others.
356  * As you might imagine, after a decade and a half this treatment, it is now a
357  * giant ball of hair.  Its entry in the current Intel manual runs to 28 pages.
358  *
359  * This instruction even it has its own Wikipedia entry.  The Wikipedia entry
360  * has been translated into 4 languages.  I am not making this up!
361  *
362  * We could get funky here and identify ourselves as "GenuineLguest", but
363  * instead we just use the real "cpuid" instruction.  Then I pretty much turned
364  * off feature bits until the Guest booted.  (Don't say that: you'll damage
365  * lguest sales!)  Shut up, inner voice!  (Hey, just pointing out that this is
366  * hardly future proof.)  Noone's listening!  They don't like you anyway,
367  * parenthetic weirdo!
368  *
369  * Replacing the cpuid so we can turn features off is great for the kernel, but
370  * anyone (including userspace) can just use the raw "cpuid" instruction and
371  * the Host won't even notice since it isn't privileged.  So we try not to get
372  * too worked up about it. */
373 static void lguest_cpuid(unsigned int *ax, unsigned int *bx,
374                          unsigned int *cx, unsigned int *dx)
375 {
376         int function = *ax;
377
378         native_cpuid(ax, bx, cx, dx);
379         switch (function) {
380         case 1: /* Basic feature request. */
381                 /* We only allow kernel to see SSE3, CMPXCHG16B and SSSE3 */
382                 *cx &= 0x00002201;
383                 /* SSE, SSE2, FXSR, MMX, CMOV, CMPXCHG8B, TSC, FPU. */
384                 *dx &= 0x07808111;
385                 /* The Host can do a nice optimization if it knows that the
386                  * kernel mappings (addresses above 0xC0000000 or whatever
387                  * PAGE_OFFSET is set to) haven't changed.  But Linux calls
388                  * flush_tlb_user() for both user and kernel mappings unless
389                  * the Page Global Enable (PGE) feature bit is set. */
390                 *dx |= 0x00002000;
391                 /* We also lie, and say we're family id 5.  6 or greater
392                  * leads to a rdmsr in early_init_intel which we can't handle.
393                  * Family ID is returned as bits 8-12 in ax. */
394                 *ax &= 0xFFFFF0FF;
395                 *ax |= 0x00000500;
396                 break;
397         case 0x80000000:
398                 /* Futureproof this a little: if they ask how much extended
399                  * processor information there is, limit it to known fields. */
400                 if (*ax > 0x80000008)
401                         *ax = 0x80000008;
402                 break;
403         }
404 }
405
406 /* Intel has four control registers, imaginatively named cr0, cr2, cr3 and cr4.
407  * I assume there's a cr1, but it hasn't bothered us yet, so we'll not bother
408  * it.  The Host needs to know when the Guest wants to change them, so we have
409  * a whole series of functions like read_cr0() and write_cr0().
410  *
411  * We start with cr0.  cr0 allows you to turn on and off all kinds of basic
412  * features, but Linux only really cares about one: the horrifically-named Task
413  * Switched (TS) bit at bit 3 (ie. 8)
414  *
415  * What does the TS bit do?  Well, it causes the CPU to trap (interrupt 7) if
416  * the floating point unit is used.  Which allows us to restore FPU state
417  * lazily after a task switch, and Linux uses that gratefully, but wouldn't a
418  * name like "FPUTRAP bit" be a little less cryptic?
419  *
420  * We store cr0 locally because the Host never changes it.  The Guest sometimes
421  * wants to read it and we'd prefer not to bother the Host unnecessarily. */
422 static unsigned long current_cr0;
423 static void lguest_write_cr0(unsigned long val)
424 {
425         lazy_hcall1(LHCALL_TS, val & X86_CR0_TS);
426         current_cr0 = val;
427 }
428
429 static unsigned long lguest_read_cr0(void)
430 {
431         return current_cr0;
432 }
433
434 /* Intel provided a special instruction to clear the TS bit for people too cool
435  * to use write_cr0() to do it.  This "clts" instruction is faster, because all
436  * the vowels have been optimized out. */
437 static void lguest_clts(void)
438 {
439         lazy_hcall1(LHCALL_TS, 0);
440         current_cr0 &= ~X86_CR0_TS;
441 }
442
443 /* cr2 is the virtual address of the last page fault, which the Guest only ever
444  * reads.  The Host kindly writes this into our "struct lguest_data", so we
445  * just read it out of there. */
446 static unsigned long lguest_read_cr2(void)
447 {
448         return lguest_data.cr2;
449 }
450
451 /* See lguest_set_pte() below. */
452 static bool cr3_changed = false;
453
454 /* cr3 is the current toplevel pagetable page: the principle is the same as
455  * cr0.  Keep a local copy, and tell the Host when it changes.  The only
456  * difference is that our local copy is in lguest_data because the Host needs
457  * to set it upon our initial hypercall. */
458 static void lguest_write_cr3(unsigned long cr3)
459 {
460         lguest_data.pgdir = cr3;
461         lazy_hcall1(LHCALL_NEW_PGTABLE, cr3);
462         cr3_changed = true;
463 }
464
465 static unsigned long lguest_read_cr3(void)
466 {
467         return lguest_data.pgdir;
468 }
469
470 /* cr4 is used to enable and disable PGE, but we don't care. */
471 static unsigned long lguest_read_cr4(void)
472 {
473         return 0;
474 }
475
476 static void lguest_write_cr4(unsigned long val)
477 {
478 }
479
480 /*
481  * Page Table Handling.
482  *
483  * Now would be a good time to take a rest and grab a coffee or similarly
484  * relaxing stimulant.  The easy parts are behind us, and the trek gradually
485  * winds uphill from here.
486  *
487  * Quick refresher: memory is divided into "pages" of 4096 bytes each.  The CPU
488  * maps virtual addresses to physical addresses using "page tables".  We could
489  * use one huge index of 1 million entries: each address is 4 bytes, so that's
490  * 1024 pages just to hold the page tables.   But since most virtual addresses
491  * are unused, we use a two level index which saves space.  The cr3 register
492  * contains the physical address of the top level "page directory" page, which
493  * contains physical addresses of up to 1024 second-level pages.  Each of these
494  * second level pages contains up to 1024 physical addresses of actual pages,
495  * or Page Table Entries (PTEs).
496  *
497  * Here's a diagram, where arrows indicate physical addresses:
498  *
499  * cr3 ---> +---------+
500  *          |      --------->+---------+
501  *          |         |      | PADDR1  |
502  *        Top-level   |      | PADDR2  |
503  *        (PMD) page  |      |         |
504  *          |         |    Lower-level |
505  *          |         |    (PTE) page  |
506  *          |         |      |         |
507  *            ....               ....
508  *
509  * So to convert a virtual address to a physical address, we look up the top
510  * level, which points us to the second level, which gives us the physical
511  * address of that page.  If the top level entry was not present, or the second
512  * level entry was not present, then the virtual address is invalid (we
513  * say "the page was not mapped").
514  *
515  * Put another way, a 32-bit virtual address is divided up like so:
516  *
517  *  1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
518  * |<---- 10 bits ---->|<---- 10 bits ---->|<------ 12 bits ------>|
519  *    Index into top     Index into second      Offset within page
520  *  page directory page    pagetable page
521  *
522  * The kernel spends a lot of time changing both the top-level page directory
523  * and lower-level pagetable pages.  The Guest doesn't know physical addresses,
524  * so while it maintains these page tables exactly like normal, it also needs
525  * to keep the Host informed whenever it makes a change: the Host will create
526  * the real page tables based on the Guests'.
527  */
528
529 /* The Guest calls this to set a second-level entry (pte), ie. to map a page
530  * into a process' address space.  We set the entry then tell the Host the
531  * toplevel and address this corresponds to.  The Guest uses one pagetable per
532  * process, so we need to tell the Host which one we're changing (mm->pgd). */
533 static void lguest_pte_update(struct mm_struct *mm, unsigned long addr,
534                                pte_t *ptep)
535 {
536         lazy_hcall3(LHCALL_SET_PTE, __pa(mm->pgd), addr, ptep->pte_low);
537 }
538
539 static void lguest_set_pte_at(struct mm_struct *mm, unsigned long addr,
540                               pte_t *ptep, pte_t pteval)
541 {
542         native_set_pte(ptep, pteval);
543         lguest_pte_update(mm, addr, ptep);
544 }
545
546 /* The Guest calls this to set a top-level entry.  Again, we set the entry then
547  * tell the Host which top-level page we changed, and the index of the entry we
548  * changed. */
549 static void lguest_set_pmd(pmd_t *pmdp, pmd_t pmdval)
550 {
551         native_set_pmd(pmdp, pmdval);
552         lazy_hcall2(LHCALL_SET_PGD, __pa(pmdp) & PAGE_MASK,
553                    (__pa(pmdp) & (PAGE_SIZE - 1)) / sizeof(pmd_t));
554 }
555
556 /* There are a couple of legacy places where the kernel sets a PTE, but we
557  * don't know the top level any more.  This is useless for us, since we don't
558  * know which pagetable is changing or what address, so we just tell the Host
559  * to forget all of them.  Fortunately, this is very rare.
560  *
561  * ... except in early boot when the kernel sets up the initial pagetables,
562  * which makes booting astonishingly slow: 1.83 seconds!  So we don't even tell
563  * the Host anything changed until we've done the first page table switch,
564  * which brings boot back to 0.25 seconds. */
565 static void lguest_set_pte(pte_t *ptep, pte_t pteval)
566 {
567         native_set_pte(ptep, pteval);
568         if (cr3_changed)
569                 lazy_hcall1(LHCALL_FLUSH_TLB, 1);
570 }
571
572 /* Unfortunately for Lguest, the pv_mmu_ops for page tables were based on
573  * native page table operations.  On native hardware you can set a new page
574  * table entry whenever you want, but if you want to remove one you have to do
575  * a TLB flush (a TLB is a little cache of page table entries kept by the CPU).
576  *
577  * So the lguest_set_pte_at() and lguest_set_pmd() functions above are only
578  * called when a valid entry is written, not when it's removed (ie. marked not
579  * present).  Instead, this is where we come when the Guest wants to remove a
580  * page table entry: we tell the Host to set that entry to 0 (ie. the present
581  * bit is zero). */
582 static void lguest_flush_tlb_single(unsigned long addr)
583 {
584         /* Simply set it to zero: if it was not, it will fault back in. */
585         lazy_hcall3(LHCALL_SET_PTE, lguest_data.pgdir, addr, 0);
586 }
587
588 /* This is what happens after the Guest has removed a large number of entries.
589  * This tells the Host that any of the page table entries for userspace might
590  * have changed, ie. virtual addresses below PAGE_OFFSET. */
591 static void lguest_flush_tlb_user(void)
592 {
593         lazy_hcall1(LHCALL_FLUSH_TLB, 0);
594 }
595
596 /* This is called when the kernel page tables have changed.  That's not very
597  * common (unless the Guest is using highmem, which makes the Guest extremely
598  * slow), so it's worth separating this from the user flushing above. */
599 static void lguest_flush_tlb_kernel(void)
600 {
601         lazy_hcall1(LHCALL_FLUSH_TLB, 1);
602 }
603
604 /*
605  * The Unadvanced Programmable Interrupt Controller.
606  *
607  * This is an attempt to implement the simplest possible interrupt controller.
608  * I spent some time looking though routines like set_irq_chip_and_handler,
609  * set_irq_chip_and_handler_name, set_irq_chip_data and set_phasers_to_stun and
610  * I *think* this is as simple as it gets.
611  *
612  * We can tell the Host what interrupts we want blocked ready for using the
613  * lguest_data.interrupts bitmap, so disabling (aka "masking") them is as
614  * simple as setting a bit.  We don't actually "ack" interrupts as such, we
615  * just mask and unmask them.  I wonder if we should be cleverer?
616  */
617 static void disable_lguest_irq(unsigned int irq)
618 {
619         set_bit(irq, lguest_data.blocked_interrupts);
620 }
621
622 static void enable_lguest_irq(unsigned int irq)
623 {
624         clear_bit(irq, lguest_data.blocked_interrupts);
625 }
626
627 /* This structure describes the lguest IRQ controller. */
628 static struct irq_chip lguest_irq_controller = {
629         .name           = "lguest",
630         .mask           = disable_lguest_irq,
631         .mask_ack       = disable_lguest_irq,
632         .unmask         = enable_lguest_irq,
633 };
634
635 /* This sets up the Interrupt Descriptor Table (IDT) entry for each hardware
636  * interrupt (except 128, which is used for system calls), and then tells the
637  * Linux infrastructure that each interrupt is controlled by our level-based
638  * lguest interrupt controller. */
639 static void __init lguest_init_IRQ(void)
640 {
641         unsigned int i;
642
643         for (i = FIRST_EXTERNAL_VECTOR; i < NR_VECTORS; i++) {
644                 /* Some systems map "vectors" to interrupts weirdly.  Lguest has
645                  * a straightforward 1 to 1 mapping, so force that here. */
646                 __get_cpu_var(vector_irq)[i] = i - FIRST_EXTERNAL_VECTOR;
647                 if (i != SYSCALL_VECTOR)
648                         set_intr_gate(i, interrupt[i - FIRST_EXTERNAL_VECTOR]);
649         }
650         /* This call is required to set up for 4k stacks, where we have
651          * separate stacks for hard and soft interrupts. */
652         irq_ctx_init(smp_processor_id());
653 }
654
655 void lguest_setup_irq(unsigned int irq)
656 {
657         irq_to_desc_alloc_node(irq, 0);
658         set_irq_chip_and_handler_name(irq, &lguest_irq_controller,
659                                       handle_level_irq, "level");
660 }
661
662 /*
663  * Time.
664  *
665  * It would be far better for everyone if the Guest had its own clock, but
666  * until then the Host gives us the time on every interrupt.
667  */
668 static unsigned long lguest_get_wallclock(void)
669 {
670         return lguest_data.time.tv_sec;
671 }
672
673 /* The TSC is an Intel thing called the Time Stamp Counter.  The Host tells us
674  * what speed it runs at, or 0 if it's unusable as a reliable clock source.
675  * This matches what we want here: if we return 0 from this function, the x86
676  * TSC clock will give up and not register itself. */
677 static unsigned long lguest_tsc_khz(void)
678 {
679         return lguest_data.tsc_khz;
680 }
681
682 /* If we can't use the TSC, the kernel falls back to our lower-priority
683  * "lguest_clock", where we read the time value given to us by the Host. */
684 static cycle_t lguest_clock_read(struct clocksource *cs)
685 {
686         unsigned long sec, nsec;
687
688         /* Since the time is in two parts (seconds and nanoseconds), we risk
689          * reading it just as it's changing from 99 & 0.999999999 to 100 and 0,
690          * and getting 99 and 0.  As Linux tends to come apart under the stress
691          * of time travel, we must be careful: */
692         do {
693                 /* First we read the seconds part. */
694                 sec = lguest_data.time.tv_sec;
695                 /* This read memory barrier tells the compiler and the CPU that
696                  * this can't be reordered: we have to complete the above
697                  * before going on. */
698                 rmb();
699                 /* Now we read the nanoseconds part. */
700                 nsec = lguest_data.time.tv_nsec;
701                 /* Make sure we've done that. */
702                 rmb();
703                 /* Now if the seconds part has changed, try again. */
704         } while (unlikely(lguest_data.time.tv_sec != sec));
705
706         /* Our lguest clock is in real nanoseconds. */
707         return sec*1000000000ULL + nsec;
708 }
709
710 /* This is the fallback clocksource: lower priority than the TSC clocksource. */
711 static struct clocksource lguest_clock = {
712         .name           = "lguest",
713         .rating         = 200,
714         .read           = lguest_clock_read,
715         .mask           = CLOCKSOURCE_MASK(64),
716         .mult           = 1 << 22,
717         .shift          = 22,
718         .flags          = CLOCK_SOURCE_IS_CONTINUOUS,
719 };
720
721 /* We also need a "struct clock_event_device": Linux asks us to set it to go
722  * off some time in the future.  Actually, James Morris figured all this out, I
723  * just applied the patch. */
724 static int lguest_clockevent_set_next_event(unsigned long delta,
725                                            struct clock_event_device *evt)
726 {
727         /* FIXME: I don't think this can ever happen, but James tells me he had
728          * to put this code in.  Maybe we should remove it now.  Anyone? */
729         if (delta < LG_CLOCK_MIN_DELTA) {
730                 if (printk_ratelimit())
731                         printk(KERN_DEBUG "%s: small delta %lu ns\n",
732                                __func__, delta);
733                 return -ETIME;
734         }
735
736         /* Please wake us this far in the future. */
737         kvm_hypercall1(LHCALL_SET_CLOCKEVENT, delta);
738         return 0;
739 }
740
741 static void lguest_clockevent_set_mode(enum clock_event_mode mode,
742                                       struct clock_event_device *evt)
743 {
744         switch (mode) {
745         case CLOCK_EVT_MODE_UNUSED:
746         case CLOCK_EVT_MODE_SHUTDOWN:
747                 /* A 0 argument shuts the clock down. */
748                 kvm_hypercall0(LHCALL_SET_CLOCKEVENT);
749                 break;
750         case CLOCK_EVT_MODE_ONESHOT:
751                 /* This is what we expect. */
752                 break;
753         case CLOCK_EVT_MODE_PERIODIC:
754                 BUG();
755         case CLOCK_EVT_MODE_RESUME:
756                 break;
757         }
758 }
759
760 /* This describes our primitive timer chip. */
761 static struct clock_event_device lguest_clockevent = {
762         .name                   = "lguest",
763         .features               = CLOCK_EVT_FEAT_ONESHOT,
764         .set_next_event         = lguest_clockevent_set_next_event,
765         .set_mode               = lguest_clockevent_set_mode,
766         .rating                 = INT_MAX,
767         .mult                   = 1,
768         .shift                  = 0,
769         .min_delta_ns           = LG_CLOCK_MIN_DELTA,
770         .max_delta_ns           = LG_CLOCK_MAX_DELTA,
771 };
772
773 /* This is the Guest timer interrupt handler (hardware interrupt 0).  We just
774  * call the clockevent infrastructure and it does whatever needs doing. */
775 static void lguest_time_irq(unsigned int irq, struct irq_desc *desc)
776 {
777         unsigned long flags;
778
779         /* Don't interrupt us while this is running. */
780         local_irq_save(flags);
781         lguest_clockevent.event_handler(&lguest_clockevent);
782         local_irq_restore(flags);
783 }
784
785 /* At some point in the boot process, we get asked to set up our timing
786  * infrastructure.  The kernel doesn't expect timer interrupts before this, but
787  * we cleverly initialized the "blocked_interrupts" field of "struct
788  * lguest_data" so that timer interrupts were blocked until now. */
789 static void lguest_time_init(void)
790 {
791         /* Set up the timer interrupt (0) to go to our simple timer routine */
792         set_irq_handler(0, lguest_time_irq);
793
794         clocksource_register(&lguest_clock);
795
796         /* We can't set cpumask in the initializer: damn C limitations!  Set it
797          * here and register our timer device. */
798         lguest_clockevent.cpumask = cpumask_of(0);
799         clockevents_register_device(&lguest_clockevent);
800
801         /* Finally, we unblock the timer interrupt. */
802         enable_lguest_irq(0);
803 }
804
805 /*
806  * Miscellaneous bits and pieces.
807  *
808  * Here is an oddball collection of functions which the Guest needs for things
809  * to work.  They're pretty simple.
810  */
811
812 /* The Guest needs to tell the Host what stack it expects traps to use.  For
813  * native hardware, this is part of the Task State Segment mentioned above in
814  * lguest_load_tr_desc(), but to help hypervisors there's this special call.
815  *
816  * We tell the Host the segment we want to use (__KERNEL_DS is the kernel data
817  * segment), the privilege level (we're privilege level 1, the Host is 0 and
818  * will not tolerate us trying to use that), the stack pointer, and the number
819  * of pages in the stack. */
820 static void lguest_load_sp0(struct tss_struct *tss,
821                             struct thread_struct *thread)
822 {
823         lazy_hcall3(LHCALL_SET_STACK, __KERNEL_DS | 0x1, thread->sp0,
824                    THREAD_SIZE / PAGE_SIZE);
825 }
826
827 /* Let's just say, I wouldn't do debugging under a Guest. */
828 static void lguest_set_debugreg(int regno, unsigned long value)
829 {
830         /* FIXME: Implement */
831 }
832
833 /* There are times when the kernel wants to make sure that no memory writes are
834  * caught in the cache (that they've all reached real hardware devices).  This
835  * doesn't matter for the Guest which has virtual hardware.
836  *
837  * On the Pentium 4 and above, cpuid() indicates that the Cache Line Flush
838  * (clflush) instruction is available and the kernel uses that.  Otherwise, it
839  * uses the older "Write Back and Invalidate Cache" (wbinvd) instruction.
840  * Unlike clflush, wbinvd can only be run at privilege level 0.  So we can
841  * ignore clflush, but replace wbinvd.
842  */
843 static void lguest_wbinvd(void)
844 {
845 }
846
847 /* If the Guest expects to have an Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller,
848  * we play dumb by ignoring writes and returning 0 for reads.  So it's no
849  * longer Programmable nor Controlling anything, and I don't think 8 lines of
850  * code qualifies for Advanced.  It will also never interrupt anything.  It
851  * does, however, allow us to get through the Linux boot code. */
852 #ifdef CONFIG_X86_LOCAL_APIC
853 static void lguest_apic_write(u32 reg, u32 v)
854 {
855 }
856
857 static u32 lguest_apic_read(u32 reg)
858 {
859         return 0;
860 }
861
862 static u64 lguest_apic_icr_read(void)
863 {
864         return 0;
865 }
866
867 static void lguest_apic_icr_write(u32 low, u32 id)
868 {
869         /* Warn to see if there's any stray references */
870         WARN_ON(1);
871 }
872
873 static void lguest_apic_wait_icr_idle(void)
874 {
875         return;
876 }
877
878 static u32 lguest_apic_safe_wait_icr_idle(void)
879 {
880         return 0;
881 }
882
883 static void set_lguest_basic_apic_ops(void)
884 {
885         apic->read = lguest_apic_read;
886         apic->write = lguest_apic_write;
887         apic->icr_read = lguest_apic_icr_read;
888         apic->icr_write = lguest_apic_icr_write;
889         apic->wait_icr_idle = lguest_apic_wait_icr_idle;
890         apic->safe_wait_icr_idle = lguest_apic_safe_wait_icr_idle;
891 };
892 #endif
893
894 /* STOP!  Until an interrupt comes in. */
895 static void lguest_safe_halt(void)
896 {
897         kvm_hypercall0(LHCALL_HALT);
898 }
899
900 /* The SHUTDOWN hypercall takes a string to describe what's happening, and
901  * an argument which says whether this to restart (reboot) the Guest or not.
902  *
903  * Note that the Host always prefers that the Guest speak in physical addresses
904  * rather than virtual addresses, so we use __pa() here. */
905 static void lguest_power_off(void)
906 {
907         kvm_hypercall2(LHCALL_SHUTDOWN, __pa("Power down"),
908                                         LGUEST_SHUTDOWN_POWEROFF);
909 }
910
911 /*
912  * Panicing.
913  *
914  * Don't.  But if you did, this is what happens.
915  */
916 static int lguest_panic(struct notifier_block *nb, unsigned long l, void *p)
917 {
918         kvm_hypercall2(LHCALL_SHUTDOWN, __pa(p), LGUEST_SHUTDOWN_POWEROFF);
919         /* The hcall won't return, but to keep gcc happy, we're "done". */
920         return NOTIFY_DONE;
921 }
922
923 static struct notifier_block paniced = {
924         .notifier_call = lguest_panic
925 };
926
927 /* Setting up memory is fairly easy. */
928 static __init char *lguest_memory_setup(void)
929 {
930         /* We do this here and not earlier because lockcheck used to barf if we
931          * did it before start_kernel().  I think we fixed that, so it'd be
932          * nice to move it back to lguest_init.  Patch welcome... */
933         atomic_notifier_chain_register(&panic_notifier_list, &paniced);
934
935         /* The Linux bootloader header contains an "e820" memory map: the
936          * Launcher populated the first entry with our memory limit. */
937         e820_add_region(boot_params.e820_map[0].addr,
938                           boot_params.e820_map[0].size,
939                           boot_params.e820_map[0].type);
940
941         /* This string is for the boot messages. */
942         return "LGUEST";
943 }
944
945 /* We will eventually use the virtio console device to produce console output,
946  * but before that is set up we use LHCALL_NOTIFY on normal memory to produce
947  * console output. */
948 static __init int early_put_chars(u32 vtermno, const char *buf, int count)
949 {
950         char scratch[17];
951         unsigned int len = count;
952
953         /* We use a nul-terminated string, so we have to make a copy.  Icky,
954          * huh? */
955         if (len > sizeof(scratch) - 1)
956                 len = sizeof(scratch) - 1;
957         scratch[len] = '\0';
958         memcpy(scratch, buf, len);
959         kvm_hypercall1(LHCALL_NOTIFY, __pa(scratch));
960
961         /* This routine returns the number of bytes actually written. */
962         return len;
963 }
964
965 /* Rebooting also tells the Host we're finished, but the RESTART flag tells the
966  * Launcher to reboot us. */
967 static void lguest_restart(char *reason)
968 {
969         kvm_hypercall2(LHCALL_SHUTDOWN, __pa(reason), LGUEST_SHUTDOWN_RESTART);
970 }
971
972 /*G:050
973  * Patching (Powerfully Placating Performance Pedants)
974  *
975  * We have already seen that pv_ops structures let us replace simple native
976  * instructions with calls to the appropriate back end all throughout the
977  * kernel.  This allows the same kernel to run as a Guest and as a native
978  * kernel, but it's slow because of all the indirect branches.
979  *
980  * Remember that David Wheeler quote about "Any problem in computer science can
981  * be solved with another layer of indirection"?  The rest of that quote is
982  * "... But that usually will create another problem."  This is the first of
983  * those problems.
984  *
985  * Our current solution is to allow the paravirt back end to optionally patch
986  * over the indirect calls to replace them with something more efficient.  We
987  * patch two of the simplest of the most commonly called functions: disable
988  * interrupts and save interrupts.  We usually have 6 or 10 bytes to patch
989  * into: the Guest versions of these operations are small enough that we can
990  * fit comfortably.
991  *
992  * First we need assembly templates of each of the patchable Guest operations,
993  * and these are in i386_head.S. */
994
995 /*G:060 We construct a table from the assembler templates: */
996 static const struct lguest_insns
997 {
998         const char *start, *end;
999 } lguest_insns[] = {
1000         [PARAVIRT_PATCH(pv_irq_ops.irq_disable)] = { lgstart_cli, lgend_cli },
1001         [PARAVIRT_PATCH(pv_irq_ops.save_fl)] = { lgstart_pushf, lgend_pushf },
1002 };
1003
1004 /* Now our patch routine is fairly simple (based on the native one in
1005  * paravirt.c).  If we have a replacement, we copy it in and return how much of
1006  * the available space we used. */
1007 static unsigned lguest_patch(u8 type, u16 clobber, void *ibuf,
1008                              unsigned long addr, unsigned len)
1009 {
1010         unsigned int insn_len;
1011
1012         /* Don't do anything special if we don't have a replacement */
1013         if (type >= ARRAY_SIZE(lguest_insns) || !lguest_insns[type].start)
1014                 return paravirt_patch_default(type, clobber, ibuf, addr, len);
1015
1016         insn_len = lguest_insns[type].end - lguest_insns[type].start;
1017
1018         /* Similarly if we can't fit replacement (shouldn't happen, but let's
1019          * be thorough). */
1020         if (len < insn_len)
1021                 return paravirt_patch_default(type, clobber, ibuf, addr, len);
1022
1023         /* Copy in our instructions. */
1024         memcpy(ibuf, lguest_insns[type].start, insn_len);
1025         return insn_len;
1026 }
1027
1028 /*G:030 Once we get to lguest_init(), we know we're a Guest.  The various
1029  * pv_ops structures in the kernel provide points for (almost) every routine we
1030  * have to override to avoid privileged instructions. */
1031 __init void lguest_init(void)
1032 {
1033         /* We're under lguest, paravirt is enabled, and we're running at
1034          * privilege level 1, not 0 as normal. */
1035         pv_info.name = "lguest";
1036         pv_info.paravirt_enabled = 1;
1037         pv_info.kernel_rpl = 1;
1038
1039         /* We set up all the lguest overrides for sensitive operations.  These
1040          * are detailed with the operations themselves. */
1041
1042         /* interrupt-related operations */
1043         pv_irq_ops.init_IRQ = lguest_init_IRQ;
1044         pv_irq_ops.save_fl = PV_CALLEE_SAVE(save_fl);
1045         pv_irq_ops.restore_fl = __PV_IS_CALLEE_SAVE(lg_restore_fl);
1046         pv_irq_ops.irq_disable = PV_CALLEE_SAVE(irq_disable);
1047         pv_irq_ops.irq_enable = __PV_IS_CALLEE_SAVE(lg_irq_enable);
1048         pv_irq_ops.safe_halt = lguest_safe_halt;
1049
1050         /* init-time operations */
1051         pv_init_ops.memory_setup = lguest_memory_setup;
1052         pv_init_ops.patch = lguest_patch;
1053
1054         /* Intercepts of various cpu instructions */
1055         pv_cpu_ops.load_gdt = lguest_load_gdt;
1056         pv_cpu_ops.cpuid = lguest_cpuid;
1057         pv_cpu_ops.load_idt = lguest_load_idt;
1058         pv_cpu_ops.iret = lguest_iret;
1059         pv_cpu_ops.load_sp0 = lguest_load_sp0;
1060         pv_cpu_ops.load_tr_desc = lguest_load_tr_desc;
1061         pv_cpu_ops.set_ldt = lguest_set_ldt;
1062         pv_cpu_ops.load_tls = lguest_load_tls;
1063         pv_cpu_ops.set_debugreg = lguest_set_debugreg;
1064         pv_cpu_ops.clts = lguest_clts;
1065         pv_cpu_ops.read_cr0 = lguest_read_cr0;
1066         pv_cpu_ops.write_cr0 = lguest_write_cr0;
1067         pv_cpu_ops.read_cr4 = lguest_read_cr4;
1068         pv_cpu_ops.write_cr4 = lguest_write_cr4;
1069         pv_cpu_ops.write_gdt_entry = lguest_write_gdt_entry;
1070         pv_cpu_ops.write_idt_entry = lguest_write_idt_entry;
1071         pv_cpu_ops.wbinvd = lguest_wbinvd;
1072         pv_cpu_ops.start_context_switch = paravirt_start_context_switch;
1073         pv_cpu_ops.end_context_switch = lguest_end_context_switch;
1074
1075         /* pagetable management */
1076         pv_mmu_ops.write_cr3 = lguest_write_cr3;
1077         pv_mmu_ops.flush_tlb_user = lguest_flush_tlb_user;
1078         pv_mmu_ops.flush_tlb_single = lguest_flush_tlb_single;
1079         pv_mmu_ops.flush_tlb_kernel = lguest_flush_tlb_kernel;
1080         pv_mmu_ops.set_pte = lguest_set_pte;
1081         pv_mmu_ops.set_pte_at = lguest_set_pte_at;
1082         pv_mmu_ops.set_pmd = lguest_set_pmd;
1083         pv_mmu_ops.read_cr2 = lguest_read_cr2;
1084         pv_mmu_ops.read_cr3 = lguest_read_cr3;
1085         pv_mmu_ops.lazy_mode.enter = paravirt_enter_lazy_mmu;
1086         pv_mmu_ops.lazy_mode.leave = lguest_leave_lazy_mmu_mode;
1087         pv_mmu_ops.pte_update = lguest_pte_update;
1088         pv_mmu_ops.pte_update_defer = lguest_pte_update;
1089
1090 #ifdef CONFIG_X86_LOCAL_APIC
1091         /* apic read/write intercepts */
1092         set_lguest_basic_apic_ops();
1093 #endif
1094
1095         /* time operations */
1096         pv_time_ops.get_wallclock = lguest_get_wallclock;
1097         pv_time_ops.time_init = lguest_time_init;
1098         pv_time_ops.get_tsc_khz = lguest_tsc_khz;
1099
1100         /* Now is a good time to look at the implementations of these functions
1101          * before returning to the rest of lguest_init(). */
1102
1103         /*G:070 Now we've seen all the paravirt_ops, we return to
1104          * lguest_init() where the rest of the fairly chaotic boot setup
1105          * occurs. */
1106
1107         /* The stack protector is a weird thing where gcc places a canary
1108          * value on the stack and then checks it on return.  This file is
1109          * compiled with -fno-stack-protector it, so we got this far without
1110          * problems.  The value of the canary is kept at offset 20 from the
1111          * %gs register, so we need to set that up before calling C functions
1112          * in other files. */
1113         setup_stack_canary_segment(0);
1114         /* We could just call load_stack_canary_segment(), but we might as
1115          * call switch_to_new_gdt() which loads the whole table and sets up
1116          * the per-cpu segment descriptor register %fs as well. */
1117         switch_to_new_gdt(0);
1118
1119         /* As described in head_32.S, we map the first 128M of memory. */
1120         max_pfn_mapped = (128*1024*1024) >> PAGE_SHIFT;
1121
1122         /* The Host<->Guest Switcher lives at the top of our address space, and
1123          * the Host told us how big it is when we made LGUEST_INIT hypercall:
1124          * it put the answer in lguest_data.reserve_mem  */
1125         reserve_top_address(lguest_data.reserve_mem);
1126
1127         /* If we don't initialize the lock dependency checker now, it crashes
1128          * paravirt_disable_iospace. */
1129         lockdep_init();
1130
1131         /* The IDE code spends about 3 seconds probing for disks: if we reserve
1132          * all the I/O ports up front it can't get them and so doesn't probe.
1133          * Other device drivers are similar (but less severe).  This cuts the
1134          * kernel boot time on my machine from 4.1 seconds to 0.45 seconds. */
1135         paravirt_disable_iospace();
1136
1137         /* This is messy CPU setup stuff which the native boot code does before
1138          * start_kernel, so we have to do, too: */
1139         cpu_detect(&new_cpu_data);
1140         /* head.S usually sets up the first capability word, so do it here. */
1141         new_cpu_data.x86_capability[0] = cpuid_edx(1);
1142
1143         /* Math is always hard! */
1144         new_cpu_data.hard_math = 1;
1145
1146         /* We don't have features.  We have puppies!  Puppies! */
1147 #ifdef CONFIG_X86_MCE
1148         mce_disabled = 1;
1149 #endif
1150 #ifdef CONFIG_ACPI
1151         acpi_disabled = 1;
1152         acpi_ht = 0;
1153 #endif
1154
1155         /* We set the preferred console to "hvc".  This is the "hypervisor
1156          * virtual console" driver written by the PowerPC people, which we also
1157          * adapted for lguest's use. */
1158         add_preferred_console("hvc", 0, NULL);
1159
1160         /* Register our very early console. */
1161         virtio_cons_early_init(early_put_chars);
1162
1163         /* Last of all, we set the power management poweroff hook to point to
1164          * the Guest routine to power off, and the reboot hook to our restart
1165          * routine. */
1166         pm_power_off = lguest_power_off;
1167         machine_ops.restart = lguest_restart;
1168
1169         /* Now we're set up, call i386_start_kernel() in head32.c and we proceed
1170          * to boot as normal.  It never returns. */
1171         i386_start_kernel();
1172 }
1173 /*
1174  * This marks the end of stage II of our journey, The Guest.
1175  *
1176  * It is now time for us to explore the layer of virtual drivers and complete
1177  * our understanding of the Guest in "make Drivers".
1178  */