[PATCH] kprobes: fix namespace problem and sparc64 build
[linux-2.6.git] / arch / sparc64 / Kconfig
1 # $Id: config.in,v 1.158 2002/01/24 22:14:44 davem Exp $
2 # For a description of the syntax of this configuration file,
3 # see the Configure script.
4 #
5
6 mainmenu "Linux/UltraSPARC Kernel Configuration"
7
8 config 64BIT
9         def_bool y
10
11 config MMU
12         bool
13         default y
14
15 config TIME_INTERPOLATION
16         bool
17         default y
18
19 choice
20         prompt "Kernel page size"
21         default SPARC64_PAGE_SIZE_8KB
22
23 config SPARC64_PAGE_SIZE_8KB
24         bool "8KB"
25         help
26           This lets you select the page size of the kernel.
27
28           8KB and 64KB work quite well, since Sparc ELF sections
29           provide for up to 64KB alignment.
30
31           Therefore, 512KB and 4MB are for expert hackers only.
32
33           If you don't know what to do, choose 8KB.
34
35 config SPARC64_PAGE_SIZE_64KB
36         bool "64KB"
37
38 config SPARC64_PAGE_SIZE_512KB
39         bool "512KB"
40
41 config SPARC64_PAGE_SIZE_4MB
42         bool "4MB"
43
44 endchoice
45
46 source "init/Kconfig"
47
48 config SYSVIPC_COMPAT
49         bool
50         depends on COMPAT && SYSVIPC
51         default y
52
53 menu "General machine setup"
54
55 config BBC_I2C
56         tristate "UltraSPARC-III bootbus i2c controller driver"
57         depends on PCI
58         help
59           The BBC devices on the UltraSPARC III have two I2C controllers.  The
60           first I2C controller connects mainly to configuration PROMs (NVRAM,
61           CPU configuration, DIMM types, etc.).  The second I2C controller
62           connects to environmental control devices such as fans and
63           temperature sensors.  The second controller also connects to the
64           smartcard reader, if present.  Say Y to enable support for these.
65
66 config VT
67         bool "Virtual terminal" if EMBEDDED
68         select INPUT
69         default y
70         ---help---
71           If you say Y here, you will get support for terminal devices with
72           display and keyboard devices. These are called "virtual" because you
73           can run several virtual terminals (also called virtual consoles) on
74           one physical terminal. This is rather useful, for example one
75           virtual terminal can collect system messages and warnings, another
76           one can be used for a text-mode user session, and a third could run
77           an X session, all in parallel. Switching between virtual terminals
78           is done with certain key combinations, usually Alt-<function key>.
79
80           The setterm command ("man setterm") can be used to change the
81           properties (such as colors or beeping) of a virtual terminal. The
82           man page console_codes(4) ("man console_codes") contains the special
83           character sequences that can be used to change those properties
84           directly. The fonts used on virtual terminals can be changed with
85           the setfont ("man setfont") command and the key bindings are defined
86           with the loadkeys ("man loadkeys") command.
87
88           You need at least one virtual terminal device in order to make use
89           of your keyboard and monitor. Therefore, only people configuring an
90           embedded system would want to say N here in order to save some
91           memory; the only way to log into such a system is then via a serial
92           or network connection.
93
94           If unsure, say Y, or else you won't be able to do much with your new
95           shiny Linux system :-)
96
97 config VT_CONSOLE
98         bool "Support for console on virtual terminal" if EMBEDDED
99         depends on VT
100         default y
101         ---help---
102           The system console is the device which receives all kernel messages
103           and warnings and which allows logins in single user mode. If you
104           answer Y here, a virtual terminal (the device used to interact with
105           a physical terminal) can be used as system console. This is the most
106           common mode of operations, so you should say Y here unless you want
107           the kernel messages be output only to a serial port (in which case
108           you should say Y to "Console on serial port", below).
109
110           If you do say Y here, by default the currently visible virtual
111           terminal (/dev/tty0) will be used as system console. You can change
112           that with a kernel command line option such as "console=tty3" which
113           would use the third virtual terminal as system console. (Try "man
114           bootparam" or see the documentation of your boot loader (lilo or
115           loadlin) about how to pass options to the kernel at boot time.)
116
117           If unsure, say Y.
118
119 config HW_CONSOLE
120         bool
121         depends on VT
122         default y
123
124 config SMP
125         bool "Symmetric multi-processing support"
126         ---help---
127           This enables support for systems with more than one CPU. If you have
128           a system with only one CPU, say N. If you have a system with more than
129           one CPU, say Y.
130
131           If you say N here, the kernel will run on single and multiprocessor
132           machines, but will use only one CPU of a multiprocessor machine. If
133           you say Y here, the kernel will run on many, but not all,
134           singleprocessor machines. On a singleprocessor machine, the kernel
135           will run faster if you say N here.
136
137           People using multiprocessor machines who say Y here should also say
138           Y to "Enhanced Real Time Clock Support", below. The "Advanced Power
139           Management" code will be disabled if you say Y here.
140
141           See also the <file:Documentation/smp.txt>,
142           <file:Documentation/nmi_watchdog.txt> and the SMP-HOWTO available at
143           <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
144
145           If you don't know what to do here, say N.
146
147 config PREEMPT
148         bool "Preemptible Kernel"
149         help
150           This option reduces the latency of the kernel when reacting to
151           real-time or interactive events by allowing a low priority process to
152           be preempted even if it is in kernel mode executing a system call.
153           This allows applications to run more reliably even when the system is
154           under load.
155
156           Say Y here if you are building a kernel for a desktop, embedded
157           or real-time system.  Say N if you are unsure.
158
159 config NR_CPUS
160         int "Maximum number of CPUs (2-64)"
161         range 2 64
162         depends on SMP
163         default "32"
164
165 source "drivers/cpufreq/Kconfig"
166
167 config US3_FREQ
168         tristate "UltraSPARC-III CPU Frequency driver"
169         depends on CPU_FREQ
170         select CPU_FREQ_TABLE
171         help
172           This adds the CPUFreq driver for UltraSPARC-III processors.
173
174           For details, take a look at <file:Documentation/cpu-freq>.
175
176           If in doubt, say N.
177
178 config US2E_FREQ
179         tristate "UltraSPARC-IIe CPU Frequency driver"
180         depends on CPU_FREQ
181         select CPU_FREQ_TABLE
182         help
183           This adds the CPUFreq driver for UltraSPARC-IIe processors.
184
185           For details, take a look at <file:Documentation/cpu-freq>.
186
187           If in doubt, say N.
188
189 # Identify this as a Sparc64 build
190 config SPARC64
191         bool
192         default y
193         help
194           SPARC is a family of RISC microprocessors designed and marketed by
195           Sun Microsystems, incorporated.  This port covers the newer 64-bit
196           UltraSPARC.  The UltraLinux project maintains both the SPARC32 and
197           SPARC64 ports; its web page is available at
198           <http://www.ultralinux.org/>.
199
200 # Global things across all Sun machines.
201 config RWSEM_GENERIC_SPINLOCK
202         bool
203
204 config RWSEM_XCHGADD_ALGORITHM
205         bool
206         default y
207
208 config GENERIC_CALIBRATE_DELAY
209         bool
210         default y
211
212 choice
213         prompt "SPARC64 Huge TLB Page Size"
214         depends on HUGETLB_PAGE
215         default HUGETLB_PAGE_SIZE_4MB
216
217 config HUGETLB_PAGE_SIZE_4MB
218         bool "4MB"
219
220 config HUGETLB_PAGE_SIZE_512K
221         depends on !SPARC64_PAGE_SIZE_4MB
222         bool "512K"
223
224 config HUGETLB_PAGE_SIZE_64K
225         depends on !SPARC64_PAGE_SIZE_4MB && !SPARC64_PAGE_SIZE_512K
226         bool "64K"
227
228 endchoice
229
230 config GENERIC_ISA_DMA
231         bool
232         default y
233
234 config ISA
235         bool
236         help
237           Find out whether you have ISA slots on your motherboard.  ISA is the
238           name of a bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff
239           inside your box.  Other bus systems are PCI, EISA, MicroChannel
240           (MCA) or VESA.  ISA is an older system, now being displaced by PCI;
241           newer boards don't support it.  If you have ISA, say Y, otherwise N.
242
243 config ISAPNP
244         bool
245         help
246           Say Y here if you would like support for ISA Plug and Play devices.
247           Some information is in <file:Documentation/isapnp.txt>.
248
249           To compile this driver as a module, choose M here: the
250           module will be called isapnp.
251
252           If unsure, say Y.
253
254 config EISA
255         bool
256         ---help---
257           The Extended Industry Standard Architecture (EISA) bus was
258           developed as an open alternative to the IBM MicroChannel bus.
259
260           The EISA bus provided some of the features of the IBM MicroChannel
261           bus while maintaining backward compatibility with cards made for
262           the older ISA bus.  The EISA bus saw limited use between 1988 and
263           1995 when it was made obsolete by the PCI bus.
264
265           Say Y here if you are building a kernel for an EISA-based machine.
266
267           Otherwise, say N.
268
269 config MCA
270         bool
271         help
272           MicroChannel Architecture is found in some IBM PS/2 machines and
273           laptops.  It is a bus system similar to PCI or ISA. See
274           <file:Documentation/mca.txt> (and especially the web page given
275           there) before attempting to build an MCA bus kernel.
276
277 config PCMCIA
278         tristate
279         ---help---
280           Say Y here if you want to attach PCMCIA- or PC-cards to your Linux
281           computer.  These are credit-card size devices such as network cards,
282           modems or hard drives often used with laptops computers.  There are
283           actually two varieties of these cards: the older 16 bit PCMCIA cards
284           and the newer 32 bit CardBus cards.  If you want to use CardBus
285           cards, you need to say Y here and also to "CardBus support" below.
286
287           To use your PC-cards, you will need supporting software from David
288           Hinds' pcmcia-cs package (see the file <file:Documentation/Changes>
289           for location).  Please also read the PCMCIA-HOWTO, available from
290           <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
291
292           To compile this driver as modules, choose M here: the
293           modules will be called pcmcia_core and ds.
294
295 config SBUS
296         bool
297         default y
298
299 config SBUSCHAR
300         bool
301         default y
302
303 config SUN_AUXIO
304         bool
305         default y
306
307 config SUN_IO
308         bool
309         default y
310
311 config PCI
312         bool "PCI support"
313         help
314           Find out whether you have a PCI motherboard. PCI is the name of a
315           bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff inside
316           your box. Other bus systems are ISA, EISA, MicroChannel (MCA) or
317           VESA. If you have PCI, say Y, otherwise N.
318
319           The PCI-HOWTO, available from
320           <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, contains valuable
321           information about which PCI hardware does work under Linux and which
322           doesn't.
323
324 config PCI_DOMAINS
325         bool
326         default PCI
327
328 config RTC
329         tristate
330         depends on PCI
331         default y
332         ---help---
333           If you say Y here and create a character special file /dev/rtc with
334           major number 10 and minor number 135 using mknod ("man mknod"), you
335           will get access to the real time clock (or hardware clock) built
336           into your computer.
337
338           Every PC has such a clock built in. It can be used to generate
339           signals from as low as 1Hz up to 8192Hz, and can also be used
340           as a 24 hour alarm. It reports status information via the file
341           /proc/driver/rtc and its behaviour is set by various ioctls on
342           /dev/rtc.
343
344           If you run Linux on a multiprocessor machine and said Y to
345           "Symmetric Multi Processing" above, you should say Y here to read
346           and set the RTC in an SMP compatible fashion.
347
348           If you think you have a use for such a device (such as periodic data
349           sampling), then say Y here, and read <file:Documentation/rtc.txt>
350           for details.
351
352           To compile this driver as a module, choose M here: the
353           module will be called rtc.
354
355 source "drivers/pci/Kconfig"
356
357 config SUN_OPENPROMFS
358         tristate "Openprom tree appears in /proc/openprom"
359         help
360           If you say Y, the OpenPROM device tree will be available as a
361           virtual file system, which you can mount to /proc/openprom by "mount
362           -t openpromfs none /proc/openprom".
363
364           To compile the /proc/openprom support as a module, choose M here: the
365           module will be called openpromfs.  If unsure, choose M.
366
367 config SPARC32_COMPAT
368         bool "Kernel support for Linux/Sparc 32bit binary compatibility"
369         help
370           This allows you to run 32-bit binaries on your Ultra.
371           Everybody wants this; say Y.
372
373 config COMPAT
374         bool
375         depends on SPARC32_COMPAT
376         default y
377
378 config UID16
379         bool
380         depends on SPARC32_COMPAT
381         default y
382
383 config BINFMT_ELF32
384         tristate "Kernel support for 32-bit ELF binaries"
385         depends on SPARC32_COMPAT
386         help
387           This allows you to run 32-bit Linux/ELF binaries on your Ultra.
388           Everybody wants this; say Y.
389
390 config BINFMT_AOUT32
391         bool "Kernel support for 32-bit (ie. SunOS) a.out binaries"
392         depends on SPARC32_COMPAT
393         help
394           This allows you to run 32-bit a.out format binaries on your Ultra.
395           If you want to run SunOS binaries (see SunOS binary emulation below)
396           or other a.out binaries, say Y. If unsure, say N.
397
398 source "fs/Kconfig.binfmt"
399
400 config SUNOS_EMUL
401         bool "SunOS binary emulation"
402         depends on BINFMT_AOUT32
403         help
404           This allows you to run most SunOS binaries.  If you want to do this,
405           say Y here and place appropriate files in /usr/gnemul/sunos. See
406           <http://www.ultralinux.org/faq.html> for more information.  If you
407           want to run SunOS binaries on an Ultra you must also say Y to
408           "Kernel support for 32-bit a.out binaries" above.
409
410 config SOLARIS_EMUL
411         tristate "Solaris binary emulation (EXPERIMENTAL)"
412         depends on SPARC32_COMPAT && EXPERIMENTAL
413         help
414           This is experimental code which will enable you to run (many)
415           Solaris binaries on your SPARC Linux machine.
416
417           To compile this code as a module, choose M here: the
418           module will be called solaris.
419
420 source "drivers/parport/Kconfig"
421
422 config PRINTER
423         tristate "Parallel printer support"
424         depends on PARPORT
425         ---help---
426           If you intend to attach a printer to the parallel port of your Linux
427           box (as opposed to using a serial printer; if the connector at the
428           printer has 9 or 25 holes ["female"], then it's serial), say Y.
429           Also read the Printing-HOWTO, available from
430           <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
431
432           It is possible to share one parallel port among several devices
433           (e.g. printer and ZIP drive) and it is safe to compile the
434           corresponding drivers into the kernel.
435           To compile this driver as a module, choose M here and read
436           <file:Documentation/parport.txt>.  The module will be called lp.
437
438           If you have several parallel ports, you can specify which ports to
439           use with the "lp" kernel command line option.  (Try "man bootparam"
440           or see the documentation of your boot loader (lilo or loadlin) about
441           how to pass options to the kernel at boot time.)  The syntax of the
442           "lp" command line option can be found in <file:drivers/char/lp.c>.
443
444           If you have more than 8 printers, you need to increase the LP_NO
445           macro in lp.c and the PARPORT_MAX macro in parport.h.
446
447 config PPDEV
448         tristate "Support for user-space parallel port device drivers"
449         depends on PARPORT
450         ---help---
451           Saying Y to this adds support for /dev/parport device nodes.  This
452           is needed for programs that want portable access to the parallel
453           port, for instance deviceid (which displays Plug-and-Play device
454           IDs).
455
456           This is the parallel port equivalent of SCSI generic support (sg).
457           It is safe to say N to this -- it is not needed for normal printing
458           or parallel port CD-ROM/disk support.
459
460           To compile this driver as a module, choose M here: the
461           module will be called ppdev.
462
463           If unsure, say N.
464
465 config ENVCTRL
466         tristate "SUNW, envctrl support"
467         depends on PCI
468         help
469           Kernel support for temperature and fan monitoring on Sun SME
470           machines.
471
472           To compile this driver as a module, choose M here: the
473           module will be called envctrl.
474
475 config DISPLAY7SEG
476         tristate "7-Segment Display support"
477         depends on PCI
478         ---help---
479           This is the driver for the 7-segment display and LED present on
480           Sun Microsystems CompactPCI models CP1400 and CP1500.
481
482           To compile this driver as a module, choose M here: the
483           module will be called display7seg.
484
485           If you do not have a CompactPCI model CP1400 or CP1500, or
486           another UltraSPARC-IIi-cEngine boardset with a 7-segment display,
487           you should say N to this option.
488
489 config CMDLINE_BOOL
490         bool "Default bootloader kernel arguments"
491
492 config CMDLINE
493         string "Initial kernel command string"
494         depends on CMDLINE_BOOL
495         default "console=ttyS0,9600 root=/dev/sda1"
496         help
497           Say Y here if you want to be able to pass default arguments to
498           the kernel. This will be overridden by the bootloader, if you
499           use one (such as SILO). This is most useful if you want to boot
500           a kernel from TFTP, and want default options to be available
501           with having them passed on the command line.
502
503           NOTE: This option WILL override the PROM bootargs setting!
504
505 source "mm/Kconfig"
506
507 endmenu
508
509 source "drivers/base/Kconfig"
510
511 source "drivers/video/Kconfig"
512
513 source "drivers/serial/Kconfig"
514
515 source "drivers/sbus/char/Kconfig"
516
517 source "drivers/mtd/Kconfig"
518
519 source "drivers/block/Kconfig"
520
521 source "drivers/ide/Kconfig"
522
523 source "drivers/scsi/Kconfig"
524
525 source "drivers/fc4/Kconfig"
526
527 source "drivers/md/Kconfig"
528
529 if PCI
530 source "drivers/message/fusion/Kconfig"
531 endif
532
533 source "drivers/ieee1394/Kconfig"
534
535 source "net/Kconfig"
536
537 source "drivers/isdn/Kconfig"
538
539 source "drivers/telephony/Kconfig"
540
541 # This one must be before the filesystem configs. -DaveM
542
543 menu "Unix98 PTY support"
544
545 config UNIX98_PTYS
546         bool "Unix98 PTY support"
547         ---help---
548           A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two
549           halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to
550           a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to
551           read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a
552           terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers
553           and xterms.
554
555           Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for
556           masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme
557           has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later,
558           however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a
559           pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo
560           terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo
561           terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was
562           traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.
563
564           The entries in /dev/pts/ are created on the fly by a virtual
565           file system; therefore, if you say Y here you should say Y to
566           "/dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs" as well.
567
568           If you want to say Y here, you need to have the C library glibc 2.1
569           or later (equal to libc-6.1, check with "ls -l /lib/libc.so.*").
570           Read the instructions in <file:Documentation/Changes> pertaining to
571           pseudo terminals. It's safe to say N.
572
573 config UNIX98_PTY_COUNT
574         int "Maximum number of Unix98 PTYs in use (0-2048)"
575         depends on UNIX98_PTYS
576         default "256"
577         help
578           The maximum number of Unix98 PTYs that can be used at any one time.
579           The default is 256, and should be enough for desktop systems. Server
580           machines which support incoming telnet/rlogin/ssh connections and/or
581           serve several X terminals may want to increase this: every incoming
582           connection and every xterm uses up one PTY.
583
584           When not in use, each additional set of 256 PTYs occupy
585           approximately 8 KB of kernel memory on 32-bit architectures.
586
587 endmenu
588
589 menu "XFree86 DRI support"
590
591 config DRM
592         bool "Direct Rendering Manager (XFree86 DRI support)"
593         help
594           Kernel-level support for the Direct Rendering Infrastructure (DRI)
595           introduced in XFree86 4.0. If you say Y here, you need to select
596           the module that's right for your graphics card from the list below.
597           These modules provide support for synchronization, security, and
598           DMA transfers. Please see <http://dri.sourceforge.net/> for more
599           details.  You should also select and configure AGP
600           (/dev/agpgart) support.
601
602 config DRM_FFB
603         tristate "Creator/Creator3D"
604         depends on DRM && BROKEN
605         help
606           Choose this option if you have one of Sun's Creator3D-based graphics
607           and frame buffer cards.  Product page at
608           <http://www.sun.com/desktop/products/Graphics/creator3d.html>.
609
610 config DRM_TDFX
611         tristate "3dfx Banshee/Voodoo3+"
612         depends on DRM
613         help
614           Choose this option if you have a 3dfx Banshee or Voodoo3 (or later),
615           graphics card.  If M is selected, the module will be called tdfx.
616
617 config DRM_R128
618         tristate "ATI Rage 128"
619         depends on DRM
620         help
621           Choose this option if you have an ATI Rage 128 graphics card.  If M
622           is selected, the module will be called r128.  AGP support for
623           this card is strongly suggested (unless you have a PCI version).
624
625 endmenu
626
627 source "drivers/input/Kconfig"
628
629 source "drivers/i2c/Kconfig"
630
631 source "fs/Kconfig"
632
633 source "drivers/media/Kconfig"
634
635 source "sound/Kconfig"
636
637 source "drivers/usb/Kconfig"
638
639 source "drivers/infiniband/Kconfig"
640
641 source "drivers/char/watchdog/Kconfig"
642
643 source "arch/sparc64/oprofile/Kconfig"
644
645 source "arch/sparc64/Kconfig.debug"
646
647 source "security/Kconfig"
648
649 source "crypto/Kconfig"
650
651 source "lib/Kconfig"