lguest: do not statically allocate root device
[linux-3.10.git] / drivers / lguest / core.c
index ca581ef..90663e0 100644 (file)
@@ -1,8 +1,6 @@
 /*P:400 This contains run_guest() which actually calls into the Host<->Guest
  * Switcher and analyzes the return, such as determining if the Guest wants the
- * Host to do something.  This file also contains useful helper routines, and a
- * couple of non-obvious setup and teardown pieces which were implemented after
- * days of debugging pain. :*/
+ * Host to do something.  This file also contains useful helper routines. :*/
 #include <linux/module.h>
 #include <linux/stringify.h>
 #include <linux/stddef.h>
 #include <linux/vmalloc.h>
 #include <linux/cpu.h>
 #include <linux/freezer.h>
+#include <linux/highmem.h>
 #include <asm/paravirt.h>
-#include <asm/desc.h>
 #include <asm/pgtable.h>
 #include <asm/uaccess.h>
 #include <asm/poll.h>
-#include <asm/highmem.h>
 #include <asm/asm-offsets.h>
-#include <asm/i387.h>
 #include "lg.h"
 
-/* Found in switcher.S */
-extern char start_switcher_text[], end_switcher_text[], switch_to_guest[];
-extern unsigned long default_idt_entries[];
-
-/* Every guest maps the core switcher code. */
-#define SHARED_SWITCHER_PAGES \
-       DIV_ROUND_UP(end_switcher_text - start_switcher_text, PAGE_SIZE)
-/* Pages for switcher itself, then two pages per cpu */
-#define TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES (SHARED_SWITCHER_PAGES + 2 * NR_CPUS)
-
-/* We map at -4M for ease of mapping into the guest (one PTE page). */
-#define SWITCHER_ADDR 0xFFC00000
 
 static struct vm_struct *switcher_vma;
 static struct page **switcher_page;
 
-static int cpu_had_pge;
-static struct {
-       unsigned long offset;
-       unsigned short segment;
-} lguest_entry;
-
 /* This One Big lock protects all inter-guest data structures. */
 DEFINE_MUTEX(lguest_lock);
-static DEFINE_PER_CPU(struct lguest *, last_guest);
-
-/* Offset from where switcher.S was compiled to where we've copied it */
-static unsigned long switcher_offset(void)
-{
-       return SWITCHER_ADDR - (unsigned long)start_switcher_text;
-}
-
-/* This cpu's struct lguest_pages. */
-static struct lguest_pages *lguest_pages(unsigned int cpu)
-{
-       return &(((struct lguest_pages *)
-                 (SWITCHER_ADDR + SHARED_SWITCHER_PAGES*PAGE_SIZE))[cpu]);
-}
 
 /*H:010 We need to set up the Switcher at a high virtual address.  Remember the
  * Switcher is a few hundred bytes of assembler code which actually changes the
@@ -69,9 +33,7 @@ static struct lguest_pages *lguest_pages(unsigned int cpu)
  * Host since it will be running as the switchover occurs.
  *
  * Trying to map memory at a particular address is an unusual thing to do, so
- * it's not a simple one-liner.  We also set up the per-cpu parts of the
- * Switcher here.
- */
+ * it's not a simple one-liner. */
 static __init int map_switcher(void)
 {
        int i, err;
@@ -85,8 +47,8 @@ static __init int map_switcher(void)
         * easy.
         */
 
-       /* We allocate an array of "struct page"s.  map_vm_area() wants the
-        * pages in this form, rather than just an array of pointers. */
+       /* We allocate an array of struct page pointers.  map_vm_area() wants
+        * this, rather than just an array of pages. */
        switcher_page = kmalloc(sizeof(switcher_page[0])*TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES,
                                GFP_KERNEL);
        if (!switcher_page) {
@@ -105,11 +67,22 @@ static __init int map_switcher(void)
                switcher_page[i] = virt_to_page(addr);
        }
 
+       /* First we check that the Switcher won't overlap the fixmap area at
+        * the top of memory.  It's currently nowhere near, but it could have
+        * very strange effects if it ever happened. */
+       if (SWITCHER_ADDR + (TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES+1)*PAGE_SIZE > FIXADDR_START){
+               err = -ENOMEM;
+               printk("lguest: mapping switcher would thwack fixmap\n");
+               goto free_pages;
+       }
+
        /* Now we reserve the "virtual memory area" we want: 0xFFC00000
         * (SWITCHER_ADDR).  We might not get it in theory, but in practice
-        * it's worked so far. */
+        * it's worked so far.  The end address needs +1 because __get_vm_area
+        * allocates an extra guard page, so we need space for that. */
        switcher_vma = __get_vm_area(TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES * PAGE_SIZE,
-                                      VM_ALLOC, SWITCHER_ADDR, VMALLOC_END);
+                                    VM_ALLOC, SWITCHER_ADDR, SWITCHER_ADDR
+                                    + (TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES+1) * PAGE_SIZE);
        if (!switcher_vma) {
                err = -ENOMEM;
                printk("lguest: could not map switcher pages high\n");
@@ -128,90 +101,11 @@ static __init int map_switcher(void)
                goto free_vma;
        }
 
-       /* Now the switcher is mapped at the right address, we can't fail!
-        * Copy in the compiled-in Switcher code (from switcher.S). */
+       /* Now the Switcher is mapped at the right address, we can't fail!
+        * Copy in the compiled-in Switcher code (from <arch>_switcher.S). */
        memcpy(switcher_vma->addr, start_switcher_text,
               end_switcher_text - start_switcher_text);
 
-       /* Most of the switcher.S doesn't care that it's been moved; on Intel,
-        * jumps are relative, and it doesn't access any references to external
-        * code or data.
-        *
-        * The only exception is the interrupt handlers in switcher.S: their
-        * addresses are placed in a table (default_idt_entries), so we need to
-        * update the table with the new addresses.  switcher_offset() is a
-        * convenience function which returns the distance between the builtin
-        * switcher code and the high-mapped copy we just made. */
-       for (i = 0; i < IDT_ENTRIES; i++)
-               default_idt_entries[i] += switcher_offset();
-
-       /*
-        * Set up the Switcher's per-cpu areas.
-        *
-        * Each CPU gets two pages of its own within the high-mapped region
-        * (aka. "struct lguest_pages").  Much of this can be initialized now,
-        * but some depends on what Guest we are running (which is set up in
-        * copy_in_guest_info()).
-        */
-       for_each_possible_cpu(i) {
-               /* lguest_pages() returns this CPU's two pages. */
-               struct lguest_pages *pages = lguest_pages(i);
-               /* This is a convenience pointer to make the code fit one
-                * statement to a line. */
-               struct lguest_ro_state *state = &pages->state;
-
-               /* The Global Descriptor Table: the Host has a different one
-                * for each CPU.  We keep a descriptor for the GDT which says
-                * where it is and how big it is (the size is actually the last
-                * byte, not the size, hence the "-1"). */
-               state->host_gdt_desc.size = GDT_SIZE-1;
-               state->host_gdt_desc.address = (long)get_cpu_gdt_table(i);
-
-               /* All CPUs on the Host use the same Interrupt Descriptor
-                * Table, so we just use store_idt(), which gets this CPU's IDT
-                * descriptor. */
-               store_idt(&state->host_idt_desc);
-
-               /* The descriptors for the Guest's GDT and IDT can be filled
-                * out now, too.  We copy the GDT & IDT into ->guest_gdt and
-                * ->guest_idt before actually running the Guest. */
-               state->guest_idt_desc.size = sizeof(state->guest_idt)-1;
-               state->guest_idt_desc.address = (long)&state->guest_idt;
-               state->guest_gdt_desc.size = sizeof(state->guest_gdt)-1;
-               state->guest_gdt_desc.address = (long)&state->guest_gdt;
-
-               /* We know where we want the stack to be when the Guest enters
-                * the switcher: in pages->regs.  The stack grows upwards, so
-                * we start it at the end of that structure. */
-               state->guest_tss.esp0 = (long)(&pages->regs + 1);
-               /* And this is the GDT entry to use for the stack: we keep a
-                * couple of special LGUEST entries. */
-               state->guest_tss.ss0 = LGUEST_DS;
-
-               /* x86 can have a finegrained bitmap which indicates what I/O
-                * ports the process can use.  We set it to the end of our
-                * structure, meaning "none". */
-               state->guest_tss.io_bitmap_base = sizeof(state->guest_tss);
-
-               /* Some GDT entries are the same across all Guests, so we can
-                * set them up now. */
-               setup_default_gdt_entries(state);
-               /* Most IDT entries are the same for all Guests, too.*/
-               setup_default_idt_entries(state, default_idt_entries);
-
-               /* The Host needs to be able to use the LGUEST segments on this
-                * CPU, too, so put them in the Host GDT. */
-               get_cpu_gdt_table(i)[GDT_ENTRY_LGUEST_CS] = FULL_EXEC_SEGMENT;
-               get_cpu_gdt_table(i)[GDT_ENTRY_LGUEST_DS] = FULL_SEGMENT;
-       }
-
-       /* In the Switcher, we want the %cs segment register to use the
-        * LGUEST_CS GDT entry: we've put that in the Host and Guest GDTs, so
-        * it will be undisturbed when we switch.  To change %cs and jump we
-        * need this structure to feed to Intel's "lcall" instruction. */
-       lguest_entry.offset = (long)switch_to_guest + switcher_offset();
-       lguest_entry.segment = LGUEST_CS;
-
        printk(KERN_INFO "lguest: mapped switcher at %p\n",
               switcher_vma->addr);
        /* And we succeeded... */
@@ -241,85 +135,15 @@ static void unmap_switcher(void)
        /* Now we just need to free the pages we copied the switcher into */
        for (i = 0; i < TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES; i++)
                __free_pages(switcher_page[i], 0);
+       kfree(switcher_page);
 }
 
-/*H:130 Our Guest is usually so well behaved; it never tries to do things it
- * isn't allowed to.  Unfortunately, Linux's paravirtual infrastructure isn't
- * quite complete, because it doesn't contain replacements for the Intel I/O
- * instructions.  As a result, the Guest sometimes fumbles across one during
- * the boot process as it probes for various things which are usually attached
- * to a PC.
- *
- * When the Guest uses one of these instructions, we get trap #13 (General
- * Protection Fault) and come here.  We see if it's one of those troublesome
- * instructions and skip over it.  We return true if we did. */
-static int emulate_insn(struct lguest *lg)
-{
-       u8 insn;
-       unsigned int insnlen = 0, in = 0, shift = 0;
-       /* The eip contains the *virtual* address of the Guest's instruction:
-        * guest_pa just subtracts the Guest's page_offset. */
-       unsigned long physaddr = guest_pa(lg, lg->regs->eip);
-
-       /* The guest_pa() function only works for Guest kernel addresses, but
-        * that's all we're trying to do anyway. */
-       if (lg->regs->eip < lg->page_offset)
-               return 0;
-
-       /* Decoding x86 instructions is icky. */
-       lgread(lg, &insn, physaddr, 1);
-
-       /* 0x66 is an "operand prefix".  It means it's using the upper 16 bits
-          of the eax register. */
-       if (insn == 0x66) {
-               shift = 16;
-               /* The instruction is 1 byte so far, read the next byte. */
-               insnlen = 1;
-               lgread(lg, &insn, physaddr + insnlen, 1);
-       }
-
-       /* We can ignore the lower bit for the moment and decode the 4 opcodes
-        * we need to emulate. */
-       switch (insn & 0xFE) {
-       case 0xE4: /* in     <next byte>,%al */
-               insnlen += 2;
-               in = 1;
-               break;
-       case 0xEC: /* in     (%dx),%al */
-               insnlen += 1;
-               in = 1;
-               break;
-       case 0xE6: /* out    %al,<next byte> */
-               insnlen += 2;
-               break;
-       case 0xEE: /* out    %al,(%dx) */
-               insnlen += 1;
-               break;
-       default:
-               /* OK, we don't know what this is, can't emulate. */
-               return 0;
-       }
-
-       /* If it was an "IN" instruction, they expect the result to be read
-        * into %eax, so we change %eax.  We always return all-ones, which
-        * traditionally means "there's nothing there". */
-       if (in) {
-               /* Lower bit tells is whether it's a 16 or 32 bit access */
-               if (insn & 0x1)
-                       lg->regs->eax = 0xFFFFFFFF;
-               else
-                       lg->regs->eax |= (0xFFFF << shift);
-       }
-       /* Finally, we've "done" the instruction, so move past it. */
-       lg->regs->eip += insnlen;
-       /* Success! */
-       return 1;
-}
-/*:*/
-
-/*L:305
+/*H:032
  * Dealing With Guest Memory.
  *
+ * Before we go too much further into the Host, we need to grok the routines
+ * we use to deal with Guest memory.
+ *
  * When the Guest gives us (what it thinks is) a physical address, we can use
  * the normal copy_from_user() & copy_to_user() on the corresponding place in
  * the memory region allocated by the Launcher.
@@ -334,173 +158,46 @@ int lguest_address_ok(const struct lguest *lg,
        return (addr+len) / PAGE_SIZE < lg->pfn_limit && (addr+len >= addr);
 }
 
-/* This is a convenient routine to get a 32-bit value from the Guest (a very
- * common operation).  Here we can see how useful the kill_lguest() routine we
- * met in the Launcher can be: we return a random value (0) instead of needing
- * to return an error. */
-u32 lgread_u32(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long addr)
-{
-       u32 val = 0;
-
-       /* Don't let them access lguest binary. */
-       if (!lguest_address_ok(lg, addr, sizeof(val))
-           || get_user(val, (u32 *)(lg->mem_base + addr)) != 0)
-               kill_guest(lg, "bad read address %#lx: pfn_limit=%u membase=%p", addr, lg->pfn_limit, lg->mem_base);
-       return val;
-}
-
-/* Same thing for writing a value. */
-void lgwrite_u32(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long addr, u32 val)
+/* This routine copies memory from the Guest.  Here we can see how useful the
+ * kill_lguest() routine we met in the Launcher can be: we return a random
+ * value (all zeroes) instead of needing to return an error. */
+void __lgread(struct lg_cpu *cpu, void *b, unsigned long addr, unsigned bytes)
 {
-       if (!lguest_address_ok(lg, addr, sizeof(val))
-           || put_user(val, (u32 *)(lg->mem_base + addr)) != 0)
-               kill_guest(lg, "bad write address %#lx", addr);
-}
-
-/* This routine is more generic, and copies a range of Guest bytes into a
- * buffer.  If the copy_from_user() fails, we fill the buffer with zeroes, so
- * the caller doesn't end up using uninitialized kernel memory. */
-void lgread(struct lguest *lg, void *b, unsigned long addr, unsigned bytes)
-{
-       if (!lguest_address_ok(lg, addr, bytes)
-           || copy_from_user(b, lg->mem_base + addr, bytes) != 0) {
+       if (!lguest_address_ok(cpu->lg, addr, bytes)
+           || copy_from_user(b, cpu->lg->mem_base + addr, bytes) != 0) {
                /* copy_from_user should do this, but as we rely on it... */
                memset(b, 0, bytes);
-               kill_guest(lg, "bad read address %#lx len %u", addr, bytes);
+               kill_guest(cpu, "bad read address %#lx len %u", addr, bytes);
        }
 }
 
-/* Similarly, our generic routine to copy into a range of Guest bytes. */
-void lgwrite(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long addr, const void *b,
-            unsigned bytes)
+/* This is the write (copy into Guest) version. */
+void __lgwrite(struct lg_cpu *cpu, unsigned long addr, const void *b,
+              unsigned bytes)
 {
-       if (!lguest_address_ok(lg, addr, bytes)
-           || copy_to_user(lg->mem_base + addr, b, bytes) != 0)
-               kill_guest(lg, "bad write address %#lx len %u", addr, bytes);
-}
-/* (end of memory access helper routines) :*/
-
-static void set_ts(void)
-{
-       u32 cr0;
-
-       cr0 = read_cr0();
-       if (!(cr0 & 8))
-               write_cr0(cr0|8);
-}
-
-/*S:010
- * We are getting close to the Switcher.
- *
- * Remember that each CPU has two pages which are visible to the Guest when it
- * runs on that CPU.  This has to contain the state for that Guest: we copy the
- * state in just before we run the Guest.
- *
- * Each Guest has "changed" flags which indicate what has changed in the Guest
- * since it last ran.  We saw this set in interrupts_and_traps.c and
- * segments.c.
- */
-static void copy_in_guest_info(struct lguest *lg, struct lguest_pages *pages)
-{
-       /* Copying all this data can be quite expensive.  We usually run the
-        * same Guest we ran last time (and that Guest hasn't run anywhere else
-        * meanwhile).  If that's not the case, we pretend everything in the
-        * Guest has changed. */
-       if (__get_cpu_var(last_guest) != lg || lg->last_pages != pages) {
-               __get_cpu_var(last_guest) = lg;
-               lg->last_pages = pages;
-               lg->changed = CHANGED_ALL;
-       }
-
-       /* These copies are pretty cheap, so we do them unconditionally: */
-       /* Save the current Host top-level page directory. */
-       pages->state.host_cr3 = __pa(current->mm->pgd);
-       /* Set up the Guest's page tables to see this CPU's pages (and no
-        * other CPU's pages). */
-       map_switcher_in_guest(lg, pages);
-       /* Set up the two "TSS" members which tell the CPU what stack to use
-        * for traps which do directly into the Guest (ie. traps at privilege
-        * level 1). */
-       pages->state.guest_tss.esp1 = lg->esp1;
-       pages->state.guest_tss.ss1 = lg->ss1;
-
-       /* Copy direct-to-Guest trap entries. */
-       if (lg->changed & CHANGED_IDT)
-               copy_traps(lg, pages->state.guest_idt, default_idt_entries);
-
-       /* Copy all GDT entries which the Guest can change. */
-       if (lg->changed & CHANGED_GDT)
-               copy_gdt(lg, pages->state.guest_gdt);
-       /* If only the TLS entries have changed, copy them. */
-       else if (lg->changed & CHANGED_GDT_TLS)
-               copy_gdt_tls(lg, pages->state.guest_gdt);
-
-       /* Mark the Guest as unchanged for next time. */
-       lg->changed = 0;
-}
-
-/* Finally: the code to actually call into the Switcher to run the Guest. */
-static void run_guest_once(struct lguest *lg, struct lguest_pages *pages)
-{
-       /* This is a dummy value we need for GCC's sake. */
-       unsigned int clobber;
-
-       /* Copy the guest-specific information into this CPU's "struct
-        * lguest_pages". */
-       copy_in_guest_info(lg, pages);
-
-       /* Set the trap number to 256 (impossible value).  If we fault while
-        * switching to the Guest (bad segment registers or bug), this will
-        * cause us to abort the Guest. */
-       lg->regs->trapnum = 256;
-
-       /* Now: we push the "eflags" register on the stack, then do an "lcall".
-        * This is how we change from using the kernel code segment to using
-        * the dedicated lguest code segment, as well as jumping into the
-        * Switcher.
-        *
-        * The lcall also pushes the old code segment (KERNEL_CS) onto the
-        * stack, then the address of this call.  This stack layout happens to
-        * exactly match the stack of an interrupt... */
-       asm volatile("pushf; lcall *lguest_entry"
-                    /* This is how we tell GCC that %eax ("a") and %ebx ("b")
-                     * are changed by this routine.  The "=" means output. */
-                    : "=a"(clobber), "=b"(clobber)
-                    /* %eax contains the pages pointer.  ("0" refers to the
-                     * 0-th argument above, ie "a").  %ebx contains the
-                     * physical address of the Guest's top-level page
-                     * directory. */
-                    : "0"(pages), "1"(__pa(lg->pgdirs[lg->pgdidx].pgdir))
-                    /* We tell gcc that all these registers could change,
-                     * which means we don't have to save and restore them in
-                     * the Switcher. */
-                    : "memory", "%edx", "%ecx", "%edi", "%esi");
+       if (!lguest_address_ok(cpu->lg, addr, bytes)
+           || copy_to_user(cpu->lg->mem_base + addr, b, bytes) != 0)
+               kill_guest(cpu, "bad write address %#lx len %u", addr, bytes);
 }
 /*:*/
 
 /*H:030 Let's jump straight to the the main loop which runs the Guest.
  * Remember, this is called by the Launcher reading /dev/lguest, and we keep
  * going around and around until something interesting happens. */
-int run_guest(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long __user *user)
+int run_guest(struct lg_cpu *cpu, unsigned long __user *user)
 {
        /* We stop running once the Guest is dead. */
-       while (!lg->dead) {
-               /* We need to initialize this, otherwise gcc complains.  It's
-                * not (yet) clever enough to see that it's initialized when we
-                * need it. */
-               unsigned int cr2 = 0; /* Damn gcc */
-
-               /* First we run any hypercalls the Guest wants done: either in
-                * the hypercall ring in "struct lguest_data", or directly by
-                * using int 31 (LGUEST_TRAP_ENTRY). */
-               do_hypercalls(lg);
-               /* It's possible the Guest did a SEND_DMA hypercall to the
+       while (!cpu->lg->dead) {
+               /* First we run any hypercalls the Guest wants done. */
+               if (cpu->hcall)
+                       do_hypercalls(cpu);
+
+               /* It's possible the Guest did a NOTIFY hypercall to the
                 * Launcher, in which case we return from the read() now. */
-               if (lg->dma_is_pending) {
-                       if (put_user(lg->pending_dma, user) ||
-                           put_user(lg->pending_key, user+1))
+               if (cpu->pending_notify) {
+                       if (put_user(cpu->pending_notify, user))
                                return -EFAULT;
-                       return sizeof(unsigned long)*2;
+                       return sizeof(cpu->pending_notify);
                }
 
                /* Check for signals */
@@ -508,13 +205,13 @@ int run_guest(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long __user *user)
                        return -ERESTARTSYS;
 
                /* If Waker set break_out, return to Launcher. */
-               if (lg->break_out)
+               if (cpu->break_out)
                        return -EAGAIN;
 
-               /* Check if there are any interrupts which can be delivered
-                * now: if so, this sets up the hander to be executed when we
-                * next run the Guest. */
-               maybe_do_interrupt(lg);
+               /* Check if there are any interrupts which can be delivered now:
+                * if so, this sets up the hander to be executed when we next
+                * run the Guest. */
+               maybe_do_interrupt(cpu);
 
                /* All long-lived kernel loops need to check with this horrible
                 * thing called the freezer.  If the Host is trying to suspend,
@@ -523,12 +220,12 @@ int run_guest(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long __user *user)
 
                /* Just make absolutely sure the Guest is still alive.  One of
                 * those hypercalls could have been fatal, for example. */
-               if (lg->dead)
+               if (cpu->lg->dead)
                        break;
 
                /* If the Guest asked to be stopped, we sleep.  The Guest's
                 * clock timer or LHCALL_BREAK from the Waker will wake us. */
-               if (lg->halted) {
+               if (cpu->halted) {
                        set_current_state(TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE);
                        schedule();
                        continue;
@@ -538,132 +235,24 @@ int run_guest(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long __user *user)
                 * the "Do Not Disturb" sign: */
                local_irq_disable();
 
-               /* Remember the awfully-named TS bit?  If the Guest has asked
-                * to set it we set it now, so we can trap and pass that trap
-                * to the Guest if it uses the FPU. */
-               if (lg->ts)
-                       set_ts();
-
-               /* SYSENTER is an optimized way of doing system calls.  We
-                * can't allow it because it always jumps to privilege level 0.
-                * A normal Guest won't try it because we don't advertise it in
-                * CPUID, but a malicious Guest (or malicious Guest userspace
-                * program) could, so we tell the CPU to disable it before
-                * running the Guest. */
-               if (boot_cpu_has(X86_FEATURE_SEP))
-                       wrmsr(MSR_IA32_SYSENTER_CS, 0, 0);
-
-               /* Now we actually run the Guest.  It will pop back out when
-                * something interesting happens, and we can examine its
-                * registers to see what it was doing. */
-               run_guest_once(lg, lguest_pages(raw_smp_processor_id()));
-
-               /* The "regs" pointer contains two extra entries which are not
-                * really registers: a trap number which says what interrupt or
-                * trap made the switcher code come back, and an error code
-                * which some traps set.  */
-
-               /* If the Guest page faulted, then the cr2 register will tell
-                * us the bad virtual address.  We have to grab this now,
-                * because once we re-enable interrupts an interrupt could
-                * fault and thus overwrite cr2, or we could even move off to a
-                * different CPU. */
-               if (lg->regs->trapnum == 14)
-                       cr2 = read_cr2();
-               /* Similarly, if we took a trap because the Guest used the FPU,
-                * we have to restore the FPU it expects to see. */
-               else if (lg->regs->trapnum == 7)
-                       math_state_restore();
-
-               /* Restore SYSENTER if it's supposed to be on. */
-               if (boot_cpu_has(X86_FEATURE_SEP))
-                       wrmsr(MSR_IA32_SYSENTER_CS, __KERNEL_CS, 0);
+               /* Actually run the Guest until something happens. */
+               lguest_arch_run_guest(cpu);
 
                /* Now we're ready to be interrupted or moved to other CPUs */
                local_irq_enable();
 
-               /* OK, so what happened? */
-               switch (lg->regs->trapnum) {
-               case 13: /* We've intercepted a GPF. */
-                       /* Check if this was one of those annoying IN or OUT
-                        * instructions which we need to emulate.  If so, we
-                        * just go back into the Guest after we've done it. */
-                       if (lg->regs->errcode == 0) {
-                               if (emulate_insn(lg))
-                                       continue;
-                       }
-                       break;
-               case 14: /* We've intercepted a page fault. */
-                       /* The Guest accessed a virtual address that wasn't
-                        * mapped.  This happens a lot: we don't actually set
-                        * up most of the page tables for the Guest at all when
-                        * we start: as it runs it asks for more and more, and
-                        * we set them up as required. In this case, we don't
-                        * even tell the Guest that the fault happened.
-                        *
-                        * The errcode tells whether this was a read or a
-                        * write, and whether kernel or userspace code. */
-                       if (demand_page(lg, cr2, lg->regs->errcode))
-                               continue;
-
-                       /* OK, it's really not there (or not OK): the Guest
-                        * needs to know.  We write out the cr2 value so it
-                        * knows where the fault occurred.
-                        *
-                        * Note that if the Guest were really messed up, this
-                        * could happen before it's done the INITIALIZE
-                        * hypercall, so lg->lguest_data will be NULL */
-                       if (lg->lguest_data
-                           && put_user(cr2, &lg->lguest_data->cr2))
-                               kill_guest(lg, "Writing cr2");
-                       break;
-               case 7: /* We've intercepted a Device Not Available fault. */
-                       /* If the Guest doesn't want to know, we already
-                        * restored the Floating Point Unit, so we just
-                        * continue without telling it. */
-                       if (!lg->ts)
-                               continue;
-                       break;
-               case 32 ... 255:
-                       /* These values mean a real interrupt occurred, in
-                        * which case the Host handler has already been run.
-                        * We just do a friendly check if another process
-                        * should now be run, then fall through to loop
-                        * around: */
-                       cond_resched();
-               case LGUEST_TRAP_ENTRY: /* Handled at top of loop */
-                       continue;
-               }
+               /* Now we deal with whatever happened to the Guest. */
+               lguest_arch_handle_trap(cpu);
+       }
 
-               /* If we get here, it's a trap the Guest wants to know
-                * about. */
-               if (deliver_trap(lg, lg->regs->trapnum))
-                       continue;
+       /* Special case: Guest is 'dead' but wants a reboot. */
+       if (cpu->lg->dead == ERR_PTR(-ERESTART))
+               return -ERESTART;
 
-               /* If the Guest doesn't have a handler (either it hasn't
-                * registered any yet, or it's one of the faults we don't let
-                * it handle), it dies with a cryptic error message. */
-               kill_guest(lg, "unhandled trap %li at %#lx (%#lx)",
-                          lg->regs->trapnum, lg->regs->eip,
-                          lg->regs->trapnum == 14 ? cr2 : lg->regs->errcode);
-       }
        /* The Guest is dead => "No such file or directory" */
        return -ENOENT;
 }
 
-/* Now we can look at each of the routines this calls, in increasing order of
- * complexity: do_hypercalls(), emulate_insn(), maybe_do_interrupt(),
- * deliver_trap() and demand_page().  After all those, we'll be ready to
- * examine the Switcher, and our philosophical understanding of the Host/Guest
- * duality will be complete. :*/
-static void adjust_pge(void *on)
-{
-       if (on)
-               write_cr4(read_cr4() | X86_CR4_PGE);
-       else
-               write_cr4(read_cr4() & ~X86_CR4_PGE);
-}
-
 /*H:000
  * Welcome to the Host!
  *
@@ -678,79 +267,57 @@ static int __init init(void)
 
        /* Lguest can't run under Xen, VMI or itself.  It does Tricky Stuff. */
        if (paravirt_enabled()) {
-               printk("lguest is afraid of %s\n", pv_info.name);
+               printk("lguest is afraid of being a guest\n");
                return -EPERM;
        }
 
        /* First we put the Switcher up in very high virtual memory. */
        err = map_switcher();
        if (err)
-               return err;
+               goto out;
 
        /* Now we set up the pagetable implementation for the Guests. */
        err = init_pagetables(switcher_page, SHARED_SWITCHER_PAGES);
-       if (err) {
-               unmap_switcher();
-               return err;
-       }
+       if (err)
+               goto unmap;
 
-       /* The I/O subsystem needs some things initialized. */
-       lguest_io_init();
+       /* We might need to reserve an interrupt vector. */
+       err = init_interrupts();
+       if (err)
+               goto free_pgtables;
 
        /* /dev/lguest needs to be registered. */
        err = lguest_device_init();
-       if (err) {
-               free_pagetables();
-               unmap_switcher();
-               return err;
-       }
+       if (err)
+               goto free_interrupts;
 
-       /* Finally, we need to turn off "Page Global Enable".  PGE is an
-        * optimization where page table entries are specially marked to show
-        * they never change.  The Host kernel marks all the kernel pages this
-        * way because it's always present, even when userspace is running.
-        *
-        * Lguest breaks this: unbeknownst to the rest of the Host kernel, we
-        * switch to the Guest kernel.  If you don't disable this on all CPUs,
-        * you'll get really weird bugs that you'll chase for two days.
-        *
-        * I used to turn PGE off every time we switched to the Guest and back
-        * on when we return, but that slowed the Switcher down noticibly. */
-
-       /* We don't need the complexity of CPUs coming and going while we're
-        * doing this. */
-       lock_cpu_hotplug();
-       if (cpu_has_pge) { /* We have a broader idea of "global". */
-               /* Remember that this was originally set (for cleanup). */
-               cpu_had_pge = 1;
-               /* adjust_pge is a helper function which sets or unsets the PGE
-                * bit on its CPU, depending on the argument (0 == unset). */
-               on_each_cpu(adjust_pge, (void *)0, 0, 1);
-               /* Turn off the feature in the global feature set. */
-               clear_bit(X86_FEATURE_PGE, boot_cpu_data.x86_capability);
-       }
-       unlock_cpu_hotplug();
+       /* Finally we do some architecture-specific setup. */
+       lguest_arch_host_init();
 
        /* All good! */
        return 0;
+
+free_interrupts:
+       free_interrupts();
+free_pgtables:
+       free_pagetables();
+unmap:
+       unmap_switcher();
+out:
+       return err;
 }
 
 /* Cleaning up is just the same code, backwards.  With a little French. */
 static void __exit fini(void)
 {
        lguest_device_remove();
+       free_interrupts();
        free_pagetables();
        unmap_switcher();
 
-       /* If we had PGE before we started, turn it back on now. */
-       lock_cpu_hotplug();
-       if (cpu_had_pge) {
-               set_bit(X86_FEATURE_PGE, boot_cpu_data.x86_capability);
-               /* adjust_pge's argument "1" means set PGE. */
-               on_each_cpu(adjust_pge, (void *)1, 0, 1);
-       }
-       unlock_cpu_hotplug();
+       lguest_arch_host_fini();
 }
+/*:*/
 
 /* The Host side of lguest can be a module.  This is a nice way for people to
  * play with it.  */