Fix typos in /Documentation : Misc
[linux-3.10.git] / Documentation / power / swsusp.txt
index 08c79d4..e635e6f 100644 (file)
@@ -17,6 +17,12 @@ Some warnings, first.
  * but it will probably only crash.
  *
  * (*) suspend/resume support is needed to make it safe.
+ *
+ * If you have any filesystems on USB devices mounted before software suspend,
+ * they won't be accessible after resume and you may lose data, as though
+ * you have unplugged the USB devices with mounted filesystems on them;
+ * see the FAQ below for details.  (This is not true for more traditional
+ * power states like "standby", which normally don't turn USB off.)
 
 You need to append resume=/dev/your_swap_partition to kernel command
 line. Then you suspend by
@@ -27,19 +33,18 @@ echo shutdown > /sys/power/disk; echo disk > /sys/power/state
 
 echo platform > /sys/power/disk; echo disk > /sys/power/state
 
-If you want to limit the suspend image size to N megabytes, do
+. If you have SATA disks, you'll need recent kernels with SATA suspend
+support. For suspend and resume to work, make sure your disk drivers
+are built into kernel -- not modules. [There's way to make
+suspend/resume with modular disk drivers, see FAQ, but you probably
+should not do that.]
+
+If you want to limit the suspend image size to N bytes, do
 
 echo N > /sys/power/image_size
 
 before suspend (it is limited to 500 MB by default).
 
-Encrypted suspend image:
-------------------------
-If you want to store your suspend image encrypted with a temporary
-key to prevent data gathering after resume you must compile
-crypto and the aes algorithm into the kernel - modules won't work
-as they cannot be loaded at resume time.
-
 
 Article about goals and implementation of Software Suspend for Linux
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
@@ -148,10 +153,10 @@ add:
 
 If the thread is needed for writing the image to storage, you should
 instead set the PF_NOFREEZE process flag when creating the thread (and
-be very carefull).
+be very careful).
 
 
-Q: What is the difference between between "platform", "shutdown" and
+Q: What is the difference between "platform", "shutdown" and
 "firmware" in /sys/power/disk?
 
 A:
@@ -170,8 +175,8 @@ reliable.
 Q: I do not understand why you have such strong objections to idea of
 selective suspend.
 
-A: Do selective suspend during runtime power managment, that's okay. But
-its useless for suspend-to-disk. (And I do not see how you could use
+A: Do selective suspend during runtime power management, that's okay. But
+it's useless for suspend-to-disk. (And I do not see how you could use
 it for suspend-to-ram, I hope you do not want that).
 
 Lets see, so you suggest to
@@ -200,13 +205,13 @@ Q: There don't seem to be any generally useful behavioral
 distinctions between SUSPEND and FREEZE.
 
 A: Doing SUSPEND when you are asked to do FREEZE is always correct,
-but it may be unneccessarily slow. If you want USB to stay simple,
+but it may be unneccessarily slow. If you want your driver to stay simple,
 slowness may not matter to you. It can always be fixed later.
 
 For devices like disk it does matter, you do not want to spindown for
 FREEZE.
 
-Q: After resuming, system is paging heavilly, leading to very bad interactivity.
+Q: After resuming, system is paging heavily, leading to very bad interactivity.
 
 A: Try running
 
@@ -333,4 +338,84 @@ init=/bin/bash, then swapon and starting suspend sequence manually
 usually does the trick. Then it is good idea to try with latest
 vanilla kernel.
 
-
+Q: How can distributions ship a swsusp-supporting kernel with modular
+disk drivers (especially SATA)?
+
+A: Well, it can be done, load the drivers, then do echo into
+/sys/power/disk/resume file from initrd. Be sure not to mount
+anything, not even read-only mount, or you are going to lose your
+data.
+
+Q: How do I make suspend more verbose?
+
+A: If you want to see any non-error kernel messages on the virtual
+terminal the kernel switches to during suspend, you have to set the
+kernel console loglevel to at least 4 (KERN_WARNING), for example by
+doing
+
+       # save the old loglevel
+       read LOGLEVEL DUMMY < /proc/sys/kernel/printk
+       # set the loglevel so we see the progress bar.
+       # if the level is higher than needed, we leave it alone.
+       if [ $LOGLEVEL -lt 5 ]; then
+               echo 5 > /proc/sys/kernel/printk
+               fi
+
+        IMG_SZ=0
+        read IMG_SZ < /sys/power/image_size
+        echo -n disk > /sys/power/state
+        RET=$?
+        #
+        # the logic here is:
+        # if image_size > 0 (without kernel support, IMG_SZ will be zero),
+        # then try again with image_size set to zero.
+       if [ $RET -ne 0 -a $IMG_SZ -ne 0 ]; then # try again with minimal image size
+                echo 0 > /sys/power/image_size
+                echo -n disk > /sys/power/state
+                RET=$?
+        fi
+
+       # restore previous loglevel
+       echo $LOGLEVEL > /proc/sys/kernel/printk
+       exit $RET
+
+Q: Is this true that if I have a mounted filesystem on a USB device and
+I suspend to disk, I can lose data unless the filesystem has been mounted
+with "sync"?
+
+A: That's right ... if you disconnect that device, you may lose data.
+In fact, even with "-o sync" you can lose data if your programs have
+information in buffers they haven't written out to a disk you disconnect,
+or if you disconnect before the device finished saving data you wrote.
+
+Software suspend normally powers down USB controllers, which is equivalent
+to disconnecting all USB devices attached to your system.
+
+Your system might well support low-power modes for its USB controllers
+while the system is asleep, maintaining the connection, using true sleep
+modes like "suspend-to-RAM" or "standby".  (Don't write "disk" to the
+/sys/power/state file; write "standby" or "mem".)  We've not seen any
+hardware that can use these modes through software suspend, although in
+theory some systems might support "platform" or "firmware" modes that
+won't break the USB connections.
+
+Remember that it's always a bad idea to unplug a disk drive containing a
+mounted filesystem.  That's true even when your system is asleep!  The
+safest thing is to unmount all filesystems on removable media (such USB,
+Firewire, CompactFlash, MMC, external SATA, or even IDE hotplug bays)
+before suspending; then remount them after resuming.
+
+Q: I upgraded the kernel from 2.6.15 to 2.6.16. Both kernels were
+compiled with the similar configuration files. Anyway I found that
+suspend to disk (and resume) is much slower on 2.6.16 compared to
+2.6.15. Any idea for why that might happen or how can I speed it up?
+
+A: This is because the size of the suspend image is now greater than
+for 2.6.15 (by saving more data we can get more responsive system
+after resume).
+
+There's the /sys/power/image_size knob that controls the size of the
+image.  If you set it to 0 (eg. by echo 0 > /sys/power/image_size as
+root), the 2.6.15 behavior should be restored.  If it is still too
+slow, take a look at suspend.sf.net -- userland suspend is faster and
+supports LZF compression to speed it up further.