Introduce guest mem offset, static link example launcher
[linux-3.10.git] / drivers / lguest / core.c
1 /*P:400 This contains run_guest() which actually calls into the Host<->Guest
2  * Switcher and analyzes the return, such as determining if the Guest wants the
3  * Host to do something.  This file also contains useful helper routines, and a
4  * couple of non-obvious setup and teardown pieces which were implemented after
5  * days of debugging pain. :*/
6 #include <linux/module.h>
7 #include <linux/stringify.h>
8 #include <linux/stddef.h>
9 #include <linux/io.h>
10 #include <linux/mm.h>
11 #include <linux/vmalloc.h>
12 #include <linux/cpu.h>
13 #include <linux/freezer.h>
14 #include <asm/paravirt.h>
15 #include <asm/desc.h>
16 #include <asm/pgtable.h>
17 #include <asm/uaccess.h>
18 #include <asm/poll.h>
19 #include <asm/highmem.h>
20 #include <asm/asm-offsets.h>
21 #include <asm/i387.h>
22 #include "lg.h"
23
24 /* Found in switcher.S */
25 extern char start_switcher_text[], end_switcher_text[], switch_to_guest[];
26 extern unsigned long default_idt_entries[];
27
28 /* Every guest maps the core switcher code. */
29 #define SHARED_SWITCHER_PAGES \
30         DIV_ROUND_UP(end_switcher_text - start_switcher_text, PAGE_SIZE)
31 /* Pages for switcher itself, then two pages per cpu */
32 #define TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES (SHARED_SWITCHER_PAGES + 2 * NR_CPUS)
33
34 /* We map at -4M for ease of mapping into the guest (one PTE page). */
35 #define SWITCHER_ADDR 0xFFC00000
36
37 static struct vm_struct *switcher_vma;
38 static struct page **switcher_page;
39
40 static int cpu_had_pge;
41 static struct {
42         unsigned long offset;
43         unsigned short segment;
44 } lguest_entry;
45
46 /* This One Big lock protects all inter-guest data structures. */
47 DEFINE_MUTEX(lguest_lock);
48 static DEFINE_PER_CPU(struct lguest *, last_guest);
49
50 /* FIXME: Make dynamic. */
51 #define MAX_LGUEST_GUESTS 16
52 struct lguest lguests[MAX_LGUEST_GUESTS];
53
54 /* Offset from where switcher.S was compiled to where we've copied it */
55 static unsigned long switcher_offset(void)
56 {
57         return SWITCHER_ADDR - (unsigned long)start_switcher_text;
58 }
59
60 /* This cpu's struct lguest_pages. */
61 static struct lguest_pages *lguest_pages(unsigned int cpu)
62 {
63         return &(((struct lguest_pages *)
64                   (SWITCHER_ADDR + SHARED_SWITCHER_PAGES*PAGE_SIZE))[cpu]);
65 }
66
67 /*H:010 We need to set up the Switcher at a high virtual address.  Remember the
68  * Switcher is a few hundred bytes of assembler code which actually changes the
69  * CPU to run the Guest, and then changes back to the Host when a trap or
70  * interrupt happens.
71  *
72  * The Switcher code must be at the same virtual address in the Guest as the
73  * Host since it will be running as the switchover occurs.
74  *
75  * Trying to map memory at a particular address is an unusual thing to do, so
76  * it's not a simple one-liner.  We also set up the per-cpu parts of the
77  * Switcher here.
78  */
79 static __init int map_switcher(void)
80 {
81         int i, err;
82         struct page **pagep;
83
84         /*
85          * Map the Switcher in to high memory.
86          *
87          * It turns out that if we choose the address 0xFFC00000 (4MB under the
88          * top virtual address), it makes setting up the page tables really
89          * easy.
90          */
91
92         /* We allocate an array of "struct page"s.  map_vm_area() wants the
93          * pages in this form, rather than just an array of pointers. */
94         switcher_page = kmalloc(sizeof(switcher_page[0])*TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES,
95                                 GFP_KERNEL);
96         if (!switcher_page) {
97                 err = -ENOMEM;
98                 goto out;
99         }
100
101         /* Now we actually allocate the pages.  The Guest will see these pages,
102          * so we make sure they're zeroed. */
103         for (i = 0; i < TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES; i++) {
104                 unsigned long addr = get_zeroed_page(GFP_KERNEL);
105                 if (!addr) {
106                         err = -ENOMEM;
107                         goto free_some_pages;
108                 }
109                 switcher_page[i] = virt_to_page(addr);
110         }
111
112         /* Now we reserve the "virtual memory area" we want: 0xFFC00000
113          * (SWITCHER_ADDR).  We might not get it in theory, but in practice
114          * it's worked so far. */
115         switcher_vma = __get_vm_area(TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES * PAGE_SIZE,
116                                        VM_ALLOC, SWITCHER_ADDR, VMALLOC_END);
117         if (!switcher_vma) {
118                 err = -ENOMEM;
119                 printk("lguest: could not map switcher pages high\n");
120                 goto free_pages;
121         }
122
123         /* This code actually sets up the pages we've allocated to appear at
124          * SWITCHER_ADDR.  map_vm_area() takes the vma we allocated above, the
125          * kind of pages we're mapping (kernel pages), and a pointer to our
126          * array of struct pages.  It increments that pointer, but we don't
127          * care. */
128         pagep = switcher_page;
129         err = map_vm_area(switcher_vma, PAGE_KERNEL, &pagep);
130         if (err) {
131                 printk("lguest: map_vm_area failed: %i\n", err);
132                 goto free_vma;
133         }
134
135         /* Now the switcher is mapped at the right address, we can't fail!
136          * Copy in the compiled-in Switcher code (from switcher.S). */
137         memcpy(switcher_vma->addr, start_switcher_text,
138                end_switcher_text - start_switcher_text);
139
140         /* Most of the switcher.S doesn't care that it's been moved; on Intel,
141          * jumps are relative, and it doesn't access any references to external
142          * code or data.
143          *
144          * The only exception is the interrupt handlers in switcher.S: their
145          * addresses are placed in a table (default_idt_entries), so we need to
146          * update the table with the new addresses.  switcher_offset() is a
147          * convenience function which returns the distance between the builtin
148          * switcher code and the high-mapped copy we just made. */
149         for (i = 0; i < IDT_ENTRIES; i++)
150                 default_idt_entries[i] += switcher_offset();
151
152         /*
153          * Set up the Switcher's per-cpu areas.
154          *
155          * Each CPU gets two pages of its own within the high-mapped region
156          * (aka. "struct lguest_pages").  Much of this can be initialized now,
157          * but some depends on what Guest we are running (which is set up in
158          * copy_in_guest_info()).
159          */
160         for_each_possible_cpu(i) {
161                 /* lguest_pages() returns this CPU's two pages. */
162                 struct lguest_pages *pages = lguest_pages(i);
163                 /* This is a convenience pointer to make the code fit one
164                  * statement to a line. */
165                 struct lguest_ro_state *state = &pages->state;
166
167                 /* The Global Descriptor Table: the Host has a different one
168                  * for each CPU.  We keep a descriptor for the GDT which says
169                  * where it is and how big it is (the size is actually the last
170                  * byte, not the size, hence the "-1"). */
171                 state->host_gdt_desc.size = GDT_SIZE-1;
172                 state->host_gdt_desc.address = (long)get_cpu_gdt_table(i);
173
174                 /* All CPUs on the Host use the same Interrupt Descriptor
175                  * Table, so we just use store_idt(), which gets this CPU's IDT
176                  * descriptor. */
177                 store_idt(&state->host_idt_desc);
178
179                 /* The descriptors for the Guest's GDT and IDT can be filled
180                  * out now, too.  We copy the GDT & IDT into ->guest_gdt and
181                  * ->guest_idt before actually running the Guest. */
182                 state->guest_idt_desc.size = sizeof(state->guest_idt)-1;
183                 state->guest_idt_desc.address = (long)&state->guest_idt;
184                 state->guest_gdt_desc.size = sizeof(state->guest_gdt)-1;
185                 state->guest_gdt_desc.address = (long)&state->guest_gdt;
186
187                 /* We know where we want the stack to be when the Guest enters
188                  * the switcher: in pages->regs.  The stack grows upwards, so
189                  * we start it at the end of that structure. */
190                 state->guest_tss.esp0 = (long)(&pages->regs + 1);
191                 /* And this is the GDT entry to use for the stack: we keep a
192                  * couple of special LGUEST entries. */
193                 state->guest_tss.ss0 = LGUEST_DS;
194
195                 /* x86 can have a finegrained bitmap which indicates what I/O
196                  * ports the process can use.  We set it to the end of our
197                  * structure, meaning "none". */
198                 state->guest_tss.io_bitmap_base = sizeof(state->guest_tss);
199
200                 /* Some GDT entries are the same across all Guests, so we can
201                  * set them up now. */
202                 setup_default_gdt_entries(state);
203                 /* Most IDT entries are the same for all Guests, too.*/
204                 setup_default_idt_entries(state, default_idt_entries);
205
206                 /* The Host needs to be able to use the LGUEST segments on this
207                  * CPU, too, so put them in the Host GDT. */
208                 get_cpu_gdt_table(i)[GDT_ENTRY_LGUEST_CS] = FULL_EXEC_SEGMENT;
209                 get_cpu_gdt_table(i)[GDT_ENTRY_LGUEST_DS] = FULL_SEGMENT;
210         }
211
212         /* In the Switcher, we want the %cs segment register to use the
213          * LGUEST_CS GDT entry: we've put that in the Host and Guest GDTs, so
214          * it will be undisturbed when we switch.  To change %cs and jump we
215          * need this structure to feed to Intel's "lcall" instruction. */
216         lguest_entry.offset = (long)switch_to_guest + switcher_offset();
217         lguest_entry.segment = LGUEST_CS;
218
219         printk(KERN_INFO "lguest: mapped switcher at %p\n",
220                switcher_vma->addr);
221         /* And we succeeded... */
222         return 0;
223
224 free_vma:
225         vunmap(switcher_vma->addr);
226 free_pages:
227         i = TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES;
228 free_some_pages:
229         for (--i; i >= 0; i--)
230                 __free_pages(switcher_page[i], 0);
231         kfree(switcher_page);
232 out:
233         return err;
234 }
235 /*:*/
236
237 /* Cleaning up the mapping when the module is unloaded is almost...
238  * too easy. */
239 static void unmap_switcher(void)
240 {
241         unsigned int i;
242
243         /* vunmap() undoes *both* map_vm_area() and __get_vm_area(). */
244         vunmap(switcher_vma->addr);
245         /* Now we just need to free the pages we copied the switcher into */
246         for (i = 0; i < TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES; i++)
247                 __free_pages(switcher_page[i], 0);
248 }
249
250 /*H:130 Our Guest is usually so well behaved; it never tries to do things it
251  * isn't allowed to.  Unfortunately, Linux's paravirtual infrastructure isn't
252  * quite complete, because it doesn't contain replacements for the Intel I/O
253  * instructions.  As a result, the Guest sometimes fumbles across one during
254  * the boot process as it probes for various things which are usually attached
255  * to a PC.
256  *
257  * When the Guest uses one of these instructions, we get trap #13 (General
258  * Protection Fault) and come here.  We see if it's one of those troublesome
259  * instructions and skip over it.  We return true if we did. */
260 static int emulate_insn(struct lguest *lg)
261 {
262         u8 insn;
263         unsigned int insnlen = 0, in = 0, shift = 0;
264         /* The eip contains the *virtual* address of the Guest's instruction:
265          * guest_pa just subtracts the Guest's page_offset. */
266         unsigned long physaddr = guest_pa(lg, lg->regs->eip);
267
268         /* The guest_pa() function only works for Guest kernel addresses, but
269          * that's all we're trying to do anyway. */
270         if (lg->regs->eip < lg->page_offset)
271                 return 0;
272
273         /* Decoding x86 instructions is icky. */
274         lgread(lg, &insn, physaddr, 1);
275
276         /* 0x66 is an "operand prefix".  It means it's using the upper 16 bits
277            of the eax register. */
278         if (insn == 0x66) {
279                 shift = 16;
280                 /* The instruction is 1 byte so far, read the next byte. */
281                 insnlen = 1;
282                 lgread(lg, &insn, physaddr + insnlen, 1);
283         }
284
285         /* We can ignore the lower bit for the moment and decode the 4 opcodes
286          * we need to emulate. */
287         switch (insn & 0xFE) {
288         case 0xE4: /* in     <next byte>,%al */
289                 insnlen += 2;
290                 in = 1;
291                 break;
292         case 0xEC: /* in     (%dx),%al */
293                 insnlen += 1;
294                 in = 1;
295                 break;
296         case 0xE6: /* out    %al,<next byte> */
297                 insnlen += 2;
298                 break;
299         case 0xEE: /* out    %al,(%dx) */
300                 insnlen += 1;
301                 break;
302         default:
303                 /* OK, we don't know what this is, can't emulate. */
304                 return 0;
305         }
306
307         /* If it was an "IN" instruction, they expect the result to be read
308          * into %eax, so we change %eax.  We always return all-ones, which
309          * traditionally means "there's nothing there". */
310         if (in) {
311                 /* Lower bit tells is whether it's a 16 or 32 bit access */
312                 if (insn & 0x1)
313                         lg->regs->eax = 0xFFFFFFFF;
314                 else
315                         lg->regs->eax |= (0xFFFF << shift);
316         }
317         /* Finally, we've "done" the instruction, so move past it. */
318         lg->regs->eip += insnlen;
319         /* Success! */
320         return 1;
321 }
322 /*:*/
323
324 /*L:305
325  * Dealing With Guest Memory.
326  *
327  * When the Guest gives us (what it thinks is) a physical address, we can use
328  * the normal copy_from_user() & copy_to_user() on the corresponding place in
329  * the memory region allocated by the Launcher.
330  *
331  * But we can't trust the Guest: it might be trying to access the Launcher
332  * code.  We have to check that the range is below the pfn_limit the Launcher
333  * gave us.  We have to make sure that addr + len doesn't give us a false
334  * positive by overflowing, too. */
335 int lguest_address_ok(const struct lguest *lg,
336                       unsigned long addr, unsigned long len)
337 {
338         return (addr+len) / PAGE_SIZE < lg->pfn_limit && (addr+len >= addr);
339 }
340
341 /* This is a convenient routine to get a 32-bit value from the Guest (a very
342  * common operation).  Here we can see how useful the kill_lguest() routine we
343  * met in the Launcher can be: we return a random value (0) instead of needing
344  * to return an error. */
345 u32 lgread_u32(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long addr)
346 {
347         u32 val = 0;
348
349         /* Don't let them access lguest binary. */
350         if (!lguest_address_ok(lg, addr, sizeof(val))
351             || get_user(val, (u32 *)(lg->mem_base + addr)) != 0)
352                 kill_guest(lg, "bad read address %#lx: pfn_limit=%u membase=%p", addr, lg->pfn_limit, lg->mem_base);
353         return val;
354 }
355
356 /* Same thing for writing a value. */
357 void lgwrite_u32(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long addr, u32 val)
358 {
359         if (!lguest_address_ok(lg, addr, sizeof(val))
360             || put_user(val, (u32 *)(lg->mem_base + addr)) != 0)
361                 kill_guest(lg, "bad write address %#lx", addr);
362 }
363
364 /* This routine is more generic, and copies a range of Guest bytes into a
365  * buffer.  If the copy_from_user() fails, we fill the buffer with zeroes, so
366  * the caller doesn't end up using uninitialized kernel memory. */
367 void lgread(struct lguest *lg, void *b, unsigned long addr, unsigned bytes)
368 {
369         if (!lguest_address_ok(lg, addr, bytes)
370             || copy_from_user(b, lg->mem_base + addr, bytes) != 0) {
371                 /* copy_from_user should do this, but as we rely on it... */
372                 memset(b, 0, bytes);
373                 kill_guest(lg, "bad read address %#lx len %u", addr, bytes);
374         }
375 }
376
377 /* Similarly, our generic routine to copy into a range of Guest bytes. */
378 void lgwrite(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long addr, const void *b,
379              unsigned bytes)
380 {
381         if (!lguest_address_ok(lg, addr, bytes)
382             || copy_to_user(lg->mem_base + addr, b, bytes) != 0)
383                 kill_guest(lg, "bad write address %#lx len %u", addr, bytes);
384 }
385 /* (end of memory access helper routines) :*/
386
387 static void set_ts(void)
388 {
389         u32 cr0;
390
391         cr0 = read_cr0();
392         if (!(cr0 & 8))
393                 write_cr0(cr0|8);
394 }
395
396 /*S:010
397  * We are getting close to the Switcher.
398  *
399  * Remember that each CPU has two pages which are visible to the Guest when it
400  * runs on that CPU.  This has to contain the state for that Guest: we copy the
401  * state in just before we run the Guest.
402  *
403  * Each Guest has "changed" flags which indicate what has changed in the Guest
404  * since it last ran.  We saw this set in interrupts_and_traps.c and
405  * segments.c.
406  */
407 static void copy_in_guest_info(struct lguest *lg, struct lguest_pages *pages)
408 {
409         /* Copying all this data can be quite expensive.  We usually run the
410          * same Guest we ran last time (and that Guest hasn't run anywhere else
411          * meanwhile).  If that's not the case, we pretend everything in the
412          * Guest has changed. */
413         if (__get_cpu_var(last_guest) != lg || lg->last_pages != pages) {
414                 __get_cpu_var(last_guest) = lg;
415                 lg->last_pages = pages;
416                 lg->changed = CHANGED_ALL;
417         }
418
419         /* These copies are pretty cheap, so we do them unconditionally: */
420         /* Save the current Host top-level page directory. */
421         pages->state.host_cr3 = __pa(current->mm->pgd);
422         /* Set up the Guest's page tables to see this CPU's pages (and no
423          * other CPU's pages). */
424         map_switcher_in_guest(lg, pages);
425         /* Set up the two "TSS" members which tell the CPU what stack to use
426          * for traps which do directly into the Guest (ie. traps at privilege
427          * level 1). */
428         pages->state.guest_tss.esp1 = lg->esp1;
429         pages->state.guest_tss.ss1 = lg->ss1;
430
431         /* Copy direct-to-Guest trap entries. */
432         if (lg->changed & CHANGED_IDT)
433                 copy_traps(lg, pages->state.guest_idt, default_idt_entries);
434
435         /* Copy all GDT entries which the Guest can change. */
436         if (lg->changed & CHANGED_GDT)
437                 copy_gdt(lg, pages->state.guest_gdt);
438         /* If only the TLS entries have changed, copy them. */
439         else if (lg->changed & CHANGED_GDT_TLS)
440                 copy_gdt_tls(lg, pages->state.guest_gdt);
441
442         /* Mark the Guest as unchanged for next time. */
443         lg->changed = 0;
444 }
445
446 /* Finally: the code to actually call into the Switcher to run the Guest. */
447 static void run_guest_once(struct lguest *lg, struct lguest_pages *pages)
448 {
449         /* This is a dummy value we need for GCC's sake. */
450         unsigned int clobber;
451
452         /* Copy the guest-specific information into this CPU's "struct
453          * lguest_pages". */
454         copy_in_guest_info(lg, pages);
455
456         /* Set the trap number to 256 (impossible value).  If we fault while
457          * switching to the Guest (bad segment registers or bug), this will
458          * cause us to abort the Guest. */
459         lg->regs->trapnum = 256;
460
461         /* Now: we push the "eflags" register on the stack, then do an "lcall".
462          * This is how we change from using the kernel code segment to using
463          * the dedicated lguest code segment, as well as jumping into the
464          * Switcher.
465          *
466          * The lcall also pushes the old code segment (KERNEL_CS) onto the
467          * stack, then the address of this call.  This stack layout happens to
468          * exactly match the stack of an interrupt... */
469         asm volatile("pushf; lcall *lguest_entry"
470                      /* This is how we tell GCC that %eax ("a") and %ebx ("b")
471                       * are changed by this routine.  The "=" means output. */
472                      : "=a"(clobber), "=b"(clobber)
473                      /* %eax contains the pages pointer.  ("0" refers to the
474                       * 0-th argument above, ie "a").  %ebx contains the
475                       * physical address of the Guest's top-level page
476                       * directory. */
477                      : "0"(pages), "1"(__pa(lg->pgdirs[lg->pgdidx].pgdir))
478                      /* We tell gcc that all these registers could change,
479                       * which means we don't have to save and restore them in
480                       * the Switcher. */
481                      : "memory", "%edx", "%ecx", "%edi", "%esi");
482 }
483 /*:*/
484
485 /*H:030 Let's jump straight to the the main loop which runs the Guest.
486  * Remember, this is called by the Launcher reading /dev/lguest, and we keep
487  * going around and around until something interesting happens. */
488 int run_guest(struct lguest *lg, unsigned long __user *user)
489 {
490         /* We stop running once the Guest is dead. */
491         while (!lg->dead) {
492                 /* We need to initialize this, otherwise gcc complains.  It's
493                  * not (yet) clever enough to see that it's initialized when we
494                  * need it. */
495                 unsigned int cr2 = 0; /* Damn gcc */
496
497                 /* First we run any hypercalls the Guest wants done: either in
498                  * the hypercall ring in "struct lguest_data", or directly by
499                  * using int 31 (LGUEST_TRAP_ENTRY). */
500                 do_hypercalls(lg);
501                 /* It's possible the Guest did a SEND_DMA hypercall to the
502                  * Launcher, in which case we return from the read() now. */
503                 if (lg->dma_is_pending) {
504                         if (put_user(lg->pending_dma, user) ||
505                             put_user(lg->pending_key, user+1))
506                                 return -EFAULT;
507                         return sizeof(unsigned long)*2;
508                 }
509
510                 /* Check for signals */
511                 if (signal_pending(current))
512                         return -ERESTARTSYS;
513
514                 /* If Waker set break_out, return to Launcher. */
515                 if (lg->break_out)
516                         return -EAGAIN;
517
518                 /* Check if there are any interrupts which can be delivered
519                  * now: if so, this sets up the hander to be executed when we
520                  * next run the Guest. */
521                 maybe_do_interrupt(lg);
522
523                 /* All long-lived kernel loops need to check with this horrible
524                  * thing called the freezer.  If the Host is trying to suspend,
525                  * it stops us. */
526                 try_to_freeze();
527
528                 /* Just make absolutely sure the Guest is still alive.  One of
529                  * those hypercalls could have been fatal, for example. */
530                 if (lg->dead)
531                         break;
532
533                 /* If the Guest asked to be stopped, we sleep.  The Guest's
534                  * clock timer or LHCALL_BREAK from the Waker will wake us. */
535                 if (lg->halted) {
536                         set_current_state(TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE);
537                         schedule();
538                         continue;
539                 }
540
541                 /* OK, now we're ready to jump into the Guest.  First we put up
542                  * the "Do Not Disturb" sign: */
543                 local_irq_disable();
544
545                 /* Remember the awfully-named TS bit?  If the Guest has asked
546                  * to set it we set it now, so we can trap and pass that trap
547                  * to the Guest if it uses the FPU. */
548                 if (lg->ts)
549                         set_ts();
550
551                 /* SYSENTER is an optimized way of doing system calls.  We
552                  * can't allow it because it always jumps to privilege level 0.
553                  * A normal Guest won't try it because we don't advertise it in
554                  * CPUID, but a malicious Guest (or malicious Guest userspace
555                  * program) could, so we tell the CPU to disable it before
556                  * running the Guest. */
557                 if (boot_cpu_has(X86_FEATURE_SEP))
558                         wrmsr(MSR_IA32_SYSENTER_CS, 0, 0);
559
560                 /* Now we actually run the Guest.  It will pop back out when
561                  * something interesting happens, and we can examine its
562                  * registers to see what it was doing. */
563                 run_guest_once(lg, lguest_pages(raw_smp_processor_id()));
564
565                 /* The "regs" pointer contains two extra entries which are not
566                  * really registers: a trap number which says what interrupt or
567                  * trap made the switcher code come back, and an error code
568                  * which some traps set.  */
569
570                 /* If the Guest page faulted, then the cr2 register will tell
571                  * us the bad virtual address.  We have to grab this now,
572                  * because once we re-enable interrupts an interrupt could
573                  * fault and thus overwrite cr2, or we could even move off to a
574                  * different CPU. */
575                 if (lg->regs->trapnum == 14)
576                         cr2 = read_cr2();
577                 /* Similarly, if we took a trap because the Guest used the FPU,
578                  * we have to restore the FPU it expects to see. */
579                 else if (lg->regs->trapnum == 7)
580                         math_state_restore();
581
582                 /* Restore SYSENTER if it's supposed to be on. */
583                 if (boot_cpu_has(X86_FEATURE_SEP))
584                         wrmsr(MSR_IA32_SYSENTER_CS, __KERNEL_CS, 0);
585
586                 /* Now we're ready to be interrupted or moved to other CPUs */
587                 local_irq_enable();
588
589                 /* OK, so what happened? */
590                 switch (lg->regs->trapnum) {
591                 case 13: /* We've intercepted a GPF. */
592                         /* Check if this was one of those annoying IN or OUT
593                          * instructions which we need to emulate.  If so, we
594                          * just go back into the Guest after we've done it. */
595                         if (lg->regs->errcode == 0) {
596                                 if (emulate_insn(lg))
597                                         continue;
598                         }
599                         break;
600                 case 14: /* We've intercepted a page fault. */
601                         /* The Guest accessed a virtual address that wasn't
602                          * mapped.  This happens a lot: we don't actually set
603                          * up most of the page tables for the Guest at all when
604                          * we start: as it runs it asks for more and more, and
605                          * we set them up as required. In this case, we don't
606                          * even tell the Guest that the fault happened.
607                          *
608                          * The errcode tells whether this was a read or a
609                          * write, and whether kernel or userspace code. */
610                         if (demand_page(lg, cr2, lg->regs->errcode))
611                                 continue;
612
613                         /* OK, it's really not there (or not OK): the Guest
614                          * needs to know.  We write out the cr2 value so it
615                          * knows where the fault occurred.
616                          *
617                          * Note that if the Guest were really messed up, this
618                          * could happen before it's done the INITIALIZE
619                          * hypercall, so lg->lguest_data will be NULL */
620                         if (lg->lguest_data
621                             && put_user(cr2, &lg->lguest_data->cr2))
622                                 kill_guest(lg, "Writing cr2");
623                         break;
624                 case 7: /* We've intercepted a Device Not Available fault. */
625                         /* If the Guest doesn't want to know, we already
626                          * restored the Floating Point Unit, so we just
627                          * continue without telling it. */
628                         if (!lg->ts)
629                                 continue;
630                         break;
631                 case 32 ... 255:
632                         /* These values mean a real interrupt occurred, in
633                          * which case the Host handler has already been run.
634                          * We just do a friendly check if another process
635                          * should now be run, then fall through to loop
636                          * around: */
637                         cond_resched();
638                 case LGUEST_TRAP_ENTRY: /* Handled at top of loop */
639                         continue;
640                 }
641
642                 /* If we get here, it's a trap the Guest wants to know
643                  * about. */
644                 if (deliver_trap(lg, lg->regs->trapnum))
645                         continue;
646
647                 /* If the Guest doesn't have a handler (either it hasn't
648                  * registered any yet, or it's one of the faults we don't let
649                  * it handle), it dies with a cryptic error message. */
650                 kill_guest(lg, "unhandled trap %li at %#lx (%#lx)",
651                            lg->regs->trapnum, lg->regs->eip,
652                            lg->regs->trapnum == 14 ? cr2 : lg->regs->errcode);
653         }
654         /* The Guest is dead => "No such file or directory" */
655         return -ENOENT;
656 }
657
658 /* Now we can look at each of the routines this calls, in increasing order of
659  * complexity: do_hypercalls(), emulate_insn(), maybe_do_interrupt(),
660  * deliver_trap() and demand_page().  After all those, we'll be ready to
661  * examine the Switcher, and our philosophical understanding of the Host/Guest
662  * duality will be complete. :*/
663
664 int find_free_guest(void)
665 {
666         unsigned int i;
667         for (i = 0; i < MAX_LGUEST_GUESTS; i++)
668                 if (!lguests[i].tsk)
669                         return i;
670         return -1;
671 }
672
673 static void adjust_pge(void *on)
674 {
675         if (on)
676                 write_cr4(read_cr4() | X86_CR4_PGE);
677         else
678                 write_cr4(read_cr4() & ~X86_CR4_PGE);
679 }
680
681 /*H:000
682  * Welcome to the Host!
683  *
684  * By this point your brain has been tickled by the Guest code and numbed by
685  * the Launcher code; prepare for it to be stretched by the Host code.  This is
686  * the heart.  Let's begin at the initialization routine for the Host's lg
687  * module.
688  */
689 static int __init init(void)
690 {
691         int err;
692
693         /* Lguest can't run under Xen, VMI or itself.  It does Tricky Stuff. */
694         if (paravirt_enabled()) {
695                 printk("lguest is afraid of %s\n", pv_info.name);
696                 return -EPERM;
697         }
698
699         /* First we put the Switcher up in very high virtual memory. */
700         err = map_switcher();
701         if (err)
702                 return err;
703
704         /* Now we set up the pagetable implementation for the Guests. */
705         err = init_pagetables(switcher_page, SHARED_SWITCHER_PAGES);
706         if (err) {
707                 unmap_switcher();
708                 return err;
709         }
710
711         /* The I/O subsystem needs some things initialized. */
712         lguest_io_init();
713
714         /* /dev/lguest needs to be registered. */
715         err = lguest_device_init();
716         if (err) {
717                 free_pagetables();
718                 unmap_switcher();
719                 return err;
720         }
721
722         /* Finally, we need to turn off "Page Global Enable".  PGE is an
723          * optimization where page table entries are specially marked to show
724          * they never change.  The Host kernel marks all the kernel pages this
725          * way because it's always present, even when userspace is running.
726          *
727          * Lguest breaks this: unbeknownst to the rest of the Host kernel, we
728          * switch to the Guest kernel.  If you don't disable this on all CPUs,
729          * you'll get really weird bugs that you'll chase for two days.
730          *
731          * I used to turn PGE off every time we switched to the Guest and back
732          * on when we return, but that slowed the Switcher down noticibly. */
733
734         /* We don't need the complexity of CPUs coming and going while we're
735          * doing this. */
736         lock_cpu_hotplug();
737         if (cpu_has_pge) { /* We have a broader idea of "global". */
738                 /* Remember that this was originally set (for cleanup). */
739                 cpu_had_pge = 1;
740                 /* adjust_pge is a helper function which sets or unsets the PGE
741                  * bit on its CPU, depending on the argument (0 == unset). */
742                 on_each_cpu(adjust_pge, (void *)0, 0, 1);
743                 /* Turn off the feature in the global feature set. */
744                 clear_bit(X86_FEATURE_PGE, boot_cpu_data.x86_capability);
745         }
746         unlock_cpu_hotplug();
747
748         /* All good! */
749         return 0;
750 }
751
752 /* Cleaning up is just the same code, backwards.  With a little French. */
753 static void __exit fini(void)
754 {
755         lguest_device_remove();
756         free_pagetables();
757         unmap_switcher();
758
759         /* If we had PGE before we started, turn it back on now. */
760         lock_cpu_hotplug();
761         if (cpu_had_pge) {
762                 set_bit(X86_FEATURE_PGE, boot_cpu_data.x86_capability);
763                 /* adjust_pge's argument "1" means set PGE. */
764                 on_each_cpu(adjust_pge, (void *)1, 0, 1);
765         }
766         unlock_cpu_hotplug();
767 }
768
769 /* The Host side of lguest can be a module.  This is a nice way for people to
770  * play with it.  */
771 module_init(init);
772 module_exit(fini);
773 MODULE_LICENSE("GPL");
774 MODULE_AUTHOR("Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au>");