doc: cpuset: Update the cpuset flag file
GeunSik Lim [Wed, 24 Feb 2010 10:06:39 +0000 (11:06 +0100)]
This patch is for modifying with correct cuset flag file.  We need to update
current manual for cpuset.  For example, before) cpus, cpu_exclusive, mems
after ) cpuset.cpus, cpuset.cpu_exclusive, cpuset.mems

Signed-off-by: Geunsik Lim <geunsik.lim@samsung.com>
Acked-by: Paul Menage <menage@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Jiri Kosina <jkosina@suse.cz>

Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt

index 1d7e978..4160df8 100644 (file)
@@ -168,20 +168,20 @@ Each cpuset is represented by a directory in the cgroup file system
 containing (on top of the standard cgroup files) the following
 files describing that cpuset:
 
- - cpus: list of CPUs in that cpuset
- - mems: list of Memory Nodes in that cpuset
- - memory_migrate flag: if set, move pages to cpusets nodes
- - cpu_exclusive flag: is cpu placement exclusive?
- - mem_exclusive flag: is memory placement exclusive?
- - mem_hardwall flag:  is memory allocation hardwalled
- - memory_pressure: measure of how much paging pressure in cpuset
- - memory_spread_page flag: if set, spread page cache evenly on allowed nodes
- - memory_spread_slab flag: if set, spread slab cache evenly on allowed nodes
- - sched_load_balance flag: if set, load balance within CPUs on that cpuset
- - sched_relax_domain_level: the searching range when migrating tasks
+ - cpuset.cpus: list of CPUs in that cpuset
+ - cpuset.mems: list of Memory Nodes in that cpuset
+ - cpuset.memory_migrate flag: if set, move pages to cpusets nodes
+ - cpuset.cpu_exclusive flag: is cpu placement exclusive?
+ - cpuset.mem_exclusive flag: is memory placement exclusive?
+ - cpuset.mem_hardwall flag:  is memory allocation hardwalled
+ - cpuset.memory_pressure: measure of how much paging pressure in cpuset
+ - cpuset.memory_spread_page flag: if set, spread page cache evenly on allowed nodes
+ - cpuset.memory_spread_slab flag: if set, spread slab cache evenly on allowed nodes
+ - cpuset.sched_load_balance flag: if set, load balance within CPUs on that cpuset
+ - cpuset.sched_relax_domain_level: the searching range when migrating tasks
 
 In addition, the root cpuset only has the following file:
- - memory_pressure_enabled flag: compute memory_pressure?
+ - cpuset.memory_pressure_enabled flag: compute memory_pressure?
 
 New cpusets are created using the mkdir system call or shell
 command.  The properties of a cpuset, such as its flags, allowed
@@ -229,7 +229,7 @@ If a cpuset is cpu or mem exclusive, no other cpuset, other than
 a direct ancestor or descendant, may share any of the same CPUs or
 Memory Nodes.
 
-A cpuset that is mem_exclusive *or* mem_hardwall is "hardwalled",
+A cpuset that is cpuset.mem_exclusive *or* cpuset.mem_hardwall is "hardwalled",
 i.e. it restricts kernel allocations for page, buffer and other data
 commonly shared by the kernel across multiple users.  All cpusets,
 whether hardwalled or not, restrict allocations of memory for user
@@ -304,15 +304,15 @@ times 1000.
 ---------------------------
 There are two boolean flag files per cpuset that control where the
 kernel allocates pages for the file system buffers and related in
-kernel data structures.  They are called 'memory_spread_page' and
-'memory_spread_slab'.
+kernel data structures.  They are called 'cpuset.memory_spread_page' and
+'cpuset.memory_spread_slab'.
 
-If the per-cpuset boolean flag file 'memory_spread_page' is set, then
+If the per-cpuset boolean flag file 'cpuset.memory_spread_page' is set, then
 the kernel will spread the file system buffers (page cache) evenly
 over all the nodes that the faulting task is allowed to use, instead
 of preferring to put those pages on the node where the task is running.
 
-If the per-cpuset boolean flag file 'memory_spread_slab' is set,
+If the per-cpuset boolean flag file 'cpuset.memory_spread_slab' is set,
 then the kernel will spread some file system related slab caches,
 such as for inodes and dentries evenly over all the nodes that the
 faulting task is allowed to use, instead of preferring to put those
@@ -337,21 +337,21 @@ their containing tasks memory spread settings.  If memory spreading
 is turned off, then the currently specified NUMA mempolicy once again
 applies to memory page allocations.
 
-Both 'memory_spread_page' and 'memory_spread_slab' are boolean flag
+Both 'cpuset.memory_spread_page' and 'cpuset.memory_spread_slab' are boolean flag
 files.  By default they contain "0", meaning that the feature is off
 for that cpuset.  If a "1" is written to that file, then that turns
 the named feature on.
 
 The implementation is simple.
 
-Setting the flag 'memory_spread_page' turns on a per-process flag
+Setting the flag 'cpuset.memory_spread_page' turns on a per-process flag
 PF_SPREAD_PAGE for each task that is in that cpuset or subsequently
 joins that cpuset.  The page allocation calls for the page cache
 is modified to perform an inline check for this PF_SPREAD_PAGE task
 flag, and if set, a call to a new routine cpuset_mem_spread_node()
 returns the node to prefer for the allocation.
 
-Similarly, setting 'memory_spread_slab' turns on the flag
+Similarly, setting 'cpuset.memory_spread_slab' turns on the flag
 PF_SPREAD_SLAB, and appropriately marked slab caches will allocate
 pages from the node returned by cpuset_mem_spread_node().
 
@@ -404,24 +404,24 @@ the following two situations:
     system overhead on those CPUs, including avoiding task load
     balancing if that is not needed.
 
-When the per-cpuset flag "sched_load_balance" is enabled (the default
-setting), it requests that all the CPUs in that cpusets allowed 'cpus'
+When the per-cpuset flag "cpuset.sched_load_balance" is enabled (the default
+setting), it requests that all the CPUs in that cpusets allowed 'cpuset.cpus'
 be contained in a single sched domain, ensuring that load balancing
 can move a task (not otherwised pinned, as by sched_setaffinity)
 from any CPU in that cpuset to any other.
 
-When the per-cpuset flag "sched_load_balance" is disabled, then the
+When the per-cpuset flag "cpuset.sched_load_balance" is disabled, then the
 scheduler will avoid load balancing across the CPUs in that cpuset,
 --except-- in so far as is necessary because some overlapping cpuset
 has "sched_load_balance" enabled.
 
-So, for example, if the top cpuset has the flag "sched_load_balance"
+So, for example, if the top cpuset has the flag "cpuset.sched_load_balance"
 enabled, then the scheduler will have one sched domain covering all
-CPUs, and the setting of the "sched_load_balance" flag in any other
+CPUs, and the setting of the "cpuset.sched_load_balance" flag in any other
 cpusets won't matter, as we're already fully load balancing.
 
 Therefore in the above two situations, the top cpuset flag
-"sched_load_balance" should be disabled, and only some of the smaller,
+"cpuset.sched_load_balance" should be disabled, and only some of the smaller,
 child cpusets have this flag enabled.
 
 When doing this, you don't usually want to leave any unpinned tasks in
@@ -433,7 +433,7 @@ scheduler might not consider the possibility of load balancing that
 task to that underused CPU.
 
 Of course, tasks pinned to a particular CPU can be left in a cpuset
-that disables "sched_load_balance" as those tasks aren't going anywhere
+that disables "cpuset.sched_load_balance" as those tasks aren't going anywhere
 else anyway.
 
 There is an impedance mismatch here, between cpusets and sched domains.
@@ -443,19 +443,19 @@ overlap and each CPU is in at most one sched domain.
 It is necessary for sched domains to be flat because load balancing
 across partially overlapping sets of CPUs would risk unstable dynamics
 that would be beyond our understanding.  So if each of two partially
-overlapping cpusets enables the flag 'sched_load_balance', then we
+overlapping cpusets enables the flag 'cpuset.sched_load_balance', then we
 form a single sched domain that is a superset of both.  We won't move
 a task to a CPU outside it cpuset, but the scheduler load balancing
 code might waste some compute cycles considering that possibility.
 
 This mismatch is why there is not a simple one-to-one relation
-between which cpusets have the flag "sched_load_balance" enabled,
+between which cpusets have the flag "cpuset.sched_load_balance" enabled,
 and the sched domain configuration.  If a cpuset enables the flag, it
 will get balancing across all its CPUs, but if it disables the flag,
 it will only be assured of no load balancing if no other overlapping
 cpuset enables the flag.
 
-If two cpusets have partially overlapping 'cpus' allowed, and only
+If two cpusets have partially overlapping 'cpuset.cpus' allowed, and only
 one of them has this flag enabled, then the other may find its
 tasks only partially load balanced, just on the overlapping CPUs.
 This is just the general case of the top_cpuset example given a few
@@ -468,23 +468,23 @@ load balancing to the other CPUs.
 1.7.1 sched_load_balance implementation details.
 ------------------------------------------------
 
-The per-cpuset flag 'sched_load_balance' defaults to enabled (contrary
+The per-cpuset flag 'cpuset.sched_load_balance' defaults to enabled (contrary
 to most cpuset flags.)  When enabled for a cpuset, the kernel will
 ensure that it can load balance across all the CPUs in that cpuset
 (makes sure that all the CPUs in the cpus_allowed of that cpuset are
 in the same sched domain.)
 
-If two overlapping cpusets both have 'sched_load_balance' enabled,
+If two overlapping cpusets both have 'cpuset.sched_load_balance' enabled,
 then they will be (must be) both in the same sched domain.
 
-If, as is the default, the top cpuset has 'sched_load_balance' enabled,
+If, as is the default, the top cpuset has 'cpuset.sched_load_balance' enabled,
 then by the above that means there is a single sched domain covering
 the whole system, regardless of any other cpuset settings.
 
 The kernel commits to user space that it will avoid load balancing
 where it can.  It will pick as fine a granularity partition of sched
 domains as it can while still providing load balancing for any set
-of CPUs allowed to a cpuset having 'sched_load_balance' enabled.
+of CPUs allowed to a cpuset having 'cpuset.sched_load_balance' enabled.
 
 The internal kernel cpuset to scheduler interface passes from the
 cpuset code to the scheduler code a partition of the load balanced
@@ -495,9 +495,9 @@ all the CPUs that must be load balanced.
 The cpuset code builds a new such partition and passes it to the
 scheduler sched domain setup code, to have the sched domains rebuilt
 as necessary, whenever:
- - the 'sched_load_balance' flag of a cpuset with non-empty CPUs changes,
+ - the 'cpuset.sched_load_balance' flag of a cpuset with non-empty CPUs changes,
  - or CPUs come or go from a cpuset with this flag enabled,
- - or 'sched_relax_domain_level' value of a cpuset with non-empty CPUs
+ - or 'cpuset.sched_relax_domain_level' value of a cpuset with non-empty CPUs
    and with this flag enabled changes,
  - or a cpuset with non-empty CPUs and with this flag enabled is removed,
  - or a cpu is offlined/onlined.
@@ -542,7 +542,7 @@ As the result, task B on CPU X need to wait task A or wait load balance
 on the next tick.  For some applications in special situation, waiting
 1 tick may be too long.
 
-The 'sched_relax_domain_level' file allows you to request changing
+The 'cpuset.sched_relax_domain_level' file allows you to request changing
 this searching range as you like.  This file takes int value which
 indicates size of searching range in levels ideally as follows,
 otherwise initial value -1 that indicates the cpuset has no request.
@@ -559,8 +559,8 @@ The system default is architecture dependent.  The system default
 can be changed using the relax_domain_level= boot parameter.
 
 This file is per-cpuset and affect the sched domain where the cpuset
-belongs to.  Therefore if the flag 'sched_load_balance' of a cpuset
-is disabled, then 'sched_relax_domain_level' have no effect since
+belongs to.  Therefore if the flag 'cpuset.sched_load_balance' of a cpuset
+is disabled, then 'cpuset.sched_relax_domain_level' have no effect since
 there is no sched domain belonging the cpuset.
 
 If multiple cpusets are overlapping and hence they form a single sched
@@ -607,9 +607,9 @@ from one cpuset to another, then the kernel will adjust the tasks
 memory placement, as above, the next time that the kernel attempts
 to allocate a page of memory for that task.
 
-If a cpuset has its 'cpus' modified, then each task in that cpuset
+If a cpuset has its 'cpuset.cpus' modified, then each task in that cpuset
 will have its allowed CPU placement changed immediately.  Similarly,
-if a tasks pid is written to another cpusets 'tasks' file, then its
+if a tasks pid is written to another cpusets 'cpuset.tasks' file, then its
 allowed CPU placement is changed immediately.  If such a task had been
 bound to some subset of its cpuset using the sched_setaffinity() call,
 the task will be allowed to run on any CPU allowed in its new cpuset,
@@ -622,8 +622,8 @@ and the processor placement is updated immediately.
 Normally, once a page is allocated (given a physical page
 of main memory) then that page stays on whatever node it
 was allocated, so long as it remains allocated, even if the
-cpusets memory placement policy 'mems' subsequently changes.
-If the cpuset flag file 'memory_migrate' is set true, then when
+cpusets memory placement policy 'cpuset.mems' subsequently changes.
+If the cpuset flag file 'cpuset.memory_migrate' is set true, then when
 tasks are attached to that cpuset, any pages that task had
 allocated to it on nodes in its previous cpuset are migrated
 to the tasks new cpuset. The relative placement of the page within
@@ -631,12 +631,12 @@ the cpuset is preserved during these migration operations if possible.
 For example if the page was on the second valid node of the prior cpuset
 then the page will be placed on the second valid node of the new cpuset.
 
-Also if 'memory_migrate' is set true, then if that cpusets
-'mems' file is modified, pages allocated to tasks in that
-cpuset, that were on nodes in the previous setting of 'mems',
+Also if 'cpuset.memory_migrate' is set true, then if that cpusets
+'cpuset.mems' file is modified, pages allocated to tasks in that
+cpuset, that were on nodes in the previous setting of 'cpuset.mems',
 will be moved to nodes in the new setting of 'mems.'
 Pages that were not in the tasks prior cpuset, or in the cpusets
-prior 'mems' setting, will not be moved.
+prior 'cpuset.mems' setting, will not be moved.
 
 There is an exception to the above.  If hotplug functionality is used
 to remove all the CPUs that are currently assigned to a cpuset,
@@ -678,8 +678,8 @@ and then start a subshell 'sh' in that cpuset:
   cd /dev/cpuset
   mkdir Charlie
   cd Charlie
-  /bin/echo 2-3 > cpus
-  /bin/echo 1 > mems
+  /bin/echo 2-3 > cpuset.cpus
+  /bin/echo 1 > cpuset.mems
   /bin/echo $$ > tasks
   sh
   # The subshell 'sh' is now running in cpuset Charlie
@@ -725,10 +725,13 @@ Now you want to do something with this cpuset.
 
 In this directory you can find several files:
 # ls
-cpu_exclusive  memory_migrate      mems                      tasks
-cpus           memory_pressure     notify_on_release
-mem_exclusive  memory_spread_page  sched_load_balance
-mem_hardwall   memory_spread_slab  sched_relax_domain_level
+cpuset.cpu_exclusive       cpuset.memory_spread_slab
+cpuset.cpus                cpuset.mems
+cpuset.mem_exclusive       cpuset.sched_load_balance
+cpuset.mem_hardwall        cpuset.sched_relax_domain_level
+cpuset.memory_migrate      notify_on_release
+cpuset.memory_pressure     tasks
+cpuset.memory_spread_page
 
 Reading them will give you information about the state of this cpuset:
 the CPUs and Memory Nodes it can use, the processes that are using
@@ -736,13 +739,13 @@ it, its properties.  By writing to these files you can manipulate
 the cpuset.
 
 Set some flags:
-# /bin/echo 1 > cpu_exclusive
+# /bin/echo 1 > cpuset.cpu_exclusive
 
 Add some cpus:
-# /bin/echo 0-7 > cpus
+# /bin/echo 0-7 > cpuset.cpus
 
 Add some mems:
-# /bin/echo 0-7 > mems
+# /bin/echo 0-7 > cpuset.mems
 
 Now attach your shell to this cpuset:
 # /bin/echo $$ > tasks
@@ -774,28 +777,28 @@ echo "/sbin/cpuset_release_agent" > /dev/cpuset/release_agent
 This is the syntax to use when writing in the cpus or mems files
 in cpuset directories:
 
-# /bin/echo 1-4 > cpus         -> set cpus list to cpus 1,2,3,4
-# /bin/echo 1,2,3,4 > cpus     -> set cpus list to cpus 1,2,3,4
+# /bin/echo 1-4 > cpuset.cpus          -> set cpus list to cpus 1,2,3,4
+# /bin/echo 1,2,3,4 > cpuset.cpus      -> set cpus list to cpus 1,2,3,4
 
 To add a CPU to a cpuset, write the new list of CPUs including the
 CPU to be added. To add 6 to the above cpuset:
 
-# /bin/echo 1-4,6 > cpus       -> set cpus list to cpus 1,2,3,4,6
+# /bin/echo 1-4,6 > cpuset.cpus        -> set cpus list to cpus 1,2,3,4,6
 
 Similarly to remove a CPU from a cpuset, write the new list of CPUs
 without the CPU to be removed.
 
 To remove all the CPUs:
 
-# /bin/echo "" > cpus          -> clear cpus list
+# /bin/echo "" > cpuset.cpus           -> clear cpus list
 
 2.3 Setting flags
 -----------------
 
 The syntax is very simple:
 
-# /bin/echo 1 > cpu_exclusive  -> set flag 'cpu_exclusive'
-# /bin/echo 0 > cpu_exclusive  -> unset flag 'cpu_exclusive'
+# /bin/echo 1 > cpuset.cpu_exclusive   -> set flag 'cpuset.cpu_exclusive'
+# /bin/echo 0 > cpuset.cpu_exclusive   -> unset flag 'cpuset.cpu_exclusive'
 
 2.4 Attaching processes
 -----------------------