Remove mention of semaphores from kernel-locking
Matthew Wilcox [Wed, 23 Apr 2008 11:20:41 +0000 (07:20 -0400)]
Since the consensus seems to be to eliminate semaphores where possible,
we shouldn't be educating people about how to use them as locks.  Use
mutexes instead.  Semaphores should be described in a separate document
if we end up keeping them.

Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au>

Documentation/DocBook/kernel-locking.tmpl

index 2510763..084f6ad 100644 (file)
    </para>
 
    <sect1 id="lock-intro">
-   <title>Three Main Types of Kernel Locks: Spinlocks, Mutexes and Semaphores</title>
+   <title>Two Main Types of Kernel Locks: Spinlocks and Mutexes</title>
 
    <para>
-     There are three main types of kernel locks.  The fundamental type
+     There are two main types of kernel locks.  The fundamental type
      is the spinlock 
      (<filename class="headerfile">include/asm/spinlock.h</filename>),
      which is a very simple single-holder lock: if you can't get the 
      use a spinlock instead.
    </para>
    <para>
-     The third type is a semaphore
-     (<filename class="headerfile">include/linux/semaphore.h</filename>): it
-     can have more than one holder at any time (the number decided at
-     initialization time), although it is most commonly used as a
-     single-holder lock (a mutex).  If you can't get a semaphore, your
-     task will be suspended and later on woken up - just like for mutexes.
-   </para>
-   <para>
      Neither type of lock is recursive: see
      <xref linkend="deadlock"/>.
    </para>
     </para>
 
     <para>
-      Semaphores still exist, because they are required for
+      Mutexes still exist, because they are required for
       synchronization between <firstterm linkend="gloss-usercontext">user 
       contexts</firstterm>, as we will see below.
     </para>
 
      <para>
        If you have a data structure which is only ever accessed from
-       user context, then you can use a simple semaphore
-       (<filename>linux/linux/semaphore.h</filename>) to protect it.  This
-       is the most trivial case: you initialize the semaphore to the number 
-       of resources available (usually 1), and call
-       <function>down_interruptible()</function> to grab the semaphore, and 
-       <function>up()</function> to release it.  There is also a 
-       <function>down()</function>, which should be avoided, because it 
+       user context, then you can use a simple mutex
+       (<filename>include/linux/mutex.h</filename>) to protect it.  This
+       is the most trivial case: you initialize the mutex.  Then you can
+       call <function>mutex_lock_interruptible()</function> to grab the mutex,
+       and <function>mutex_unlock()</function> to release it.  There is also a 
+       <function>mutex_lock()</function>, which should be avoided, because it 
        will not return if a signal is received.
      </para>
 
      <para>
-       Example: <filename>linux/net/core/netfilter.c</filename> allows 
+       Example: <filename>net/netfilter/nf_sockopt.c</filename> allows 
        registration of new <function>setsockopt()</function> and 
        <function>getsockopt()</function> calls, with
        <function>nf_register_sockopt()</function>.  Registration and 
       <listitem>
        <para>
           If you are in a process context (any syscall) and want to
-       lock other process out, use a semaphore.  You can take a semaphore
+       lock other process out, use a mutex.  You can take a mutex
        and sleep (<function>copy_from_user*(</function> or
        <function>kmalloc(x,GFP_KERNEL)</function>).
       </para>
 <entry>SLBH</entry>
 <entry>SLBH</entry>
 <entry>SLBH</entry>
-<entry>DI</entry>
+<entry>MLI</entry>
 <entry>None</entry>
 </row>
 
 <entry>spin_lock_bh</entry>
 </row>
 <row>
-<entry>DI</entry>
-<entry>down_interruptible</entry>
+<entry>MLI</entry>
+<entry>mutex_lock_interruptible</entry>
 </row>
 
 </tbody>
@@ -1310,7 +1301,7 @@ as Alan Cox says, <quote>Lock data, not code</quote>.
     <para>
       There is a coding bug where a piece of code tries to grab a
       spinlock twice: it will spin forever, waiting for the lock to
-      be released (spinlocks, rwlocks and semaphores are not
+      be released (spinlocks, rwlocks and mutexes are not
       recursive in Linux).  This is trivial to diagnose: not a
       stay-up-five-nights-talk-to-fluffy-code-bunnies kind of
       problem.
@@ -1335,7 +1326,7 @@ as Alan Cox says, <quote>Lock data, not code</quote>.
 
     <para>
       This complete lockup is easy to diagnose: on SMP boxes the
-      watchdog timer or compiling with <symbol>DEBUG_SPINLOCKS</symbol> set
+      watchdog timer or compiling with <symbol>DEBUG_SPINLOCK</symbol> set
       (<filename>include/linux/spinlock.h</filename>) will show this up 
       immediately when it happens.
     </para>
@@ -1558,7 +1549,7 @@ the amount of locking which needs to be done.
    <title>Read/Write Lock Variants</title>
 
    <para>
-      Both spinlocks and semaphores have read/write variants:
+      Both spinlocks and mutexes have read/write variants:
       <type>rwlock_t</type> and <structname>struct rw_semaphore</structname>.
       These divide users into two classes: the readers and the writers.  If
       you are only reading the data, you can get a read lock, but to write to
@@ -1681,7 +1672,7 @@ the amount of locking which needs to be done.
  #include &lt;linux/slab.h&gt;
  #include &lt;linux/string.h&gt;
 +#include &lt;linux/rcupdate.h&gt;
- #include &lt;linux/semaphore.h&gt;
+ #include &lt;linux/mutex.h&gt;
  #include &lt;asm/errno.h&gt;
 
  struct object
@@ -1913,7 +1904,7 @@ machines due to caching.
        </listitem>
        <listitem>
         <para>
-          <function> put_user()</function>
+          <function>put_user()</function>
         </para>
        </listitem>
       </itemizedlist>
@@ -1927,13 +1918,13 @@ machines due to caching.
 
      <listitem>
       <para>
-      <function>down_interruptible()</function> and
-      <function>down()</function>
+      <function>mutex_lock_interruptible()</function> and
+      <function>mutex_lock()</function>
       </para>
       <para>
-       There is a <function>down_trylock()</function> which can be
+       There is a <function>mutex_trylock()</function> which can be
        used inside interrupt context, as it will not sleep.
-       <function>up()</function> will also never sleep.
+       <function>mutex_unlock()</function> will also never sleep.
       </para>
      </listitem>
     </itemizedlist>
@@ -2023,7 +2014,7 @@ machines due to caching.
       <para>
         Prior to 2.5, or when <symbol>CONFIG_PREEMPT</symbol> is
         unset, processes in user context inside the kernel would not
-        preempt each other (ie. you had that CPU until you have it up,
+        preempt each other (ie. you had that CPU until you gave it up,
         except for interrupts).  With the addition of
         <symbol>CONFIG_PREEMPT</symbol> in 2.5.4, this changed: when
         in user context, higher priority tasks can "cut in": spinlocks