Documentation/Changes: remove some really obsolete text
Linus Torvalds [Mon, 11 Jul 2011 23:48:38 +0000 (16:48 -0700)]
That file harkens back to the days of the big 2.4 -> 2.6 version jump,
and was based even then on older versions.  Some of it is just obsolete,
and Jesper Juhl points out that it talks about kernel versions 2.6 and
should be updated to 3.0.

Remove some obsolete text, and re-phrase some other to not be 2.6-specific.

Reported-by: Jesper Juhl <jj@chaosbits.net>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Documentation/Changes

index 5f4828a..b175808 100644 (file)
@@ -2,13 +2,7 @@ Intro
 =====
 
 This document is designed to provide a list of the minimum levels of
-software necessary to run the 2.6 kernels, as well as provide brief
-instructions regarding any other "Gotchas" users may encounter when
-trying life on the Bleeding Edge.  If upgrading from a pre-2.4.x
-kernel, please consult the Changes file included with 2.4.x kernels for
-additional information; most of that information will not be repeated
-here.  Basically, this document assumes that your system is already
-functional and running at least 2.4.x kernels.
+software necessary to run the 3.0 kernels.
 
 This document is originally based on my "Changes" file for 2.0.x kernels
 and therefore owes credit to the same people as that file (Jared Mauch,
@@ -22,11 +16,10 @@ Upgrade to at *least* these software revisions before thinking you've
 encountered a bug!  If you're unsure what version you're currently
 running, the suggested command should tell you.
 
-Again, keep in mind that this list assumes you are already
-functionally running a Linux 2.4 kernel.  Also, not all tools are
-necessary on all systems; obviously, if you don't have any ISDN
-hardware, for example, you probably needn't concern yourself with
-isdn4k-utils.
+Again, keep in mind that this list assumes you are already functionally
+running a Linux kernel.  Also, not all tools are necessary on all
+systems; obviously, if you don't have any ISDN hardware, for example,
+you probably needn't concern yourself with isdn4k-utils.
 
 o  Gnu C                  3.2                     # gcc --version
 o  Gnu make               3.80                    # make --version
@@ -114,12 +107,12 @@ Ksymoops
 
 If the unthinkable happens and your kernel oopses, you may need the
 ksymoops tool to decode it, but in most cases you don't.
-In the 2.6 kernel it is generally preferred to build the kernel with
-CONFIG_KALLSYMS so that it produces readable dumps that can be used as-is
-(this also produces better output than ksymoops).
-If for some reason your kernel is not build with CONFIG_KALLSYMS and
-you have no way to rebuild and reproduce the Oops with that option, then
-you can still decode that Oops with ksymoops.
+It is generally preferred to build the kernel with CONFIG_KALLSYMS so
+that it produces readable dumps that can be used as-is (this also
+produces better output than ksymoops).  If for some reason your kernel
+is not build with CONFIG_KALLSYMS and you have no way to rebuild and
+reproduce the Oops with that option, then you can still decode that Oops
+with ksymoops.
 
 Module-Init-Tools
 -----------------
@@ -261,8 +254,8 @@ needs to be recompiled or (preferably) upgraded.
 NFS-utils
 ---------
 
-In 2.4 and earlier kernels, the nfs server needed to know about any
-client that expected to be able to access files via NFS.  This
+In ancient (2.4 and earlier) kernels, the nfs server needed to know
+about any client that expected to be able to access files via NFS.  This
 information would be given to the kernel by "mountd" when the client
 mounted the filesystem, or by "exportfs" at system startup.  exportfs
 would take information about active clients from /var/lib/nfs/rmtab.
@@ -272,11 +265,11 @@ which is not always easy, particularly when trying to implement
 fail-over.  Even when the system is working well, rmtab suffers from
 getting lots of old entries that never get removed.
 
-With 2.6 we have the option of having the kernel tell mountd when it
-gets a request from an unknown host, and mountd can give appropriate
-export information to the kernel.  This removes the dependency on
-rmtab and means that the kernel only needs to know about currently
-active clients.
+With modern kernels we have the option of having the kernel tell mountd
+when it gets a request from an unknown host, and mountd can give
+appropriate export information to the kernel.  This removes the
+dependency on rmtab and means that the kernel only needs to know about
+currently active clients.
 
 To enable this new functionality, you need to: