Merge remote-tracking branch 'origin/android-tegra-nv-3.1' into android-t114-3.4
Varun Wadekar [Mon, 30 Jul 2012 12:52:08 +0000 (17:52 +0530)]
NULL merge from android-tegra-nv-3.1

Change-Id: I8c49e4b9df6820eb1ad7edca2233982a6c4043d8
Signed-off-by: Varun Wadekar <vwadekar@nvidia.com>

1  2 
Documentation/HOWTO

diff --combined Documentation/HOWTO
@@@ -11,7 -11,7 +11,6 @@@ If anything in this document becomes ou
  to the maintainer of this file, who is listed at the bottom of the
  document.
  
--
  Introduction
  ------------
  
@@@ -52,7 -52,7 +51,6 @@@ possible about these standards ahead o
  documented; do not expect people to adapt to you or your company's way
  of doing things.
  
--
  Legal Issues
  ------------
  
@@@ -66,7 -66,7 +64,6 @@@ their statements on legal matters
  For common questions and answers about the GPL, please see:
        http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html
  
--
  Documentation
  ------------
  
@@@ -187,7 -187,7 +184,7 @@@ apply a patch
  If you do not know where you want to start, but you want to look for
  some task to start doing to join into the kernel development community,
  go to the Linux Kernel Janitor's project:
--      http://kernelnewbies.org/KernelJanitors 
++      http://kernelnewbies.org/KernelJanitors
  It is a great place to start.  It describes a list of relatively simple
  problems that need to be cleaned up and fixed within the Linux kernel
  source tree.  Working with the developers in charge of this project, you
@@@ -218,16 -218,16 +215,16 @@@ The development proces
  Linux kernel development process currently consists of a few different
  main kernel "branches" and lots of different subsystem-specific kernel
  branches.  These different branches are:
 -  - main 2.6.x kernel tree
 -  - 2.6.x.y -stable kernel tree
 -  - 2.6.x -git kernel patches
 +  - main 3.x kernel tree
 +  - 3.x.y -stable kernel tree
 +  - 3.x -git kernel patches
    - subsystem specific kernel trees and patches
 -  - the 2.6.x -next kernel tree for integration tests
 +  - the 3.x -next kernel tree for integration tests
  
 -2.6.x kernel tree
 +3.x kernel tree
  -----------------
 -2.6.x kernels are maintained by Linus Torvalds, and can be found on
 -kernel.org in the pub/linux/kernel/v2.6/ directory.  Its development
 +3.x kernels are maintained by Linus Torvalds, and can be found on
 +kernel.org in the pub/linux/kernel/v3.x/ directory.  Its development
  process is as follows:
    - As soon as a new kernel is released a two weeks window is open,
      during this period of time maintainers can submit big diffs to
      release a new -rc kernel every week.
    - Process continues until the kernel is considered "ready", the
      process should last around 6 weeks.
--  - Known regressions in each release are periodically posted to the 
--    linux-kernel mailing list.  The goal is to reduce the length of 
++  - Known regressions in each release are periodically posted to the
++    linux-kernel mailing list.  The goal is to reduce the length of
      that list to zero before declaring the kernel to be "ready," but, in
--    the real world, a small number of regressions often remain at 
++    the real world, a small number of regressions often remain at
      release time.
  
  It is worth mentioning what Andrew Morton wrote on the linux-kernel
@@@ -262,20 -262,20 +259,20 @@@ mailing list about kernel releases
        released according to perceived bug status, not according to a
        preconceived timeline."
  
 -2.6.x.y -stable kernel tree
 +3.x.y -stable kernel tree
  ---------------------------
 -Kernels with 4-part versions are -stable kernels. They contain
 +Kernels with 3-part versions are -stable kernels. They contain
  relatively small and critical fixes for security problems or significant
 -regressions discovered in a given 2.6.x kernel.
 +regressions discovered in a given 3.x kernel.
  
  This is the recommended branch for users who want the most recent stable
  kernel and are not interested in helping test development/experimental
  versions.
  
 -If no 2.6.x.y kernel is available, then the highest numbered 2.6.x
 +If no 3.x.y kernel is available, then the highest numbered 3.x
  kernel is the current stable kernel.
  
 -2.6.x.y are maintained by the "stable" team <stable@vger.kernel.org>, and
 +3.x.y are maintained by the "stable" team <stable@vger.kernel.org>, and
  are released as needs dictate.  The normal release period is approximately
  two weeks, but it can be longer if there are no pressing problems.  A
  security-related problem, instead, can cause a release to happen almost
@@@ -285,7 -285,7 +282,7 @@@ The file Documentation/stable_kernel_ru
  documents what kinds of changes are acceptable for the -stable tree, and
  how the release process works.
  
 -2.6.x -git patches
 +3.x -git patches
  ------------------
  These are daily snapshots of Linus' kernel tree which are managed in a
  git repository (hence the name.) These patches are usually released
@@@ -317,13 -317,13 +314,13 @@@ revisions to it, and maintainers can ma
  accepted, or rejected.  Most of these patchwork sites are listed at
  http://patchwork.kernel.org/.
  
 -2.6.x -next kernel tree for integration tests
 +3.x -next kernel tree for integration tests
  ---------------------------------------------
 -Before updates from subsystem trees are merged into the mainline 2.6.x
 +Before updates from subsystem trees are merged into the mainline 3.x
  tree, they need to be integration-tested.  For this purpose, a special
  testing repository exists into which virtually all subsystem trees are
  pulled on an almost daily basis:
 -      http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/sfr/linux-next.git
 +      http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/next/linux-next.git
        http://linux.f-seidel.de/linux-next/pmwiki/
  
  This way, the -next kernel gives a summary outlook onto what will be