x86-64, compat: Test %rax for the syscall number, not %eax
authorH. Peter Anvin <hpa@linux.intel.com>
Tue, 14 Sep 2010 19:42:41 +0000 (12:42 -0700)
committerH. Peter Anvin <hpa@linux.intel.com>
Tue, 14 Sep 2010 23:08:46 +0000 (16:08 -0700)
commit36d001c70d8a0144ac1d038f6876c484849a74de
tree98e061ce49af5ce48d6d67ffe5d3258563f4445d
parentc41d68a513c71e35a14f66d71782d27a79a81ea6
x86-64, compat: Test %rax for the syscall number, not %eax

On 64 bits, we always, by necessity, jump through the system call
table via %rax.  For 32-bit system calls, in theory the system call
number is stored in %eax, and the code was testing %eax for a valid
system call number.  At one point we loaded the stored value back from
the stack to enforce zero-extension, but that was removed in checkin
d4d67150165df8bf1cc05e532f6efca96f907cab.  An actual 32-bit process
will not be able to introduce a non-zero-extended number, but it can
happen via ptrace.

Instead of re-introducing the zero-extension, test what we are
actually going to use, i.e. %rax.  This only adds a handful of REX
prefixes to the code.

Reported-by: Ben Hawkes <hawkes@sota.gen.nz>
Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@linux.intel.com>
Cc: <stable@kernel.org>
Cc: Roland McGrath <roland@redhat.com>
Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
arch/x86/ia32/ia32entry.S