mm: increase RECLAIM_DISTANCE to 30
authorKOSAKI Motohiro <kosaki.motohiro@jp.fujitsu.com>
Wed, 15 Jun 2011 22:08:20 +0000 (15:08 -0700)
committerLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
Thu, 16 Jun 2011 03:03:59 +0000 (20:03 -0700)
commit32e45ff43eaf5c17f5a82c9ad358d515622c2562
treebe4984b6be4b3ffe259ef19efac7bb12f3b26c2a
parent17441227f6258fc379c6ebfe21c3eec43b6f0de3
mm: increase RECLAIM_DISTANCE to 30

Recently, Robert Mueller reported (http://lkml.org/lkml/2010/9/12/236)
that zone_reclaim_mode doesn't work properly on his new NUMA server (Dual
Xeon E5520 + Intel S5520UR MB).  He is using Cyrus IMAPd and it's built on
a very traditional single-process model.

  * a master process which reads config files and manages the other
    process
  * multiple imapd processes, one per connection
  * multiple pop3d processes, one per connection
  * multiple lmtpd processes, one per connection
  * periodical "cleanup" processes.

There are thousands of independent processes.  The problem is, recent
Intel motherboard turn on zone_reclaim_mode by default and traditional
prefork model software don't work well on it.  Unfortunatelly, such models
are still typical even in the 21st century.  We can't ignore them.

This patch raises the zone_reclaim_mode threshold to 30.  30 doesn't have
any specific meaning.  but 20 means that one-hop QPI/Hypertransport and
such relatively cheap 2-4 socket machine are often used for traditional
servers as above.  The intention is that these machines don't use
zone_reclaim_mode.

Note: ia64 and Power have arch specific RECLAIM_DISTANCE definitions.
This patch doesn't change such high-end NUMA machine behavior.

Dave Hansen said:

: I know specifically of pieces of x86 hardware that set the information
: in the BIOS to '21' *specifically* so they'll get the zone_reclaim_mode
: behavior which that implies.
:
: They've done performance testing and run very large and scary benchmarks
: to make sure that they _want_ this turned on.  What this means for them
: is that they'll probably be de-optimized, at least on newer versions of
: the kernel.
:
: If you want to do this for particular systems, maybe _that_'s what we
: should do.  Have a list of specific configurations that need the
: defaults overridden either because they're buggy, or they have an
: unusual hardware configuration not really reflected in the distance
: table.

And later said:

: The original change in the hardware tables was for the benefit of a
: benchmark.  Said benchmark isn't going to get run on mainline until the
: next batch of enterprise distros drops, at which point the hardware where
: this was done will be irrelevant for the benchmark.  I'm sure any new
: hardware will just set this distance to another yet arbitrary value to
: make the kernel do what it wants.  :)
:
: Also, when the hardware got _set_ to this initially, I complained.  So, I
: guess I'm getting my way now, with this patch.  I'm cool with it.

Reported-by: Robert Mueller <robm@fastmail.fm>
Signed-off-by: KOSAKI Motohiro <kosaki.motohiro@jp.fujitsu.com>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Reviewed-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: "Luck, Tony" <tony.luck@intel.com>
Acked-by: Dave Hansen <dave@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
include/linux/topology.h