genirq: Prevent oneshot irq thread race
authorThomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Tue, 9 Mar 2010 18:45:54 +0000 (19:45 +0100)
committerThomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Wed, 10 Mar 2010 16:45:14 +0000 (17:45 +0100)
commit0b1adaa031a55e44f5dd942f234bf09d28e8a0d6
tree354aa6cbfbcd856226c543b9f263f87864245065
parent522dba7134d6b2e5821d3457f7941ec34f668e6d
genirq: Prevent oneshot irq thread race

Lars-Peter pointed out that the oneshot threaded interrupt handler
code has the following race:

 CPU0                            CPU1
 hande_level_irq(irq X)
   mask_ack_irq(irq X)
   handle_IRQ_event(irq X)
     wake_up(thread_handler)
                                 thread handler(irq X) runs
                                 finalize_oneshot(irq X)
  does not unmask due to
  !(desc->status & IRQ_MASKED)

 return from irq
 does not unmask due to
 (desc->status & IRQ_ONESHOT)

This leaves the interrupt line masked forever.

The reason for this is the inconsistent handling of the IRQ_MASKED
flag. Instead of setting it in the mask function the oneshot support
sets the flag after waking up the irq thread.

The solution for this is to set/clear the IRQ_MASKED status whenever
we mask/unmask an interrupt line. That's the easy part, but that
cleanup opens another race:

 CPU0                            CPU1
 hande_level_irq(irq)
   mask_ack_irq(irq)
   handle_IRQ_event(irq)
     wake_up(thread_handler)
                                 thread handler(irq) runs
                                 finalize_oneshot_irq(irq)
  unmask(irq)
     irq triggers again
     handle_level_irq(irq)
       mask_ack_irq(irq)
     return from irq due to IRQ_INPROGRESS

 return from irq
 does not unmask due to
 (desc->status & IRQ_ONESHOT)

This requires that we synchronize finalize_oneshot_irq() with the
primary handler. If IRQ_INPROGESS is set we wait until the primary
handler on the other CPU has returned before unmasking the interrupt
line again.

We probably have never seen that problem because it does not happen on
UP and on SMP the irqbalancer protects us by pinning the primary
handler and the thread to the same CPU.

Reported-by: Lars-Peter Clausen <lars@metafoo.de>
Signed-off-by: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: stable@kernel.org
kernel/irq/chip.c
kernel/irq/manage.c