block: make gendisk hold a reference to its queue
[linux-2.6.git] / fs / Kconfig
index f54a157..9fe0b34 100644 (file)
@@ -6,61 +6,9 @@ menu "File systems"
 
 if BLOCK
 
-config EXT2_FS
-       tristate "Second extended fs support"
-       help
-         Ext2 is a standard Linux file system for hard disks.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called ext2.
-
-         If unsure, say Y.
-
-config EXT2_FS_XATTR
-       bool "Ext2 extended attributes"
-       depends on EXT2_FS
-       help
-         Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
-         the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
-         <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config EXT2_FS_POSIX_ACL
-       bool "Ext2 POSIX Access Control Lists"
-       depends on EXT2_FS_XATTR
-       select FS_POSIX_ACL
-       help
-         Posix Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
-         groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
-
-         To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the Posix ACLs for
-         Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
-
-         If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
-
-config EXT2_FS_SECURITY
-       bool "Ext2 Security Labels"
-       depends on EXT2_FS_XATTR
-       help
-         Security labels support alternative access control models
-         implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
-         enables an extended attribute handler for file security
-         labels in the ext2 filesystem.
-
-         If you are not using a security module that requires using
-         extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
-
-config EXT2_FS_XIP
-       bool "Ext2 execute in place support"
-       depends on EXT2_FS && MMU
-       help
-         Execute in place can be used on memory-backed block devices. If you
-         enable this option, you can select to mount block devices which are
-         capable of this feature without using the page cache.
-
-         If you do not use a block device that is capable of using this,
-         or if unsure, say N.
+source "fs/ext2/Kconfig"
+source "fs/ext3/Kconfig"
+source "fs/ext4/Kconfig"
 
 config FS_XIP
 # execute in place
@@ -68,665 +16,80 @@ config FS_XIP
        depends on EXT2_FS_XIP
        default y
 
-config EXT3_FS
-       tristate "Ext3 journalling file system support"
-       select JBD
-       help
-         This is the journalling version of the Second extended file system
-         (often called ext3), the de facto standard Linux file system
-         (method to organize files on a storage device) for hard disks.
-
-         The journalling code included in this driver means you do not have
-         to run e2fsck (file system checker) on your file systems after a
-         crash.  The journal keeps track of any changes that were being made
-         at the time the system crashed, and can ensure that your file system
-         is consistent without the need for a lengthy check.
-
-         Other than adding the journal to the file system, the on-disk format
-         of ext3 is identical to ext2.  It is possible to freely switch
-         between using the ext3 driver and the ext2 driver, as long as the
-         file system has been cleanly unmounted, or e2fsck is run on the file
-         system.
-
-         To add a journal on an existing ext2 file system or change the
-         behavior of ext3 file systems, you can use the tune2fs utility ("man
-         tune2fs").  To modify attributes of files and directories on ext3
-         file systems, use chattr ("man chattr").  You need to be using
-         e2fsprogs version 1.20 or later in order to create ext3 journals
-         (available at <http://sourceforge.net/projects/e2fsprogs/>).
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called ext3.
-
-config EXT3_FS_XATTR
-       bool "Ext3 extended attributes"
-       depends on EXT3_FS
-       default y
-       help
-         Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
-         the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
-         <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-         You need this for POSIX ACL support on ext3.
-
-config EXT3_FS_POSIX_ACL
-       bool "Ext3 POSIX Access Control Lists"
-       depends on EXT3_FS_XATTR
-       select FS_POSIX_ACL
-       help
-         Posix Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
-         groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
-
-         To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the Posix ACLs for
-         Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
-
-         If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
-
-config EXT3_FS_SECURITY
-       bool "Ext3 Security Labels"
-       depends on EXT3_FS_XATTR
-       help
-         Security labels support alternative access control models
-         implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
-         enables an extended attribute handler for file security
-         labels in the ext3 filesystem.
-
-         If you are not using a security module that requires using
-         extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
-
-config EXT4_FS
-       tristate "The Extended 4 (ext4) filesystem"
-       select JBD2
-       select CRC16
-       help
-         This is the next generation of the ext3 filesystem.
-
-         Unlike the change from ext2 filesystem to ext3 filesystem,
-         the on-disk format of ext4 is not forwards compatible with
-         ext3; it is based on extent maps and it supports 48-bit
-         physical block numbers.  The ext4 filesystem also supports delayed
-         allocation, persistent preallocation, high resolution time stamps,
-         and a number of other features to improve performance and speed
-         up fsck time.  For more information, please see the web pages at
-         http://ext4.wiki.kernel.org.
-
-         The ext4 filesystem will support mounting an ext3
-         filesystem; while there will be some performance gains from
-         the delayed allocation and inode table readahead, the best
-         performance gains will require enabling ext4 features in the
-         filesystem, or formating a new filesystem as an ext4
-         filesystem initially.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here. The
-         module will be called ext4dev.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config EXT4DEV_COMPAT
-       bool "Enable ext4dev compatibility"
-       depends on EXT4_FS
-       help
-         Starting with 2.6.28, the name of the ext4 filesystem was
-         renamed from ext4dev to ext4.  Unfortunately there are some
-         legacy userspace programs (such as klibc's fstype) have
-         "ext4dev" hardcoded.
-
-         To enable backwards compatibility so that systems that are
-         still expecting to mount ext4 filesystems using ext4dev,
-         chose Y here.   This feature will go away by 2.6.31, so
-         please arrange to get your userspace programs fixed!
-
-config EXT4_FS_XATTR
-       bool "Ext4 extended attributes"
-       depends on EXT4_FS
-       default y
-       help
-         Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
-         the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
-         <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-         You need this for POSIX ACL support on ext4.
-
-config EXT4_FS_POSIX_ACL
-       bool "Ext4 POSIX Access Control Lists"
-       depends on EXT4_FS_XATTR
-       select FS_POSIX_ACL
-       help
-         POSIX Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
-         groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
-
-         To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the POSIX ACLs for
-         Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
-
-         If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
-
-config EXT4_FS_SECURITY
-       bool "Ext4 Security Labels"
-       depends on EXT4_FS_XATTR
-       help
-         Security labels support alternative access control models
-         implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
-         enables an extended attribute handler for file security
-         labels in the ext4 filesystem.
-
-         If you are not using a security module that requires using
-         extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
-
-config JBD
-       tristate
-       help
-         This is a generic journalling layer for block devices.  It is
-         currently used by the ext3 and OCFS2 file systems, but it could
-         also be used to add journal support to other file systems or block
-         devices such as RAID or LVM.
-
-         If you are using the ext3 or OCFS2 file systems, you need to
-         say Y here. If you are not using ext3 OCFS2 then you will probably
-         want to say N.
-
-         To compile this device as a module, choose M here: the module will be
-         called jbd.  If you are compiling ext3 or OCFS2 into the kernel,
-         you cannot compile this code as a module.
-
-config JBD_DEBUG
-       bool "JBD (ext3) debugging support"
-       depends on JBD && DEBUG_FS
-       help
-         If you are using the ext3 journaled file system (or potentially any
-         other file system/device using JBD), this option allows you to
-         enable debugging output while the system is running, in order to
-         help track down any problems you are having.  By default the
-         debugging output will be turned off.
-
-         If you select Y here, then you will be able to turn on debugging
-         with "echo N > /sys/kernel/debug/jbd/jbd-debug", where N is a
-         number between 1 and 5, the higher the number, the more debugging
-         output is generated.  To turn debugging off again, do
-         "echo 0 > /sys/kernel/debug/jbd/jbd-debug".
-
-config JBD2
-       tristate
-       select CRC32
-       help
-         This is a generic journaling layer for block devices that support
-         both 32-bit and 64-bit block numbers.  It is currently used by
-         the ext4 filesystem, but it could also be used to add
-         journal support to other file systems or block devices such
-         as RAID or LVM.
-
-         If you are using ext4, you need to say Y here. If you are not
-         using ext4 then you will probably want to say N.
-
-         To compile this device as a module, choose M here. The module will be
-         called jbd2.  If you are compiling ext4 into the kernel,
-         you cannot compile this code as a module.
-
-config JBD2_DEBUG
-       bool "JBD2 (ext4) debugging support"
-       depends on JBD2 && DEBUG_FS
-       help
-         If you are using the ext4 journaled file system (or
-         potentially any other filesystem/device using JBD2), this option
-         allows you to enable debugging output while the system is running,
-         in order to help track down any problems you are having.
-         By default, the debugging output will be turned off.
-
-         If you select Y here, then you will be able to turn on debugging
-         with "echo N > /sys/kernel/debug/jbd2/jbd2-debug", where N is a
-         number between 1 and 5. The higher the number, the more debugging
-         output is generated.  To turn debugging off again, do
-         "echo 0 > /sys/kernel/debug/jbd2/jbd2-debug".
+source "fs/jbd/Kconfig"
+source "fs/jbd2/Kconfig"
 
 config FS_MBCACHE
 # Meta block cache for Extended Attributes (ext2/ext3/ext4)
        tristate
-       depends on EXT2_FS_XATTR || EXT3_FS_XATTR || EXT4_FS_XATTR
-       default y if EXT2_FS=y || EXT3_FS=y || EXT4_FS=y
-       default m if EXT2_FS=m || EXT3_FS=m || EXT4_FS=m
-
-config REISERFS_FS
-       tristate "Reiserfs support"
-       help
-         Stores not just filenames but the files themselves in a balanced
-         tree.  Uses journalling.
-
-         Balanced trees are more efficient than traditional file system
-         architectural foundations.
-
-         In general, ReiserFS is as fast as ext2, but is very efficient with
-         large directories and small files.  Additional patches are needed
-         for NFS and quotas, please see <http://www.namesys.com/> for links.
-
-         It is more easily extended to have features currently found in
-         database and keyword search systems than block allocation based file
-         systems are.  The next version will be so extended, and will support
-         plugins consistent with our motto ``It takes more than a license to
-         make source code open.''
-
-         Read <http://www.namesys.com/> to learn more about reiserfs.
-
-         Sponsored by Threshold Networks, Emusic.com, and Bigstorage.com.
-
-         If you like it, you can pay us to add new features to it that you
-         need, buy a support contract, or pay us to port it to another OS.
-
-config REISERFS_CHECK
-       bool "Enable reiserfs debug mode"
-       depends on REISERFS_FS
-       help
-         If you set this to Y, then ReiserFS will perform every check it can
-         possibly imagine of its internal consistency throughout its
-         operation.  It will also go substantially slower.  More than once we
-         have forgotten that this was on, and then gone despondent over the
-         latest benchmarks.:-) Use of this option allows our team to go all
-         out in checking for consistency when debugging without fear of its
-         effect on end users.  If you are on the verge of sending in a bug
-         report, say Y and you might get a useful error message.  Almost
-         everyone should say N.
-
-config REISERFS_PROC_INFO
-       bool "Stats in /proc/fs/reiserfs"
-       depends on REISERFS_FS && PROC_FS
-       help
-         Create under /proc/fs/reiserfs a hierarchy of files, displaying
-         various ReiserFS statistics and internal data at the expense of
-         making your kernel or module slightly larger (+8 KB). This also
-         increases the amount of kernel memory required for each mount.
-         Almost everyone but ReiserFS developers and people fine-tuning
-         reiserfs or tracing problems should say N.
-
-config REISERFS_FS_XATTR
-       bool "ReiserFS extended attributes"
-       depends on REISERFS_FS
-       help
-         Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
-         the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
-         <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config REISERFS_FS_POSIX_ACL
-       bool "ReiserFS POSIX Access Control Lists"
-       depends on REISERFS_FS_XATTR
-       select FS_POSIX_ACL
-       help
-         Posix Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
-         groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
-
-         To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the Posix ACLs for
-         Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
-
-         If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
-
-config REISERFS_FS_SECURITY
-       bool "ReiserFS Security Labels"
-       depends on REISERFS_FS_XATTR
-       help
-         Security labels support alternative access control models
-         implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
-         enables an extended attribute handler for file security
-         labels in the ReiserFS filesystem.
-
-         If you are not using a security module that requires using
-         extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
-
-config JFS_FS
-       tristate "JFS filesystem support"
-       select NLS
-       help
-         This is a port of IBM's Journaled Filesystem .  More information is
-         available in the file <file:Documentation/filesystems/jfs.txt>.
-
-         If you do not intend to use the JFS filesystem, say N.
-
-config JFS_POSIX_ACL
-       bool "JFS POSIX Access Control Lists"
-       depends on JFS_FS
-       select FS_POSIX_ACL
-       help
-         Posix Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
-         groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
-
-         To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the Posix ACLs for
-         Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
-
-         If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
-
-config JFS_SECURITY
-       bool "JFS Security Labels"
-       depends on JFS_FS
-       help
-         Security labels support alternative access control models
-         implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
-         enables an extended attribute handler for file security
-         labels in the jfs filesystem.
-
-         If you are not using a security module that requires using
-         extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
-
-config JFS_DEBUG
-       bool "JFS debugging"
-       depends on JFS_FS
-       help
-         If you are experiencing any problems with the JFS filesystem, say
-         Y here.  This will result in additional debugging messages to be
-         written to the system log.  Under normal circumstances, this
-         results in very little overhead.
-
-config JFS_STATISTICS
-       bool "JFS statistics"
-       depends on JFS_FS
-       help
-         Enabling this option will cause statistics from the JFS file system
-         to be made available to the user in the /proc/fs/jfs/ directory.
+       default y if EXT2_FS=y && EXT2_FS_XATTR
+       default y if EXT3_FS=y && EXT3_FS_XATTR
+       default y if EXT4_FS=y && EXT4_FS_XATTR
+       default m if EXT2_FS_XATTR || EXT3_FS_XATTR || EXT4_FS_XATTR
 
-config FS_POSIX_ACL
-# Posix ACL utility routines (for now, only ext2/ext3/jfs/reiserfs/nfs4)
-#
-# NOTE: you can implement Posix ACLs without these helpers (XFS does).
-#      Never use this symbol for ifdefs.
-#
-       bool
-       default n
+source "fs/reiserfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/jfs/Kconfig"
 
 source "fs/xfs/Kconfig"
 source "fs/gfs2/Kconfig"
-
-config OCFS2_FS
-       tristate "OCFS2 file system support"
-       depends on NET && SYSFS
-       select CONFIGFS_FS
-       select JBD
-       select CRC32
-       help
-         OCFS2 is a general purpose extent based shared disk cluster file
-         system with many similarities to ext3. It supports 64 bit inode
-         numbers, and has automatically extending metadata groups which may
-         also make it attractive for non-clustered use.
-
-         You'll want to install the ocfs2-tools package in order to at least
-         get "mount.ocfs2".
-
-         Project web page:    http://oss.oracle.com/projects/ocfs2
-         Tools web page:      http://oss.oracle.com/projects/ocfs2-tools
-         OCFS2 mailing lists: http://oss.oracle.com/projects/ocfs2/mailman/
-
-         For more information on OCFS2, see the file
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/ocfs2.txt>.
-
-config OCFS2_FS_O2CB
-       tristate "O2CB Kernelspace Clustering"
-       depends on OCFS2_FS
-       default y
-       help
-         OCFS2 includes a simple kernelspace clustering package, the OCFS2
-         Cluster Base.  It only requires a very small userspace component
-         to configure it. This comes with the standard ocfs2-tools package.
-         O2CB is limited to maintaining a cluster for OCFS2 file systems.
-         It cannot manage any other cluster applications.
-
-         It is always safe to say Y here, as the clustering method is
-         run-time selectable.
-
-config OCFS2_FS_USERSPACE_CLUSTER
-       tristate "OCFS2 Userspace Clustering"
-       depends on OCFS2_FS && DLM
-       default y
-       help
-         This option will allow OCFS2 to use userspace clustering services
-         in conjunction with the DLM in fs/dlm.  If you are using a
-         userspace cluster manager, say Y here.
-
-         It is safe to say Y, as the clustering method is run-time
-         selectable.
-
-config OCFS2_FS_STATS
-       bool "OCFS2 statistics"
-       depends on OCFS2_FS
-       default y
-       help
-         This option allows some fs statistics to be captured. Enabling
-         this option may increase the memory consumption.
-
-config OCFS2_DEBUG_MASKLOG
-       bool "OCFS2 logging support"
-       depends on OCFS2_FS
-       default y
-       help
-         The ocfs2 filesystem has an extensive logging system.  The system
-         allows selection of events to log via files in /sys/o2cb/logmask/.
-         This option will enlarge your kernel, but it allows debugging of
-         ocfs2 filesystem issues.
-
-config OCFS2_DEBUG_FS
-       bool "OCFS2 expensive checks"
-       depends on OCFS2_FS
-       default n
-       help
-         This option will enable expensive consistency checks. Enable
-         this option for debugging only as it is likely to decrease
-         performance of the filesystem.
+source "fs/ocfs2/Kconfig"
+source "fs/btrfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/nilfs2/Kconfig"
 
 endif # BLOCK
 
-config DNOTIFY
-       bool "Dnotify support"
-       default y
-       help
-         Dnotify is a directory-based per-fd file change notification system
-         that uses signals to communicate events to user-space.  There exist
-         superior alternatives, but some applications may still rely on
-         dnotify.
-
-         If unsure, say Y.
-
-config INOTIFY
-       bool "Inotify file change notification support"
-       default y
-       ---help---
-         Say Y here to enable inotify support.  Inotify is a file change
-         notification system and a replacement for dnotify.  Inotify fixes
-         numerous shortcomings in dnotify and introduces several new features
-         including multiple file events, one-shot support, and unmount
-         notification.
-
-         For more information, see <file:Documentation/filesystems/inotify.txt>
-
-         If unsure, say Y.
-
-config INOTIFY_USER
-       bool "Inotify support for userspace"
-       depends on INOTIFY
-       default y
-       ---help---
-         Say Y here to enable inotify support for userspace, including the
-         associated system calls.  Inotify allows monitoring of both files and
-         directories via a single open fd.  Events are read from the file
-         descriptor, which is also select()- and poll()-able.
-
-         For more information, see <file:Documentation/filesystems/inotify.txt>
-
-         If unsure, say Y.
-
-config QUOTA
-       bool "Quota support"
-       help
-         If you say Y here, you will be able to set per user limits for disk
-         usage (also called disk quotas). Currently, it works for the
-         ext2, ext3, and reiserfs file system. ext3 also supports journalled
-         quotas for which you don't need to run quotacheck(8) after an unclean
-         shutdown.
-         For further details, read the Quota mini-HOWTO, available from
-         <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, or the documentation provided
-         with the quota tools. Probably the quota support is only useful for
-         multi user systems. If unsure, say N.
-
-config QUOTA_NETLINK_INTERFACE
-       bool "Report quota messages through netlink interface"
-       depends on QUOTA && NET
-       help
-         If you say Y here, quota warnings (about exceeding softlimit, reaching
-         hardlimit, etc.) will be reported through netlink interface. If unsure,
-         say Y.
-
-config PRINT_QUOTA_WARNING
-       bool "Print quota warnings to console (OBSOLETE)"
-       depends on QUOTA
-       default y
-       help
-         If you say Y here, quota warnings (about exceeding softlimit, reaching
-         hardlimit, etc.) will be printed to the process' controlling terminal.
-         Note that this behavior is currently deprecated and may go away in
-         future. Please use notification via netlink socket instead.
-
-config QFMT_V1
-       tristate "Old quota format support"
-       depends on QUOTA
-       help
-         This quota format was (is) used by kernels earlier than 2.4.22. If
-         you have quota working and you don't want to convert to new quota
-         format say Y here.
+# Posix ACL utility routines
+#
+# Note: Posix ACLs can be implemented without these helpers.  Never use
+# this symbol for ifdefs in core code.
+#
+config FS_POSIX_ACL
+       def_bool n
 
-config QFMT_V2
-       tristate "Quota format v2 support"
-       depends on QUOTA
-       help
-         This quota format allows using quotas with 32-bit UIDs/GIDs. If you
-         need this functionality say Y here.
+config EXPORTFS
+       tristate
 
-config QUOTACTL
-       bool
-       depends on XFS_QUOTA || QUOTA
+config FILE_LOCKING
+       bool "Enable POSIX file locking API" if EXPERT
        default y
-
-config AUTOFS_FS
-       tristate "Kernel automounter support"
        help
-         The automounter is a tool to automatically mount remote file systems
-         on demand. This implementation is partially kernel-based to reduce
-         overhead in the already-mounted case; this is unlike the BSD
-         automounter (amd), which is a pure user space daemon.
-
-         To use the automounter you need the user-space tools from the autofs
-         package; you can find the location in <file:Documentation/Changes>.
-         You also want to answer Y to "NFS file system support", below.
+         This option enables standard file locking support, required
+          for filesystems like NFS and for the flock() system
+          call. Disabling this option saves about 11k.
 
-         If you want to use the newer version of the automounter with more
-         features, say N here and say Y to "Kernel automounter v4 support",
-         below.
+source "fs/notify/Kconfig"
 
-         To compile this support as a module, choose M here: the module will be
-         called autofs.
+source "fs/quota/Kconfig"
 
-         If you are not a part of a fairly large, distributed network, you
-         probably do not need an automounter, and can say N here.
+source "fs/autofs4/Kconfig"
+source "fs/fuse/Kconfig"
 
-config AUTOFS4_FS
-       tristate "Kernel automounter version 4 support (also supports v3)"
-       help
-         The automounter is a tool to automatically mount remote file systems
-         on demand. This implementation is partially kernel-based to reduce
-         overhead in the already-mounted case; this is unlike the BSD
-         automounter (amd), which is a pure user space daemon.
-
-         To use the automounter you need the user-space tools from
-         <ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/daemons/autofs/v4/>; you also
-         want to answer Y to "NFS file system support", below.
-
-         To compile this support as a module, choose M here: the module will be
-         called autofs4.  You will need to add "alias autofs autofs4" to your
-         modules configuration file.
-
-         If you are not a part of a fairly large, distributed network or
-         don't have a laptop which needs to dynamically reconfigure to the
-         local network, you probably do not need an automounter, and can say
-         N here.
-
-config FUSE_FS
-       tristate "Filesystem in Userspace support"
+config CUSE
+       tristate "Character device in Userspace support"
+       depends on FUSE_FS
        help
-         With FUSE it is possible to implement a fully functional filesystem
-         in a userspace program.
+         This FUSE extension allows character devices to be
+         implemented in userspace.
 
-         There's also companion library: libfuse.  This library along with
-         utilities is available from the FUSE homepage:
-         <http://fuse.sourceforge.net/>
-
-         See <file:Documentation/filesystems/fuse.txt> for more information.
-         See <file:Documentation/Changes> for needed library/utility version.
-
-         If you want to develop a userspace FS, or if you want to use
-         a filesystem based on FUSE, answer Y or M.
+         If you want to develop or use userspace character device
+         based on CUSE, answer Y or M.
 
 config GENERIC_ACL
        bool
        select FS_POSIX_ACL
 
-if BLOCK
-menu "CD-ROM/DVD Filesystems"
+menu "Caches"
 
-config ISO9660_FS
-       tristate "ISO 9660 CDROM file system support"
-       help
-         This is the standard file system used on CD-ROMs.  It was previously
-         known as "High Sierra File System" and is called "hsfs" on other
-         Unix systems.  The so-called Rock-Ridge extensions which allow for
-         long Unix filenames and symbolic links are also supported by this
-         driver.  If you have a CD-ROM drive and want to do more with it than
-         just listen to audio CDs and watch its LEDs, say Y (and read
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/isofs.txt> and the CD-ROM-HOWTO,
-         available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>), thereby
-         enlarging your kernel by about 27 KB; otherwise say N.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called isofs.
-
-config JOLIET
-       bool "Microsoft Joliet CDROM extensions"
-       depends on ISO9660_FS
-       select NLS
-       help
-         Joliet is a Microsoft extension for the ISO 9660 CD-ROM file system
-         which allows for long filenames in unicode format (unicode is the
-         new 16 bit character code, successor to ASCII, which encodes the
-         characters of almost all languages of the world; see
-         <http://www.unicode.org/> for more information).  Say Y here if you
-         want to be able to read Joliet CD-ROMs under Linux.
-
-config ZISOFS
-       bool "Transparent decompression extension"
-       depends on ISO9660_FS
-       select ZLIB_INFLATE
-       help
-         This is a Linux-specific extension to RockRidge which lets you store
-         data in compressed form on a CD-ROM and have it transparently
-         decompressed when the CD-ROM is accessed.  See
-         <http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/fs/zisofs/> for the tools
-         necessary to create such a filesystem.  Say Y here if you want to be
-         able to read such compressed CD-ROMs.
-
-config UDF_FS
-       tristate "UDF file system support"
-       select CRC_ITU_T
-       help
-         This is the new file system used on some CD-ROMs and DVDs. Say Y if
-         you intend to mount DVD discs or CDRW's written in packet mode, or
-         if written to by other UDF utilities, such as DirectCD.
-         Please read <file:Documentation/filesystems/udf.txt>.
+source "fs/fscache/Kconfig"
+source "fs/cachefiles/Kconfig"
 
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called udf.
+endmenu
 
-         If unsure, say N.
+if BLOCK
+menu "CD-ROM/DVD Filesystems"
 
-config UDF_NLS
-       bool
-       default y
-       depends on (UDF_FS=m && NLS) || (UDF_FS=y && NLS=y)
+source "fs/isofs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/udf/Kconfig"
 
 endmenu
 endif # BLOCK
@@ -734,182 +97,8 @@ endif # BLOCK
 if BLOCK
 menu "DOS/FAT/NT Filesystems"
 
-config FAT_FS
-       tristate
-       select NLS
-       help
-         If you want to use one of the FAT-based file systems (the MS-DOS and
-         VFAT (Windows 95) file systems), then you must say Y or M here
-         to include FAT support. You will then be able to mount partitions or
-         diskettes with FAT-based file systems and transparently access the
-         files on them, i.e. MSDOS files will look and behave just like all
-         other Unix files.
-
-         This FAT support is not a file system in itself, it only provides
-         the foundation for the other file systems. You will have to say Y or
-         M to at least one of "MSDOS fs support" or "VFAT fs support" in
-         order to make use of it.
-
-         Another way to read and write MSDOS floppies and hard drive
-         partitions from within Linux (but not transparently) is with the
-         mtools ("man mtools") program suite. You don't need to say Y here in
-         order to do that.
-
-         If you need to move large files on floppies between a DOS and a
-         Linux box, say Y here, mount the floppy under Linux with an MSDOS
-         file system and use GNU tar's M option. GNU tar is a program
-         available for Unix and DOS ("man tar" or "info tar").
-
-         The FAT support will enlarge your kernel by about 37 KB. If unsure,
-         say Y.
-
-         To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
-         fat.  Note that if you compile the FAT support as a module, you
-         cannot compile any of the FAT-based file systems into the kernel
-         -- they will have to be modules as well.
-
-config MSDOS_FS
-       tristate "MSDOS fs support"
-       select FAT_FS
-       help
-         This allows you to mount MSDOS partitions of your hard drive (unless
-         they are compressed; to access compressed MSDOS partitions under
-         Linux, you can either use the DOS emulator DOSEMU, described in the
-         DOSEMU-HOWTO, available from
-         <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, or try dmsdosfs in
-         <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/filesystems/dosfs/>. If you
-         intend to use dosemu with a non-compressed MSDOS partition, say Y
-         here) and MSDOS floppies. This means that file access becomes
-         transparent, i.e. the MSDOS files look and behave just like all
-         other Unix files.
-
-         If you have Windows 95 or Windows NT installed on your MSDOS
-         partitions, you should use the VFAT file system (say Y to "VFAT fs
-         support" below), or you will not be able to see the long filenames
-         generated by Windows 95 / Windows NT.
-
-         This option will enlarge your kernel by about 7 KB. If unsure,
-         answer Y. This will only work if you said Y to "DOS FAT fs support"
-         as well. To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will
-         be called msdos.
-
-config VFAT_FS
-       tristate "VFAT (Windows-95) fs support"
-       select FAT_FS
-       help
-         This option provides support for normal Windows file systems with
-         long filenames.  That includes non-compressed FAT-based file systems
-         used by Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT 4.0, and the Unix
-         programs from the mtools package.
-
-         The VFAT support enlarges your kernel by about 10 KB and it only
-         works if you said Y to the "DOS FAT fs support" above.  Please read
-         the file <file:Documentation/filesystems/vfat.txt> for details.  If
-         unsure, say Y.
-
-         To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
-         vfat.
-
-config FAT_DEFAULT_CODEPAGE
-       int "Default codepage for FAT"
-       depends on MSDOS_FS || VFAT_FS
-       default 437
-       help
-         This option should be set to the codepage of your FAT filesystems.
-         It can be overridden with the "codepage" mount option.
-         See <file:Documentation/filesystems/vfat.txt> for more information.
-
-config FAT_DEFAULT_IOCHARSET
-       string "Default iocharset for FAT"
-       depends on VFAT_FS
-       default "iso8859-1"
-       help
-         Set this to the default input/output character set you'd
-         like FAT to use. It should probably match the character set
-         that most of your FAT filesystems use, and can be overridden
-         with the "iocharset" mount option for FAT filesystems.
-         Note that "utf8" is not recommended for FAT filesystems.
-         If unsure, you shouldn't set "utf8" here.
-         See <file:Documentation/filesystems/vfat.txt> for more information.
-
-config NTFS_FS
-       tristate "NTFS file system support"
-       select NLS
-       help
-         NTFS is the file system of Microsoft Windows NT, 2000, XP and 2003.
-
-         Saying Y or M here enables read support.  There is partial, but
-         safe, write support available.  For write support you must also
-         say Y to "NTFS write support" below.
-
-         There are also a number of user-space tools available, called
-         ntfsprogs.  These include ntfsundelete and ntfsresize, that work
-         without NTFS support enabled in the kernel.
-
-         This is a rewrite from scratch of Linux NTFS support and replaced
-         the old NTFS code starting with Linux 2.5.11.  A backport to
-         the Linux 2.4 kernel series is separately available as a patch
-         from the project web site.
-
-         For more information see <file:Documentation/filesystems/ntfs.txt>
-         and <http://www.linux-ntfs.org/>.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called ntfs.
-
-         If you are not using Windows NT, 2000, XP or 2003 in addition to
-         Linux on your computer it is safe to say N.
-
-config NTFS_DEBUG
-       bool "NTFS debugging support"
-       depends on NTFS_FS
-       help
-         If you are experiencing any problems with the NTFS file system, say
-         Y here.  This will result in additional consistency checks to be
-         performed by the driver as well as additional debugging messages to
-         be written to the system log.  Note that debugging messages are
-         disabled by default.  To enable them, supply the option debug_msgs=1
-         at the kernel command line when booting the kernel or as an option
-         to insmod when loading the ntfs module.  Once the driver is active,
-         you can enable debugging messages by doing (as root):
-         echo 1 > /proc/sys/fs/ntfs-debug
-         Replacing the "1" with "0" would disable debug messages.
-
-         If you leave debugging messages disabled, this results in little
-         overhead, but enabling debug messages results in very significant
-         slowdown of the system.
-
-         When reporting bugs, please try to have available a full dump of
-         debugging messages while the misbehaviour was occurring.
-
-config NTFS_RW
-       bool "NTFS write support"
-       depends on NTFS_FS
-       help
-         This enables the partial, but safe, write support in the NTFS driver.
-
-         The only supported operation is overwriting existing files, without
-         changing the file length.  No file or directory creation, deletion or
-         renaming is possible.  Note only non-resident files can be written to
-         so you may find that some very small files (<500 bytes or so) cannot
-         be written to.
-
-         While we cannot guarantee that it will not damage any data, we have
-         so far not received a single report where the driver would have
-         damaged someones data so we assume it is perfectly safe to use.
-
-         Note:  While write support is safe in this version (a rewrite from
-         scratch of the NTFS support), it should be noted that the old NTFS
-         write support, included in Linux 2.5.10 and before (since 1997),
-         is not safe.
-
-         This is currently useful with TopologiLinux.  TopologiLinux is run
-         on top of any DOS/Microsoft Windows system without partitioning your
-         hard disk.  Unlike other Linux distributions TopologiLinux does not
-         need its own partition.  For more information see
-         <http://topologi-linux.sourceforge.net/>
-
-         It is perfectly safe to say N here.
+source "fs/fat/Kconfig"
+source "fs/ntfs/Kconfig"
 
 endmenu
 endif # BLOCK
@@ -917,33 +106,11 @@ endif # BLOCK
 menu "Pseudo filesystems"
 
 source "fs/proc/Kconfig"
-
-config SYSFS
-       bool "sysfs file system support" if EMBEDDED
-       default y
-       help
-       The sysfs filesystem is a virtual filesystem that the kernel uses to
-       export internal kernel objects, their attributes, and their
-       relationships to one another.
-
-       Users can use sysfs to ascertain useful information about the running
-       kernel, such as the devices the kernel has discovered on each bus and
-       which driver each is bound to. sysfs can also be used to tune devices
-       and other kernel subsystems.
-
-       Some system agents rely on the information in sysfs to operate.
-       /sbin/hotplug uses device and object attributes in sysfs to assist in
-       delegating policy decisions, like persistently naming devices.
-
-       sysfs is currently used by the block subsystem to mount the root
-       partition.  If sysfs is disabled you must specify the boot device on
-       the kernel boot command line via its major and minor numbers.  For
-       example, "root=03:01" for /dev/hda1.
-
-       Designers of embedded systems may wish to say N here to conserve space.
+source "fs/sysfs/Kconfig"
 
 config TMPFS
        bool "Virtual memory file system support (former shm fs)"
+       depends on SHMEM
        help
          Tmpfs is a file system which keeps all files in virtual memory.
 
@@ -957,20 +124,44 @@ config TMPFS
 config TMPFS_POSIX_ACL
        bool "Tmpfs POSIX Access Control Lists"
        depends on TMPFS
+       select TMPFS_XATTR
        select GENERIC_ACL
        help
-         POSIX Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
-         groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
+         POSIX Access Control Lists (ACLs) support additional access rights
+         for users and groups beyond the standard owner/group/world scheme,
+         and this option selects support for ACLs specifically for tmpfs
+         filesystems.
+
+         If you've selected TMPFS, it's possible that you'll also need
+         this option as there are a number of Linux distros that require
+         POSIX ACL support under /dev for certain features to work properly.
+         For example, some distros need this feature for ALSA-related /dev
+         files for sound to work properly.  In short, if you're not sure,
+         say Y.
 
          To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the POSIX ACLs for
          Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
 
-         If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N.
+config TMPFS_XATTR
+       bool "Tmpfs extended attributes"
+       depends on TMPFS
+       default n
+       help
+         Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
+         the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
+         <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
+
+         Currently this enables support for the trusted.* and
+         security.* namespaces.
+
+         You need this for POSIX ACL support on tmpfs.
+
+         If unsure, say N.
 
 config HUGETLBFS
        bool "HugeTLB file system support"
-       depends on X86 || IA64 || PPC64 || SPARC64 || (SUPERH && MMU) || \
-                  (S390 && 64BIT) || BROKEN
+       depends on X86 || IA64 || SPARC64 || (S390 && 64BIT) || \
+                  SYS_SUPPORTS_HUGETLBFS || BROKEN
        help
          hugetlbfs is a filesystem backing for HugeTLB pages, based on
          ramfs. For architectures that support it, say Y here and read
@@ -981,579 +172,51 @@ config HUGETLBFS
 config HUGETLB_PAGE
        def_bool HUGETLBFS
 
-config CONFIGFS_FS
-       tristate "Userspace-driven configuration filesystem"
-       depends on SYSFS
-       help
-         configfs is a ram-based filesystem that provides the converse
-         of sysfs's functionality. Where sysfs is a filesystem-based
-         view of kernel objects, configfs is a filesystem-based manager
-         of kernel objects, or config_items.
-
-         Both sysfs and configfs can and should exist together on the
-         same system. One is not a replacement for the other.
+source "fs/configfs/Kconfig"
 
 endmenu
 
-menu "Miscellaneous filesystems"
-
-config ADFS_FS
-       tristate "ADFS file system support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on BLOCK && EXPERIMENTAL
-       help
-         The Acorn Disc Filing System is the standard file system of the
-         RiscOS operating system which runs on Acorn's ARM-based Risc PC
-         systems and the Acorn Archimedes range of machines. If you say Y
-         here, Linux will be able to read from ADFS partitions on hard drives
-         and from ADFS-formatted floppy discs. If you also want to be able to
-         write to those devices, say Y to "ADFS write support" below.
-
-         The ADFS partition should be the first partition (i.e.,
-         /dev/[hs]d?1) on each of your drives. Please read the file
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/adfs.txt> for further details.
-
-         To compile this code as a module, choose M here: the module will be
-         called adfs.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config ADFS_FS_RW
-       bool "ADFS write support (DANGEROUS)"
-       depends on ADFS_FS
-       help
-         If you say Y here, you will be able to write to ADFS partitions on
-         hard drives and ADFS-formatted floppy disks. This is experimental
-         codes, so if you're unsure, say N.
-
-config AFFS_FS
-       tristate "Amiga FFS file system support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on BLOCK && EXPERIMENTAL
-       help
-         The Fast File System (FFS) is the common file system used on hard
-         disks by Amiga(tm) systems since AmigaOS Version 1.3 (34.20).  Say Y
-         if you want to be able to read and write files from and to an Amiga
-         FFS partition on your hard drive.  Amiga floppies however cannot be
-         read with this driver due to an incompatibility of the floppy
-         controller used in an Amiga and the standard floppy controller in
-         PCs and workstations. Read <file:Documentation/filesystems/affs.txt>
-         and <file:fs/affs/Changes>.
-
-         With this driver you can also mount disk files used by Bernd
-         Schmidt's Un*X Amiga Emulator
-         (<http://www.freiburg.linux.de/~uae/>).
-         If you want to do this, you will also need to say Y or M to "Loop
-         device support", above.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called affs.  If unsure, say N.
-
-config ECRYPT_FS
-       tristate "eCrypt filesystem layer support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on EXPERIMENTAL && KEYS && CRYPTO && NET
-       help
-         Encrypted filesystem that operates on the VFS layer.  See
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/ecryptfs.txt> to learn more about
-         eCryptfs.  Userspace components are required and can be
-         obtained from <http://ecryptfs.sf.net>.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called ecryptfs.
-
-config HFS_FS
-       tristate "Apple Macintosh file system support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on BLOCK && EXPERIMENTAL
-       select NLS
-       help
-         If you say Y here, you will be able to mount Macintosh-formatted
-         floppy disks and hard drive partitions with full read-write access.
-         Please read <file:Documentation/filesystems/hfs.txt> to learn about
-         the available mount options.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called hfs.
-
-config HFSPLUS_FS
-       tristate "Apple Extended HFS file system support"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       select NLS
-       select NLS_UTF8
-       help
-         If you say Y here, you will be able to mount extended format
-         Macintosh-formatted hard drive partitions with full read-write access.
-
-         This file system is often called HFS+ and was introduced with
-         MacOS 8. It includes all Mac specific filesystem data such as
-         data forks and creator codes, but it also has several UNIX
-         style features such as file ownership and permissions.
-
-config BEFS_FS
-       tristate "BeOS file system (BeFS) support (read only) (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on BLOCK && EXPERIMENTAL
-       select NLS
-       help
-         The BeOS File System (BeFS) is the native file system of Be, Inc's
-         BeOS. Notable features include support for arbitrary attributes
-         on files and directories, and database-like indices on selected
-         attributes. (Also note that this driver doesn't make those features
-         available at this time). It is a 64 bit filesystem, so it supports
-         extremely large volumes and files.
-
-         If you use this filesystem, you should also say Y to at least one
-         of the NLS (native language support) options below.
-
-         If you don't know what this is about, say N.
-
-         To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be
-         called befs.
-
-config BEFS_DEBUG
-       bool "Debug BeFS"
-       depends on BEFS_FS
-       help
-         If you say Y here, you can use the 'debug' mount option to enable
-         debugging output from the driver.
-
-config BFS_FS
-       tristate "BFS file system support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on BLOCK && EXPERIMENTAL
-       help
-         Boot File System (BFS) is a file system used under SCO UnixWare to
-         allow the bootloader access to the kernel image and other important
-         files during the boot process.  It is usually mounted under /stand
-         and corresponds to the slice marked as "STAND" in the UnixWare
-         partition.  You should say Y if you want to read or write the files
-         on your /stand slice from within Linux.  You then also need to say Y
-         to "UnixWare slices support", below.  More information about the BFS
-         file system is contained in the file
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/bfs.txt>.
-
-         If you don't know what this is about, say N.
-
-         To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
-         bfs.  Note that the file system of your root partition (the one
-         containing the directory /) cannot be compiled as a module.
-
-
-
-config EFS_FS
-       tristate "EFS file system support (read only) (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on BLOCK && EXPERIMENTAL
-       help
-         EFS is an older file system used for non-ISO9660 CD-ROMs and hard
-         disk partitions by SGI's IRIX operating system (IRIX 6.0 and newer
-         uses the XFS file system for hard disk partitions however).
-
-         This implementation only offers read-only access. If you don't know
-         what all this is about, it's safe to say N. For more information
-         about EFS see its home page at <http://aeschi.ch.eu.org/efs/>.
-
-         To compile the EFS file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called efs.
-
-config JFFS2_FS
-       tristate "Journalling Flash File System v2 (JFFS2) support"
-       select CRC32
-       depends on MTD
-       help
-         JFFS2 is the second generation of the Journalling Flash File System
-         for use on diskless embedded devices. It provides improved wear
-         levelling, compression and support for hard links. You cannot use
-         this on normal block devices, only on 'MTD' devices.
-
-         Further information on the design and implementation of JFFS2 is
-         available at <http://sources.redhat.com/jffs2/>.
-
-config JFFS2_FS_DEBUG
-       int "JFFS2 debugging verbosity (0 = quiet, 2 = noisy)"
-       depends on JFFS2_FS
-       default "0"
-       help
-         This controls the amount of debugging messages produced by the JFFS2
-         code. Set it to zero for use in production systems. For evaluation,
-         testing and debugging, it's advisable to set it to one. This will
-         enable a few assertions and will print debugging messages at the
-         KERN_DEBUG loglevel, where they won't normally be visible. Level 2
-         is unlikely to be useful - it enables extra debugging in certain
-         areas which at one point needed debugging, but when the bugs were
-         located and fixed, the detailed messages were relegated to level 2.
-
-         If reporting bugs, please try to have available a full dump of the
-         messages at debug level 1 while the misbehaviour was occurring.
-
-config JFFS2_FS_WRITEBUFFER
-       bool "JFFS2 write-buffering support"
-       depends on JFFS2_FS
-       default y
-       help
-         This enables the write-buffering support in JFFS2.
-
-         This functionality is required to support JFFS2 on the following
-         types of flash devices:
-           - NAND flash
-           - NOR flash with transparent ECC
-           - DataFlash
-
-config JFFS2_FS_WBUF_VERIFY
-       bool "Verify JFFS2 write-buffer reads"
-       depends on JFFS2_FS_WRITEBUFFER
-       default n
-       help
-         This causes JFFS2 to read back every page written through the
-         write-buffer, and check for errors.
-
-config JFFS2_SUMMARY
-       bool "JFFS2 summary support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on JFFS2_FS && EXPERIMENTAL
-       default n
-       help
-         This feature makes it possible to use summary information
-         for faster filesystem mount.
-
-         The summary information can be inserted into a filesystem image
-         by the utility 'sumtool'.
-
-         If unsure, say 'N'.
-
-config JFFS2_FS_XATTR
-       bool "JFFS2 XATTR support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on JFFS2_FS && EXPERIMENTAL
-       default n
-       help
-         Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
-         the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
-         <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config JFFS2_FS_POSIX_ACL
-       bool "JFFS2 POSIX Access Control Lists"
-       depends on JFFS2_FS_XATTR
-       default y
-       select FS_POSIX_ACL
-       help
-         Posix Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
-         groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
-
-         To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the Posix ACLs for
-         Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
-
-         If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
-
-config JFFS2_FS_SECURITY
-       bool "JFFS2 Security Labels"
-       depends on JFFS2_FS_XATTR
-       default y
-       help
-         Security labels support alternative access control models
-         implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
-         enables an extended attribute handler for file security
-         labels in the jffs2 filesystem.
-
-         If you are not using a security module that requires using
-         extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
-
-config JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
-       bool "Advanced compression options for JFFS2"
-       depends on JFFS2_FS
-       default n
-       help
-         Enabling this option allows you to explicitly choose which
-         compression modules, if any, are enabled in JFFS2. Removing
-         compressors can mean you cannot read existing file systems,
-         and enabling experimental compressors can mean that you
-         write a file system which cannot be read by a standard kernel.
-
-         If unsure, you should _definitely_ say 'N'.
-
-config JFFS2_ZLIB
-       bool "JFFS2 ZLIB compression support" if JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
-       select ZLIB_INFLATE
-       select ZLIB_DEFLATE
-       depends on JFFS2_FS
-       default y
-       help
-         Zlib is designed to be a free, general-purpose, legally unencumbered,
-         lossless data-compression library for use on virtually any computer
-         hardware and operating system. See <http://www.gzip.org/zlib/> for
-         further information.
-
-         Say 'Y' if unsure.
-
-config JFFS2_LZO
-       bool "JFFS2 LZO compression support" if JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
-       select LZO_COMPRESS
-       select LZO_DECOMPRESS
-       depends on JFFS2_FS
-       default n
-       help
-         minilzo-based compression. Generally works better than Zlib.
-
-         This feature was added in July, 2007. Say 'N' if you need
-         compatibility with older bootloaders or kernels.
-
-config JFFS2_RTIME
-       bool "JFFS2 RTIME compression support" if JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
-       depends on JFFS2_FS
+menuconfig MISC_FILESYSTEMS
+       bool "Miscellaneous filesystems"
        default y
-       help
-         Rtime does manage to recompress already-compressed data. Say 'Y' if unsure.
-
-config JFFS2_RUBIN
-       bool "JFFS2 RUBIN compression support" if JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
-       depends on JFFS2_FS
-       default n
-       help
-         RUBINMIPS and DYNRUBIN compressors. Say 'N' if unsure.
-
-choice
-       prompt "JFFS2 default compression mode" if JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
-       default JFFS2_CMODE_PRIORITY
-       depends on JFFS2_FS
-       help
-         You can set here the default compression mode of JFFS2 from
-         the available compression modes. Don't touch if unsure.
-
-config JFFS2_CMODE_NONE
-       bool "no compression"
-       help
-         Uses no compression.
-
-config JFFS2_CMODE_PRIORITY
-       bool "priority"
-       help
-         Tries the compressors in a predefined order and chooses the first
-         successful one.
-
-config JFFS2_CMODE_SIZE
-       bool "size (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       help
-         Tries all compressors and chooses the one which has the smallest
-         result.
+       ---help---
+         Say Y here to get to see options for various miscellaneous
+         filesystems, such as filesystems that came from other
+         operating systems.
 
-config JFFS2_CMODE_FAVOURLZO
-       bool "Favour LZO"
-       help
-         Tries all compressors and chooses the one which has the smallest
-         result but gives some preference to LZO (which has faster
-         decompression) at the expense of size.
+         This option alone does not add any kernel code.
 
-endchoice
+         If you say N, all options in this submenu will be skipped and
+         disabled; if unsure, say Y here.
 
+if MISC_FILESYSTEMS
+
+source "fs/adfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/affs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/ecryptfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/hfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/hfsplus/Kconfig"
+source "fs/befs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/bfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/efs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/jffs2/Kconfig"
 # UBIFS File system configuration
 source "fs/ubifs/Kconfig"
-
-config CRAMFS
-       tristate "Compressed ROM file system support (cramfs)"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       select ZLIB_INFLATE
-       help
-         Saying Y here includes support for CramFs (Compressed ROM File
-         System).  CramFs is designed to be a simple, small, and compressed
-         file system for ROM based embedded systems.  CramFs is read-only,
-         limited to 256MB file systems (with 16MB files), and doesn't support
-         16/32 bits uid/gid, hard links and timestamps.
-
-         See <file:Documentation/filesystems/cramfs.txt> and
-         <file:fs/cramfs/README> for further information.
-
-         To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
-         cramfs.  Note that the root file system (the one containing the
-         directory /) cannot be compiled as a module.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config VXFS_FS
-       tristate "FreeVxFS file system support (VERITAS VxFS(TM) compatible)"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       help
-         FreeVxFS is a file system driver that support the VERITAS VxFS(TM)
-         file system format.  VERITAS VxFS(TM) is the standard file system
-         of SCO UnixWare (and possibly others) and optionally available
-         for Sunsoft Solaris, HP-UX and many other operating systems.
-         Currently only readonly access is supported.
-
-         NOTE: the file system type as used by mount(1), mount(2) and
-         fstab(5) is 'vxfs' as it describes the file system format, not
-         the actual driver.
-
-         To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be
-         called freevxfs.  If unsure, say N.
-
-config MINIX_FS
-       tristate "Minix file system support"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       help
-         Minix is a simple operating system used in many classes about OS's.
-         The minix file system (method to organize files on a hard disk
-         partition or a floppy disk) was the original file system for Linux,
-         but has been superseded by the second extended file system ext2fs.
-         You don't want to use the minix file system on your hard disk
-         because of certain built-in restrictions, but it is sometimes found
-         on older Linux floppy disks.  This option will enlarge your kernel
-         by about 28 KB. If unsure, say N.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called minix.  Note that the file system of your root
-         partition (the one containing the directory /) cannot be compiled as
-         a module.
-
-config OMFS_FS
-       tristate "SonicBlue Optimized MPEG File System support"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       select CRC_ITU_T
-       help
-         This is the proprietary file system used by the Rio Karma music
-         player and ReplayTV DVR.  Despite the name, this filesystem is not
-         more efficient than a standard FS for MPEG files, in fact likely
-         the opposite is true.  Say Y if you have either of these devices
-         and wish to mount its disk.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called omfs.  If unsure, say N.
-
-config HPFS_FS
-       tristate "OS/2 HPFS file system support"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       help
-         OS/2 is IBM's operating system for PC's, the same as Warp, and HPFS
-         is the file system used for organizing files on OS/2 hard disk
-         partitions. Say Y if you want to be able to read files from and
-         write files to an OS/2 HPFS partition on your hard drive. OS/2
-         floppies however are in regular MSDOS format, so you don't need this
-         option in order to be able to read them. Read
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/hpfs.txt>.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called hpfs.  If unsure, say N.
-
-
-config QNX4FS_FS
-       tristate "QNX4 file system support (read only)"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       help
-         This is the file system used by the real-time operating systems
-         QNX 4 and QNX 6 (the latter is also called QNX RTP).
-         Further information is available at <http://www.qnx.com/>.
-         Say Y if you intend to mount QNX hard disks or floppies.
-         Unless you say Y to "QNX4FS read-write support" below, you will
-         only be able to read these file systems.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called qnx4.
-
-         If you don't know whether you need it, then you don't need it:
-         answer N.
-
-config QNX4FS_RW
-       bool "QNX4FS write support (DANGEROUS)"
-       depends on QNX4FS_FS && EXPERIMENTAL && BROKEN
-       help
-         Say Y if you want to test write support for QNX4 file systems.
-
-         It's currently broken, so for now:
-         answer N.
-
-config ROMFS_FS
-       tristate "ROM file system support"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       ---help---
-         This is a very small read-only file system mainly intended for
-         initial ram disks of installation disks, but it could be used for
-         other read-only media as well.  Read
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/romfs.txt> for details.
-
-         To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called romfs.  Note that the file system of your
-         root partition (the one containing the directory /) cannot be a
-         module.
-
-         If you don't know whether you need it, then you don't need it:
-         answer N.
-
-
-config SYSV_FS
-       tristate "System V/Xenix/V7/Coherent file system support"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       help
-         SCO, Xenix and Coherent are commercial Unix systems for Intel
-         machines, and Version 7 was used on the DEC PDP-11. Saying Y
-         here would allow you to read from their floppies and hard disk
-         partitions.
-
-         If you have floppies or hard disk partitions like that, it is likely
-         that they contain binaries from those other Unix systems; in order
-         to run these binaries, you will want to install linux-abi which is
-         a set of kernel modules that lets you run SCO, Xenix, Wyse,
-         UnixWare, Dell Unix and System V programs under Linux.  It is
-         available via FTP (user: ftp) from
-         <ftp://ftp.openlinux.org/pub/people/hch/linux-abi/>).
-         NOTE: that will work only for binaries from Intel-based systems;
-         PDP ones will have to wait until somebody ports Linux to -11 ;-)
-
-         If you only intend to mount files from some other Unix over the
-         network using NFS, you don't need the System V file system support
-         (but you need NFS file system support obviously).
-
-         Note that this option is generally not needed for floppies, since a
-         good portable way to transport files and directories between unixes
-         (and even other operating systems) is given by the tar program ("man
-         tar" or preferably "info tar").  Note also that this option has
-         nothing whatsoever to do with the option "System V IPC". Read about
-         the System V file system in
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/sysv-fs.txt>.
-         Saying Y here will enlarge your kernel by about 27 KB.
-
-         To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
-         sysv.
-
-         If you haven't heard about all of this before, it's safe to say N.
-
-
-config UFS_FS
-       tristate "UFS file system support (read only)"
-       depends on BLOCK
-       help
-         BSD and derivate versions of Unix (such as SunOS, FreeBSD, NetBSD,
-         OpenBSD and NeXTstep) use a file system called UFS. Some System V
-         Unixes can create and mount hard disk partitions and diskettes using
-         this file system as well. Saying Y here will allow you to read from
-         these partitions; if you also want to write to them, say Y to the
-         experimental "UFS file system write support", below. Please read the
-         file <file:Documentation/filesystems/ufs.txt> for more information.
-
-          The recently released UFS2 variant (used in FreeBSD 5.x) is
-          READ-ONLY supported.
-
-         Note that this option is generally not needed for floppies, since a
-         good portable way to transport files and directories between unixes
-         (and even other operating systems) is given by the tar program ("man
-         tar" or preferably "info tar").
-
-         When accessing NeXTstep files, you may need to convert them from the
-         NeXT character set to the Latin1 character set; use the program
-         recode ("info recode") for this purpose.
-
-         To compile the UFS file system support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called ufs.
-
-         If you haven't heard about all of this before, it's safe to say N.
-
-config UFS_FS_WRITE
-       bool "UFS file system write support (DANGEROUS)"
-       depends on UFS_FS && EXPERIMENTAL
-       help
-         Say Y here if you want to try writing to UFS partitions. This is
-         experimental, so you should back up your UFS partitions beforehand.
-
-config UFS_DEBUG
-       bool "UFS debugging"
-       depends on UFS_FS
-       help
-         If you are experiencing any problems with the UFS filesystem, say
-         Y here.  This will result in _many_ additional debugging messages to be
-         written to the system log.
-
-endmenu
+source "fs/logfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/cramfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/squashfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/freevxfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/minix/Kconfig"
+source "fs/omfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/hpfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/qnx4/Kconfig"
+source "fs/romfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/pstore/Kconfig"
+source "fs/sysv/Kconfig"
+source "fs/ufs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/exofs/Kconfig"
+
+endif # MISC_FILESYSTEMS
 
 menuconfig NETWORK_FILESYSTEMS
        bool "Network File Systems"
@@ -1571,185 +234,19 @@ menuconfig NETWORK_FILESYSTEMS
 
 if NETWORK_FILESYSTEMS
 
-config NFS_FS
-       tristate "NFS client support"
-       depends on INET
-       select LOCKD
-       select SUNRPC
-       select NFS_ACL_SUPPORT if NFS_V3_ACL
-       help
-         Choose Y here if you want to access files residing on other
-         computers using Sun's Network File System protocol.  To compile
-         this file system support as a module, choose M here: the module
-         will be called nfs.
-
-         To mount file systems exported by NFS servers, you also need to
-         install the user space mount.nfs command which can be found in
-         the Linux nfs-utils package, available from http://linux-nfs.org/.
-         Information about using the mount command is available in the
-         mount(8) man page.  More detail about the Linux NFS client
-         implementation is available via the nfs(5) man page.
-
-         Below you can choose which versions of the NFS protocol are
-         available in the kernel to mount NFS servers.  Support for NFS
-         version 2 (RFC 1094) is always available when NFS_FS is selected.
-
-         To configure a system which mounts its root file system via NFS
-         at boot time, say Y here, select "Kernel level IP
-         autoconfiguration" in the NETWORK menu, and select "Root file
-         system on NFS" below.  You cannot compile this file system as a
-         module in this case.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config NFS_V3
-       bool "NFS client support for NFS version 3"
-       depends on NFS_FS
-       help
-         This option enables support for version 3 of the NFS protocol
-         (RFC 1813) in the kernel's NFS client.
-
-         If unsure, say Y.
-
-config NFS_V3_ACL
-       bool "NFS client support for the NFSv3 ACL protocol extension"
-       depends on NFS_V3
-       help
-         Some NFS servers support an auxiliary NFSv3 ACL protocol that
-         Sun added to Solaris but never became an official part of the
-         NFS version 3 protocol.  This protocol extension allows
-         applications on NFS clients to manipulate POSIX Access Control
-         Lists on files residing on NFS servers.  NFS servers enforce
-         ACLs on local files whether this protocol is available or not.
-
-         Choose Y here if your NFS server supports the Solaris NFSv3 ACL
-         protocol extension and you want your NFS client to allow
-         applications to access and modify ACLs on files on the server.
-
-         Most NFS servers don't support the Solaris NFSv3 ACL protocol
-         extension.  You can choose N here or specify the "noacl" mount
-         option to prevent your NFS client from trying to use the NFSv3
-         ACL protocol.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config NFS_V4
-       bool "NFS client support for NFS version 4 (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on NFS_FS && EXPERIMENTAL
-       select RPCSEC_GSS_KRB5
-       help
-         This option enables support for version 4 of the NFS protocol
-         (RFC 3530) in the kernel's NFS client.
-
-         To mount NFS servers using NFSv4, you also need to install user
-         space programs which can be found in the Linux nfs-utils package,
-         available from http://linux-nfs.org/.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config ROOT_NFS
-       bool "Root file system on NFS"
-       depends on NFS_FS=y && IP_PNP
-       help
-         If you want your system to mount its root file system via NFS,
-         choose Y here.  This is common practice for managing systems
-         without local permanent storage.  For details, read
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/nfsroot.txt>.
-
-         Most people say N here.
-
-config NFSD
-       tristate "NFS server support"
-       depends on INET
-       select LOCKD
-       select SUNRPC
-       select EXPORTFS
-       select NFS_ACL_SUPPORT if NFSD_V2_ACL
-       help
-         Choose Y here if you want to allow other computers to access
-         files residing on this system using Sun's Network File System
-         protocol.  To compile the NFS server support as a module,
-         choose M here: the module will be called nfsd.
-
-         You may choose to use a user-space NFS server instead, in which
-         case you can choose N here.
-
-         To export local file systems using NFS, you also need to install
-         user space programs which can be found in the Linux nfs-utils
-         package, available from http://linux-nfs.org/.  More detail about
-         the Linux NFS server implementation is available via the
-         exports(5) man page.
-
-         Below you can choose which versions of the NFS protocol are
-         available to clients mounting the NFS server on this system.
-         Support for NFS version 2 (RFC 1094) is always available when
-         CONFIG_NFSD is selected.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config NFSD_V2_ACL
-       bool
-       depends on NFSD
-
-config NFSD_V3
-       bool "NFS server support for NFS version 3"
-       depends on NFSD
-       help
-         This option enables support in your system's NFS server for
-         version 3 of the NFS protocol (RFC 1813).
-
-         If unsure, say Y.
-
-config NFSD_V3_ACL
-       bool "NFS server support for the NFSv3 ACL protocol extension"
-       depends on NFSD_V3
-       select NFSD_V2_ACL
-       help
-         Solaris NFS servers support an auxiliary NFSv3 ACL protocol that
-         never became an official part of the NFS version 3 protocol.
-         This protocol extension allows applications on NFS clients to
-         manipulate POSIX Access Control Lists on files residing on NFS
-         servers.  NFS servers enforce POSIX ACLs on local files whether
-         this protocol is available or not.
-
-         This option enables support in your system's NFS server for the
-         NFSv3 ACL protocol extension allowing NFS clients to manipulate
-         POSIX ACLs on files exported by your system's NFS server.  NFS
-         clients which support the Solaris NFSv3 ACL protocol can then
-         access and modify ACLs on your NFS server.
-
-         To store ACLs on your NFS server, you also need to enable ACL-
-         related CONFIG options for your local file systems of choice.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config NFSD_V4
-       bool "NFS server support for NFS version 4 (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on NFSD && PROC_FS && EXPERIMENTAL
-       select NFSD_V3
-       select FS_POSIX_ACL
-       select RPCSEC_GSS_KRB5
-       help
-         This option enables support in your system's NFS server for
-         version 4 of the NFS protocol (RFC 3530).
-
-         To export files using NFSv4, you need to install additional user
-         space programs which can be found in the Linux nfs-utils package,
-         available from http://linux-nfs.org/.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
+source "fs/nfs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/nfsd/Kconfig"
 
 config LOCKD
        tristate
+       depends on FILE_LOCKING
 
 config LOCKD_V4
        bool
        depends on NFSD_V3 || NFS_V3
+       depends on FILE_LOCKING
        default y
 
-config EXPORTFS
-       tristate
-
 config NFS_ACL_SUPPORT
        tristate
        select FS_POSIX_ACL
@@ -1759,340 +256,13 @@ config NFS_COMMON
        depends on NFSD || NFS_FS
        default y
 
-config SUNRPC
-       tristate
-
-config SUNRPC_GSS
-       tristate
-
-config SUNRPC_XPRT_RDMA
-       tristate
-       depends on SUNRPC && INFINIBAND && EXPERIMENTAL
-       default SUNRPC && INFINIBAND
-       help
-         This option enables an RPC client transport capability that
-         allows the NFS client to mount servers via an RDMA-enabled
-         transport.
-
-         To compile RPC client RDMA transport support as a module,
-         choose M here: the module will be called xprtrdma.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config RPCSEC_GSS_KRB5
-       tristate "Secure RPC: Kerberos V mechanism (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on SUNRPC && EXPERIMENTAL
-       select SUNRPC_GSS
-       select CRYPTO
-       select CRYPTO_MD5
-       select CRYPTO_DES
-       select CRYPTO_CBC
-       help
-         Choose Y here to enable Secure RPC using the Kerberos version 5
-         GSS-API mechanism (RFC 1964).
-
-         Secure RPC calls with Kerberos require an auxiliary user-space
-         daemon which may be found in the Linux nfs-utils package
-         available from http://linux-nfs.org/.  In addition, user-space
-         Kerberos support should be installed.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config RPCSEC_GSS_SPKM3
-       tristate "Secure RPC: SPKM3 mechanism (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on SUNRPC && EXPERIMENTAL
-       select SUNRPC_GSS
-       select CRYPTO
-       select CRYPTO_MD5
-       select CRYPTO_DES
-       select CRYPTO_CAST5
-       select CRYPTO_CBC
-       help
-         Choose Y here to enable Secure RPC using the SPKM3 public key
-         GSS-API mechansim (RFC 2025).
-
-         Secure RPC calls with SPKM3 require an auxiliary userspace
-         daemon which may be found in the Linux nfs-utils package
-         available from http://linux-nfs.org/.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config SMB_FS
-       tristate "SMB file system support (OBSOLETE, please use CIFS)"
-       depends on INET
-       select NLS
-       help
-         SMB (Server Message Block) is the protocol Windows for Workgroups
-         (WfW), Windows 95/98, Windows NT and OS/2 Lan Manager use to share
-         files and printers over local networks.  Saying Y here allows you to
-         mount their file systems (often called "shares" in this context) and
-         access them just like any other Unix directory.  Currently, this
-         works only if the Windows machines use TCP/IP as the underlying
-         transport protocol, and not NetBEUI.  For details, read
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/smbfs.txt> and the SMB-HOWTO,
-         available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
-
-         Note: if you just want your box to act as an SMB *server* and make
-         files and printing services available to Windows clients (which need
-         to have a TCP/IP stack), you don't need to say Y here; you can use
-         the program SAMBA (available from <ftp://ftp.samba.org/pub/samba/>)
-         for that.
-
-         General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and
-         Macs is on the WWW at <http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html>.
-
-         To compile the SMB support as a module, choose M here:
-         the module will be called smbfs.  Most people say N, however.
-
-config SMB_NLS_DEFAULT
-       bool "Use a default NLS"
-       depends on SMB_FS
-       help
-         Enabling this will make smbfs use nls translations by default. You
-         need to specify the local charset (CONFIG_NLS_DEFAULT) in the nls
-         settings and you need to give the default nls for the SMB server as
-         CONFIG_SMB_NLS_REMOTE.
-
-         The nls settings can be changed at mount time, if your smbmount
-         supports that, using the codepage and iocharset parameters.
-
-         smbmount from samba 2.2.0 or later supports this.
-
-config SMB_NLS_REMOTE
-       string "Default Remote NLS Option"
-       depends on SMB_NLS_DEFAULT
-       default "cp437"
-       help
-         This setting allows you to specify a default value for which
-         codepage the server uses. If this field is left blank no
-         translations will be done by default. The local codepage/charset
-         default to CONFIG_NLS_DEFAULT.
-
-         The nls settings can be changed at mount time, if your smbmount
-         supports that, using the codepage and iocharset parameters.
-
-         smbmount from samba 2.2.0 or later supports this.
-
-config CIFS
-       tristate "CIFS support (advanced network filesystem, SMBFS successor)"
-       depends on INET
-       select NLS
-       help
-         This is the client VFS module for the Common Internet File System
-         (CIFS) protocol which is the successor to the Server Message Block 
-         (SMB) protocol, the native file sharing mechanism for most early
-         PC operating systems.  The CIFS protocol is fully supported by 
-         file servers such as Windows 2000 (including Windows 2003, NT 4  
-         and Windows XP) as well by Samba (which provides excellent CIFS
-         server support for Linux and many other operating systems). Limited
-         support for OS/2 and Windows ME and similar servers is provided as
-         well.
-
-         The cifs module provides an advanced network file system
-         client for mounting to CIFS compliant servers.  It includes
-         support for DFS (hierarchical name space), secure per-user
-         session establishment via Kerberos or NTLM or NTLMv2,
-         safe distributed caching (oplock), optional packet
-         signing, Unicode and other internationalization improvements.
-         If you need to mount to Samba or Windows from this machine, say Y.
-
-config CIFS_STATS
-        bool "CIFS statistics"
-        depends on CIFS
-        help
-          Enabling this option will cause statistics for each server share
-         mounted by the cifs client to be displayed in /proc/fs/cifs/Stats
-
-config CIFS_STATS2
-       bool "Extended statistics"
-       depends on CIFS_STATS
-       help
-         Enabling this option will allow more detailed statistics on SMB
-         request timing to be displayed in /proc/fs/cifs/DebugData and also
-         allow optional logging of slow responses to dmesg (depending on the
-         value of /proc/fs/cifs/cifsFYI, see fs/cifs/README for more details).
-         These additional statistics may have a minor effect on performance
-         and memory utilization.
-
-         Unless you are a developer or are doing network performance analysis
-         or tuning, say N.
-
-config CIFS_WEAK_PW_HASH
-       bool "Support legacy servers which use weaker LANMAN security"
-       depends on CIFS
-       help
-         Modern CIFS servers including Samba and most Windows versions
-         (since 1997) support stronger NTLM (and even NTLMv2 and Kerberos)
-         security mechanisms. These hash the password more securely
-         than the mechanisms used in the older LANMAN version of the
-         SMB protocol but LANMAN based authentication is needed to
-         establish sessions with some old SMB servers.
-
-         Enabling this option allows the cifs module to mount to older
-         LANMAN based servers such as OS/2 and Windows 95, but such
-         mounts may be less secure than mounts using NTLM or more recent
-         security mechanisms if you are on a public network.  Unless you
-         have a need to access old SMB servers (and are on a private
-         network) you probably want to say N.  Even if this support
-         is enabled in the kernel build, LANMAN authentication will not be
-         used automatically. At runtime LANMAN mounts are disabled but
-         can be set to required (or optional) either in
-         /proc/fs/cifs (see fs/cifs/README for more detail) or via an
-         option on the mount command. This support is disabled by
-         default in order to reduce the possibility of a downgrade
-         attack.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config CIFS_UPCALL
-         bool "Kerberos/SPNEGO advanced session setup"
-         depends on CIFS && KEYS
-         help
-           Enables an upcall mechanism for CIFS which accesses
-           userspace helper utilities to provide SPNEGO packaged (RFC 4178)
-           Kerberos tickets which are needed to mount to certain secure servers
-           (for which more secure Kerberos authentication is required). If
-           unsure, say N.
-
-config CIFS_XATTR
-        bool "CIFS extended attributes"
-        depends on CIFS
-        help
-          Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
-          the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
-          <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).  CIFS maps the name of
-          extended attributes beginning with the user namespace prefix
-          to SMB/CIFS EAs. EAs are stored on Windows servers without the
-          user namespace prefix, but their names are seen by Linux cifs clients
-          prefaced by the user namespace prefix. The system namespace
-          (used by some filesystems to store ACLs) is not supported at
-          this time.
-
-          If unsure, say N.
-
-config CIFS_POSIX
-        bool "CIFS POSIX Extensions"
-        depends on CIFS_XATTR
-        help
-          Enabling this option will cause the cifs client to attempt to
-         negotiate a newer dialect with servers, such as Samba 3.0.5
-         or later, that optionally can handle more POSIX like (rather
-         than Windows like) file behavior.  It also enables
-         support for POSIX ACLs (getfacl and setfacl) to servers
-         (such as Samba 3.10 and later) which can negotiate
-         CIFS POSIX ACL support.  If unsure, say N.
-
-config CIFS_DEBUG2
-       bool "Enable additional CIFS debugging routines"
-       depends on CIFS
-       help
-          Enabling this option adds a few more debugging routines
-          to the cifs code which slightly increases the size of
-          the cifs module and can cause additional logging of debug
-          messages in some error paths, slowing performance. This
-          option can be turned off unless you are debugging
-          cifs problems.  If unsure, say N.
-
-config CIFS_EXPERIMENTAL
-         bool "CIFS Experimental Features (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-         depends on CIFS && EXPERIMENTAL
-         help
-           Enables cifs features under testing. These features are
-           experimental and currently include DFS support and directory 
-           change notification ie fcntl(F_DNOTIFY), as well as the upcall
-           mechanism which will be used for Kerberos session negotiation
-           and uid remapping.  Some of these features also may depend on 
-           setting a value of 1 to the pseudo-file /proc/fs/cifs/Experimental
-           (which is disabled by default). See the file fs/cifs/README 
-           for more details.  If unsure, say N.
-
-config CIFS_DFS_UPCALL
-         bool "DFS feature support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-         depends on CIFS_EXPERIMENTAL
-         depends on KEYS
-         help
-           Enables an upcall mechanism for CIFS which contacts userspace
-           helper utilities to provide server name resolution (host names to
-           IP addresses) which is needed for implicit mounts of DFS junction
-           points. If unsure, say N.
-
-config NCP_FS
-       tristate "NCP file system support (to mount NetWare volumes)"
-       depends on IPX!=n || INET
-       help
-         NCP (NetWare Core Protocol) is a protocol that runs over IPX and is
-         used by Novell NetWare clients to talk to file servers.  It is to
-         IPX what NFS is to TCP/IP, if that helps.  Saying Y here allows you
-         to mount NetWare file server volumes and to access them just like
-         any other Unix directory.  For details, please read the file
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/ncpfs.txt> in the kernel source and
-         the IPX-HOWTO from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
-
-         You do not have to say Y here if you want your Linux box to act as a
-         file *server* for Novell NetWare clients.
-
-         General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and
-         Macs is on the WWW at <http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html>.
-
-         To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
-         ncpfs.  Say N unless you are connected to a Novell network.
-
+source "net/sunrpc/Kconfig"
+source "fs/ceph/Kconfig"
+source "fs/cifs/Kconfig"
 source "fs/ncpfs/Kconfig"
-
-config CODA_FS
-       tristate "Coda file system support (advanced network fs)"
-       depends on INET
-       help
-         Coda is an advanced network file system, similar to NFS in that it
-         enables you to mount file systems of a remote server and access them
-         with regular Unix commands as if they were sitting on your hard
-         disk.  Coda has several advantages over NFS: support for
-         disconnected operation (e.g. for laptops), read/write server
-         replication, security model for authentication and encryption,
-         persistent client caches and write back caching.
-
-         If you say Y here, your Linux box will be able to act as a Coda
-         *client*.  You will need user level code as well, both for the
-         client and server.  Servers are currently user level, i.e. they need
-         no kernel support.  Please read
-         <file:Documentation/filesystems/coda.txt> and check out the Coda
-         home page <http://www.coda.cs.cmu.edu/>.
-
-         To compile the coda client support as a module, choose M here: the
-         module will be called coda.
-
-config AFS_FS
-       tristate "Andrew File System support (AFS) (EXPERIMENTAL)"
-       depends on INET && EXPERIMENTAL
-       select AF_RXRPC
-       help
-         If you say Y here, you will get an experimental Andrew File System
-         driver. It currently only supports unsecured read-only AFS access.
-
-         See <file:Documentation/filesystems/afs.txt> for more information.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config AFS_DEBUG
-       bool "AFS dynamic debugging"
-       depends on AFS_FS
-       help
-         Say Y here to make runtime controllable debugging messages appear.
-
-         See <file:Documentation/filesystems/afs.txt> for more information.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
-
-config 9P_FS
-       tristate "Plan 9 Resource Sharing Support (9P2000) (Experimental)"
-       depends on INET && NET_9P && EXPERIMENTAL
-       help
-         If you say Y here, you will get experimental support for
-         Plan 9 resource sharing via the 9P2000 protocol.
-
-         See <http://v9fs.sf.net> for more information.
-
-         If unsure, say N.
+source "fs/coda/Kconfig"
+source "fs/afs/Kconfig"
+source "fs/9p/Kconfig"
 
 endif # NETWORK_FILESYSTEMS