Merge branch 'for_linus' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mjg59/platf...
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / nommu-mmap.txt
index 3ce8906..8e1ddec 100644 (file)
@@ -109,12 +109,44 @@ and it's also much more restricted in the latter case:
 FURTHER NOTES ON NO-MMU MMAP
 ============================
 
- (*) A request for a private mapping of less than a page in size may not return
-     a page-aligned buffer. This is because the kernel calls kmalloc() to
-     allocate the buffer, not get_free_page().
-
- (*) A list of all the mappings on the system is visible through /proc/maps in
-     no-MMU mode.
+ (*) A request for a private mapping of a file may return a buffer that is not
+     page-aligned.  This is because XIP may take place, and the data may not be
+     paged aligned in the backing store.
+
+ (*) A request for an anonymous mapping will always be page aligned.  If
+     possible the size of the request should be a power of two otherwise some
+     of the space may be wasted as the kernel must allocate a power-of-2
+     granule but will only discard the excess if appropriately configured as
+     this has an effect on fragmentation.
+
+ (*) The memory allocated by a request for an anonymous mapping will normally
+     be cleared by the kernel before being returned in accordance with the
+     Linux man pages (ver 2.22 or later).
+
+     In the MMU case this can be achieved with reasonable performance as
+     regions are backed by virtual pages, with the contents only being mapped
+     to cleared physical pages when a write happens on that specific page
+     (prior to which, the pages are effectively mapped to the global zero page
+     from which reads can take place).  This spreads out the time it takes to
+     initialize the contents of a page - depending on the write-usage of the
+     mapping.
+
+     In the no-MMU case, however, anonymous mappings are backed by physical
+     pages, and the entire map is cleared at allocation time.  This can cause
+     significant delays during a userspace malloc() as the C library does an
+     anonymous mapping and the kernel then does a memset for the entire map.
+
+     However, for memory that isn't required to be precleared - such as that
+     returned by malloc() - mmap() can take a MAP_UNINITIALIZED flag to
+     indicate to the kernel that it shouldn't bother clearing the memory before
+     returning it.  Note that CONFIG_MMAP_ALLOW_UNINITIALIZED must be enabled
+     to permit this, otherwise the flag will be ignored.
+
+     uClibc uses this to speed up malloc(), and the ELF-FDPIC binfmt uses this
+     to allocate the brk and stack region.
+
+ (*) A list of all the private copy and anonymous mappings on the system is
+     visible through /proc/maps in no-MMU mode.
 
  (*) A list of all the mappings in use by a process is visible through
      /proc/<pid>/maps in no-MMU mode.
@@ -129,6 +161,25 @@ FURTHER NOTES ON NO-MMU MMAP
      with character device files, pipes, fifos and sockets.
 
 
+==========================
+INTERPROCESS SHARED MEMORY
+==========================
+
+Both SYSV IPC SHM shared memory and POSIX shared memory is supported in NOMMU
+mode.  The former through the usual mechanism, the latter through files created
+on ramfs or tmpfs mounts.
+
+
+=======
+FUTEXES
+=======
+
+Futexes are supported in NOMMU mode if the arch supports them.  An error will
+be given if an address passed to the futex system call lies outside the
+mappings made by a process or if the mapping in which the address lies does not
+support futexes (such as an I/O chardev mapping).
+
+
 =============
 NO-MMU MREMAP
 =============
@@ -223,3 +274,18 @@ PROVIDING SHAREABLE BLOCK DEVICE SUPPORT
 Provision of shared mappings on block device files is exactly the same as for
 character devices. If there isn't a real device underneath, then the driver
 should allocate sufficient contiguous memory to honour any supported mapping.
+
+
+=================================
+ADJUSTING PAGE TRIMMING BEHAVIOUR
+=================================
+
+NOMMU mmap automatically rounds up to the nearest power-of-2 number of pages
+when performing an allocation.  This can have adverse effects on memory
+fragmentation, and as such, is left configurable.  The default behaviour is to
+aggressively trim allocations and discard any excess pages back in to the page
+allocator.  In order to retain finer-grained control over fragmentation, this
+behaviour can either be disabled completely, or bumped up to a higher page
+watermark where trimming begins.
+
+Page trimming behaviour is configurable via the sysctl `vm.nr_trim_pages'.