Documentation: add pointer to name_to_dev_t for root= values
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / memory-barriers.txt
index 650657c..f0d3a80 100644 (file)
@@ -3,6 +3,7 @@
                         ============================
 
 By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
+    Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
 
 Contents:
 
@@ -20,6 +21,7 @@ Contents:
      - SMP barrier pairing.
      - Examples of memory barrier sequences.
      - Read memory barriers vs load speculation.
+     - Transitivity
 
  (*) Explicit kernel barriers.
 
@@ -31,6 +33,7 @@ Contents:
 
      - Locking functions.
      - Interrupt disabling functions.
+     - Sleep and wake-up functions.
      - Miscellaneous functions.
 
  (*) Inter-CPU locking barrier effects.
@@ -59,6 +62,10 @@ Contents:
 
      - And then there's the Alpha.
 
+ (*) Example uses.
+
+     - Circular buffers.
+
  (*) References.
 
 
@@ -430,8 +437,8 @@ There are certain things that the Linux kernel memory barriers do not guarantee:
 
        [*] For information on bus mastering DMA and coherency please read:
 
-           Documentation/pci.txt
-           Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt
+           Documentation/PCI/pci.txt
+           Documentation/PCI/PCI-DMA-mapping.txt
            Documentation/DMA-API.txt
 
 
@@ -953,6 +960,63 @@ the speculation will be cancelled and the value reloaded:
        retrieved                               :       :       +-------+
 
 
+TRANSITIVITY
+------------
+
+Transitivity is a deeply intuitive notion about ordering that is not
+always provided by real computer systems.  The following example
+demonstrates transitivity (also called "cumulativity"):
+
+       CPU 1                   CPU 2                   CPU 3
+       ======================= ======================= =======================
+               { X = 0, Y = 0 }
+       STORE X=1               LOAD X                  STORE Y=1
+                               <general barrier>       <general barrier>
+                               LOAD Y                  LOAD X
+
+Suppose that CPU 2's load from X returns 1 and its load from Y returns 0.
+This indicates that CPU 2's load from X in some sense follows CPU 1's
+store to X and that CPU 2's load from Y in some sense preceded CPU 3's
+store to Y.  The question is then "Can CPU 3's load from X return 0?"
+
+Because CPU 2's load from X in some sense came after CPU 1's store, it
+is natural to expect that CPU 3's load from X must therefore return 1.
+This expectation is an example of transitivity: if a load executing on
+CPU A follows a load from the same variable executing on CPU B, then
+CPU A's load must either return the same value that CPU B's load did,
+or must return some later value.
+
+In the Linux kernel, use of general memory barriers guarantees
+transitivity.  Therefore, in the above example, if CPU 2's load from X
+returns 1 and its load from Y returns 0, then CPU 3's load from X must
+also return 1.
+
+However, transitivity is -not- guaranteed for read or write barriers.
+For example, suppose that CPU 2's general barrier in the above example
+is changed to a read barrier as shown below:
+
+       CPU 1                   CPU 2                   CPU 3
+       ======================= ======================= =======================
+               { X = 0, Y = 0 }
+       STORE X=1               LOAD X                  STORE Y=1
+                               <read barrier>          <general barrier>
+                               LOAD Y                  LOAD X
+
+This substitution destroys transitivity: in this example, it is perfectly
+legal for CPU 2's load from X to return 1, its load from Y to return 0,
+and CPU 3's load from X to return 0.
+
+The key point is that although CPU 2's read barrier orders its pair
+of loads, it does not guarantee to order CPU 1's store.  Therefore, if
+this example runs on a system where CPUs 1 and 2 share a store buffer
+or a level of cache, CPU 2 might have early access to CPU 1's writes.
+General barriers are therefore required to ensure that all CPUs agree
+on the combined order of CPU 1's and CPU 2's accesses.
+
+To reiterate, if your code requires transitivity, use general barriers
+throughout.
+
+
 ========================
 EXPLICIT KERNEL BARRIERS
 ========================
@@ -994,7 +1058,17 @@ The Linux kernel has eight basic CPU memory barriers:
        DATA DEPENDENCY read_barrier_depends()  smp_read_barrier_depends()
 
 
-All CPU memory barriers unconditionally imply compiler barriers.
+All memory barriers except the data dependency barriers imply a compiler
+barrier. Data dependencies do not impose any additional compiler ordering.
+
+Aside: In the case of data dependencies, the compiler would be expected to
+issue the loads in the correct order (eg. `a[b]` would have to load the value
+of b before loading a[b]), however there is no guarantee in the C specification
+that the compiler may not speculate the value of b (eg. is equal to 1) and load
+a before b (eg. tmp = a[1]; if (b != 1) tmp = a[b]; ). There is also the
+problem of a compiler reloading b after having loaded a[b], thus having a newer
+copy of b than a[b]. A consensus has not yet been reached about these problems,
+however the ACCESS_ONCE macro is a good place to start looking.
 
 SMP memory barriers are reduced to compiler barriers on uniprocessor compiled
 systems because it is assumed that a CPU will appear to be self-consistent,
@@ -1207,6 +1281,132 @@ barriers are required in such a situation, they must be provided from some
 other means.
 
 
+SLEEP AND WAKE-UP FUNCTIONS
+---------------------------
+
+Sleeping and waking on an event flagged in global data can be viewed as an
+interaction between two pieces of data: the task state of the task waiting for
+the event and the global data used to indicate the event.  To make sure that
+these appear to happen in the right order, the primitives to begin the process
+of going to sleep, and the primitives to initiate a wake up imply certain
+barriers.
+
+Firstly, the sleeper normally follows something like this sequence of events:
+
+       for (;;) {
+               set_current_state(TASK_UNINTERRUPTIBLE);
+               if (event_indicated)
+                       break;
+               schedule();
+       }
+
+A general memory barrier is interpolated automatically by set_current_state()
+after it has altered the task state:
+
+       CPU 1
+       ===============================
+       set_current_state();
+         set_mb();
+           STORE current->state
+           <general barrier>
+       LOAD event_indicated
+
+set_current_state() may be wrapped by:
+
+       prepare_to_wait();
+       prepare_to_wait_exclusive();
+
+which therefore also imply a general memory barrier after setting the state.
+The whole sequence above is available in various canned forms, all of which
+interpolate the memory barrier in the right place:
+
+       wait_event();
+       wait_event_interruptible();
+       wait_event_interruptible_exclusive();
+       wait_event_interruptible_timeout();
+       wait_event_killable();
+       wait_event_timeout();
+       wait_on_bit();
+       wait_on_bit_lock();
+
+
+Secondly, code that performs a wake up normally follows something like this:
+
+       event_indicated = 1;
+       wake_up(&event_wait_queue);
+
+or:
+
+       event_indicated = 1;
+       wake_up_process(event_daemon);
+
+A write memory barrier is implied by wake_up() and co. if and only if they wake
+something up.  The barrier occurs before the task state is cleared, and so sits
+between the STORE to indicate the event and the STORE to set TASK_RUNNING:
+
+       CPU 1                           CPU 2
+       =============================== ===============================
+       set_current_state();            STORE event_indicated
+         set_mb();                     wake_up();
+           STORE current->state          <write barrier>
+           <general barrier>             STORE current->state
+       LOAD event_indicated
+
+The available waker functions include:
+
+       complete();
+       wake_up();
+       wake_up_all();
+       wake_up_bit();
+       wake_up_interruptible();
+       wake_up_interruptible_all();
+       wake_up_interruptible_nr();
+       wake_up_interruptible_poll();
+       wake_up_interruptible_sync();
+       wake_up_interruptible_sync_poll();
+       wake_up_locked();
+       wake_up_locked_poll();
+       wake_up_nr();
+       wake_up_poll();
+       wake_up_process();
+
+
+[!] Note that the memory barriers implied by the sleeper and the waker do _not_
+order multiple stores before the wake-up with respect to loads of those stored
+values after the sleeper has called set_current_state().  For instance, if the
+sleeper does:
+
+       set_current_state(TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE);
+       if (event_indicated)
+               break;
+       __set_current_state(TASK_RUNNING);
+       do_something(my_data);
+
+and the waker does:
+
+       my_data = value;
+       event_indicated = 1;
+       wake_up(&event_wait_queue);
+
+there's no guarantee that the change to event_indicated will be perceived by
+the sleeper as coming after the change to my_data.  In such a circumstance, the
+code on both sides must interpolate its own memory barriers between the
+separate data accesses.  Thus the above sleeper ought to do:
+
+       set_current_state(TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE);
+       if (event_indicated) {
+               smp_rmb();
+               do_something(my_data);
+       }
+
+and the waker should do:
+
+       my_data = value;
+       smp_wmb();
+       event_indicated = 1;
+       wake_up(&event_wait_queue);
+
+
 MISCELLANEOUS FUNCTIONS
 -----------------------
 
@@ -1356,7 +1556,7 @@ WHERE ARE MEMORY BARRIERS NEEDED?
 
 Under normal operation, memory operation reordering is generally not going to
 be a problem as a single-threaded linear piece of code will still appear to
-work correctly, even if it's in an SMP kernel.  There are, however, three
+work correctly, even if it's in an SMP kernel.  There are, however, four
 circumstances in which reordering definitely _could_ be a problem:
 
  (*) Interprocessor interaction.
@@ -1479,7 +1679,8 @@ kernel.
 
 Any atomic operation that modifies some state in memory and returns information
 about the state (old or new) implies an SMP-conditional general memory barrier
-(smp_mb()) on each side of the actual operation.  These include:
+(smp_mb()) on each side of the actual operation (with the exception of
+explicit lock operations, described later).  These include:
 
        xchg();
        cmpxchg();
@@ -1492,7 +1693,7 @@ about the state (old or new) implies an SMP-conditional general memory barrier
        atomic_dec_and_test();
        atomic_sub_and_test();
        atomic_add_negative();
-       atomic_add_unless();
+       atomic_add_unless();    /* when succeeds (returns 1) */
        test_and_set_bit();
        test_and_clear_bit();
        test_and_change_bit();
@@ -1536,10 +1737,19 @@ If they're used for constructing a lock of some description, then they probably
 do need memory barriers as a lock primitive generally has to do things in a
 specific order.
 
-
 Basically, each usage case has to be carefully considered as to whether memory
 barriers are needed or not.
 
+The following operations are special locking primitives:
+
+       test_and_set_bit_lock();
+       clear_bit_unlock();
+       __clear_bit_unlock();
+
+These implement LOCK-class and UNLOCK-class operations. These should be used in
+preference to other operations when implementing locking primitives, because
+their implementations can be optimised on many architectures.
+
 [!] Note that special memory barrier primitives are available for these
 situations because on some CPUs the atomic instructions used imply full memory
 barriers, and so barrier instructions are superfluous in conjunction with them,
@@ -2079,6 +2289,21 @@ The Alpha defines the Linux kernel's memory barrier model.
 See the subsection on "Cache Coherency" above.
 
 
+============
+EXAMPLE USES
+============
+
+CIRCULAR BUFFERS
+----------------
+
+Memory barriers can be used to implement circular buffering without the need
+of a lock to serialise the producer with the consumer.  See:
+
+       Documentation/circular-buffers.txt
+
+for details.
+
+
 ==========
 REFERENCES
 ==========