keys: make the keyring quotas controllable through /proc/sys
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / keys.txt
index 81d9aa0..d5c7a57 100644 (file)
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
 
 This service allows cryptographic keys, authentication tokens, cross-domain
 user mappings, and similar to be cached in the kernel for the use of
-filesystems other kernel services.
+filesystems and other kernel services.
 
 Keyrings are permitted; these are a special type of key that can hold links to
 other keys. Processes each have three standard keyring subscriptions that a
@@ -170,7 +170,8 @@ The key service provides a number of features besides keys:
      amount of description and payload space that can be consumed.
 
      The user can view information on this and other statistics through procfs
-     files.
+     files.  The root user may also alter the quota limits through sysctl files
+     (see the section "New procfs files").
 
      Process-specific and thread-specific keyrings are not counted towards a
      user's quota.
@@ -329,6 +330,27 @@ about the status of the key service:
        <bytes>/<max>           Key size quota
 
 
+Four new sysctl files have been added also for the purpose of controlling the
+quota limits on keys:
+
+ (*) /proc/sys/kernel/keys/root_maxkeys
+     /proc/sys/kernel/keys/root_maxbytes
+
+     These files hold the maximum number of keys that root may have and the
+     maximum total number of bytes of data that root may have stored in those
+     keys.
+
+ (*) /proc/sys/kernel/keys/maxkeys
+     /proc/sys/kernel/keys/maxbytes
+
+     These files hold the maximum number of keys that each non-root user may
+     have and the maximum total number of bytes of data that each of those
+     users may have stored in their keys.
+
+Root may alter these by writing each new limit as a decimal number string to
+the appropriate file.
+
+
 ===============================
 USERSPACE SYSTEM CALL INTERFACE
 ===============================
@@ -711,6 +733,27 @@ The keyctl syscall functions are:
      The assumed authoritative key is inherited across fork and exec.
 
 
+ (*) Get the LSM security context attached to a key.
+
+       long keyctl(KEYCTL_GET_SECURITY, key_serial_t key, char *buffer,
+                   size_t buflen)
+
+     This function returns a string that represents the LSM security context
+     attached to a key in the buffer provided.
+
+     Unless there's an error, it always returns the amount of data it could
+     produce, even if that's too big for the buffer, but it won't copy more
+     than requested to userspace. If the buffer pointer is NULL then no copy
+     will take place.
+
+     A NUL character is included at the end of the string if the buffer is
+     sufficiently big.  This is included in the returned count.  If no LSM is
+     in force then an empty string will be returned.
+
+     A process must have view permission on the key for this function to be
+     successful.
+
+
 ===============
 KERNEL SERVICES
 ===============
@@ -726,6 +769,15 @@ call, and the key released upon close. How to deal with conflicting keys due to
 two different users opening the same file is left to the filesystem author to
 solve.
 
+To access the key manager, the following header must be #included:
+
+       <linux/key.h>
+
+Specific key types should have a header file under include/keys/ that should be
+used to access that type.  For keys of type "user", for example, that would be:
+
+       <keys/user-type.h>
+
 Note that there are two different types of pointers to keys that may be
 encountered:
 
@@ -762,7 +814,7 @@ payload contents" for more information.
 
        struct key *request_key(const struct key_type *type,
                                const char *description,
-                               const char *callout_string);
+                               const char *callout_info);
 
     This is used to request a key or keyring with a description that matches
     the description specified according to the key type's match function. This
@@ -784,11 +836,45 @@ payload contents" for more information.
 
        struct key *request_key_with_auxdata(const struct key_type *type,
                                             const char *description,
-                                            const char *callout_string,
+                                            const void *callout_info,
+                                            size_t callout_len,
                                             void *aux);
 
     This is identical to request_key(), except that the auxiliary data is
-    passed to the key_type->request_key() op if it exists.
+    passed to the key_type->request_key() op if it exists, and the callout_info
+    is a blob of length callout_len, if given (the length may be 0).
+
+
+(*) A key can be requested asynchronously by calling one of:
+
+       struct key *request_key_async(const struct key_type *type,
+                                     const char *description,
+                                     const void *callout_info,
+                                     size_t callout_len);
+
+    or:
+
+       struct key *request_key_async_with_auxdata(const struct key_type *type,
+                                                  const char *description,
+                                                  const char *callout_info,
+                                                  size_t callout_len,
+                                                  void *aux);
+
+    which are asynchronous equivalents of request_key() and
+    request_key_with_auxdata() respectively.
+
+    These two functions return with the key potentially still under
+    construction.  To wait for contruction completion, the following should be
+    called:
+
+       int wait_for_key_construction(struct key *key, bool intr);
+
+    The function will wait for the key to finish being constructed and then
+    invokes key_validate() to return an appropriate value to indicate the state
+    of the key (0 indicates the key is usable).
+
+    If intr is true, then the wait can be interrupted by a signal, in which
+    case error ERESTARTSYS will be returned.
 
 
 (*) When it is no longer required, the key should be released using:
@@ -859,9 +945,8 @@ payload contents" for more information.
        void unregister_key_type(struct key_type *type);
 
 
-Under some circumstances, it may be desirable to desirable to deal with a
-bundle of keys.  The facility provides access to the keyring type for managing
-such a bundle:
+Under some circumstances, it may be desirable to deal with a bundle of keys.
+The facility provides access to the keyring type for managing such a bundle:
 
        struct key_type key_type_keyring;
 
@@ -925,7 +1010,11 @@ DEFINING A KEY TYPE
 
 A kernel service may want to define its own key type. For instance, an AFS
 filesystem might want to define a Kerberos 5 ticket key type. To do this, it
-author fills in a struct key_type and registers it with the system.
+author fills in a key_type struct and registers it with the system.
+
+Source files that implement key types should include the following header file:
+
+       <linux/key-type.h>
 
 The structure has a number of fields, some of which are mandatory:
 
@@ -1054,22 +1143,44 @@ The structure has a number of fields, some of which are mandatory:
      as might happen when the userspace buffer is accessed.
 
 
- (*) int (*request_key)(struct key *key, struct key *authkey, const char *op,
+ (*) int (*request_key)(struct key_construction *cons, const char *op,
                        void *aux);
 
-     This method is optional.  If provided, request_key() and
-     request_key_with_auxdata() will invoke this function rather than
-     upcalling to /sbin/request-key to operate upon a key of this type.
+     This method is optional.  If provided, request_key() and friends will
+     invoke this function rather than upcalling to /sbin/request-key to operate
+     upon a key of this type.
+
+     The aux parameter is as passed to request_key_async_with_auxdata() and
+     similar or is NULL otherwise.  Also passed are the construction record for
+     the key to be operated upon and the operation type (currently only
+     "create").
+
+     This method is permitted to return before the upcall is complete, but the
+     following function must be called under all circumstances to complete the
+     instantiation process, whether or not it succeeds, whether or not there's
+     an error:
+
+       void complete_request_key(struct key_construction *cons, int error);
+
+     The error parameter should be 0 on success, -ve on error.  The
+     construction record is destroyed by this action and the authorisation key
+     will be revoked.  If an error is indicated, the key under construction
+     will be negatively instantiated if it wasn't already instantiated.
+
+     If this method returns an error, that error will be returned to the
+     caller of request_key*().  complete_request_key() must be called prior to
+     returning.
+
+     The key under construction and the authorisation key can be found in the
+     key_construction struct pointed to by cons:
+
+     (*) struct key *key;
+
+        The key under construction.
 
-     The aux parameter is as passed to request_key_with_auxdata() or is NULL
-     otherwise.  Also passed are the key to be operated upon, the
-     authorisation key for this operation and the operation type (currently
-     only "create").
+     (*) struct key *authkey;
 
-     This function should return only when the upcall is complete.  Upon return
-     the authorisation key will be revoked, and the target key will be
-     negatively instantiated if it is still uninstantiated.  The error will be
-     returned to the caller of request_key*().
+        The authorisation key.
 
 
 ============================