switch debugfs to umode_t
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / filesystems / debugfs.txt
index 742cc06..9281a95 100644 (file)
@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ described below will work.
 
 The most general way to create a file within a debugfs directory is with:
 
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_file(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_file(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                       struct dentry *parent, void *data,
                                       const struct file_operations *fops);
 
@@ -53,13 +53,13 @@ actually necessary; the debugfs code provides a number of helper functions
 for simple situations.  Files containing a single integer value can be
 created with any of:
 
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_u8(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_u8(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                     struct dentry *parent, u8 *value);
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_u16(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_u16(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                      struct dentry *parent, u16 *value);
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_u32(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_u32(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                      struct dentry *parent, u32 *value);
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_u64(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_u64(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                      struct dentry *parent, u64 *value);
 
 These files support both reading and writing the given value; if a specific
@@ -67,13 +67,13 @@ file should not be written to, simply set the mode bits accordingly.  The
 values in these files are in decimal; if hexadecimal is more appropriate,
 the following functions can be used instead:
 
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_x8(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_x8(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                     struct dentry *parent, u8 *value);
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_x16(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_x16(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                      struct dentry *parent, u16 *value);
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_x32(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_x32(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                      struct dentry *parent, u32 *value);
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_x64(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_x64(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                      struct dentry *parent, u64 *value);
 
 These functions are useful as long as the developer knows the size of the
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ value to be exported.  Some types can have different widths on different
 architectures, though, complicating the situation somewhat.  There is a
 function meant to help out in one special case:
 
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_size_t(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_size_t(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                         struct dentry *parent, 
                                         size_t *value);
 
@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ a variable of type size_t.
 
 Boolean values can be placed in debugfs with:
 
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_bool(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_bool(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                       struct dentry *parent, u32 *value);
 
 A read on the resulting file will yield either Y (for non-zero values) or
@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ Finally, a block of arbitrary binary data can be exported with:
        unsigned long size;
     };
 
-    struct dentry *debugfs_create_blob(const char *name, mode_t mode,
+    struct dentry *debugfs_create_blob(const char *name, umode_t mode,
                                       struct dentry *parent,
                                       struct debugfs_blob_wrapper *blob);