hwmon: (coretemp) Don't use threshold registers for tempX_max
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / IPMI.txt
index 83b0545..b2bea15 100644 (file)
@@ -365,6 +365,7 @@ You can change this at module load time (for a module) with:
        regshifts=<shift1>,<shift2>,...
        slave_addrs=<addr1>,<addr2>,...
        force_kipmid=<enable1>,<enable2>,...
+       kipmid_max_busy_us=<ustime1>,<ustime2>,...
        unload_when_empty=[0|1]
 
 Each of these except si_trydefaults is a list, the first item for the
@@ -433,6 +434,7 @@ kernel command line as:
        ipmi_si.regshifts=<shift1>,<shift2>,...
        ipmi_si.slave_addrs=<addr1>,<addr2>,...
        ipmi_si.force_kipmid=<enable1>,<enable2>,...
+       ipmi_si.kipmid_max_busy_us=<ustime1>,<ustime2>,...
 
 It works the same as the module parameters of the same names.
 
@@ -450,6 +452,16 @@ force this thread on or off.  If you force it off and don't have
 interrupts, the driver will run VERY slowly.  Don't blame me,
 these interfaces suck.
 
+Unfortunately, this thread can use a lot of CPU depending on the
+interface's performance.  This can waste a lot of CPU and cause
+various issues with detecting idle CPU and using extra power.  To
+avoid this, the kipmid_max_busy_us sets the maximum amount of time, in
+microseconds, that kipmid will spin before sleeping for a tick.  This
+value sets a balance between performance and CPU waste and needs to be
+tuned to your needs.  Maybe, someday, auto-tuning will be added, but
+that's not a simple thing and even the auto-tuning would need to be
+tuned to the user's desired performance.
+
 The driver supports a hot add and remove of interfaces.  This way,
 interfaces can be added or removed after the kernel is up and running.
 This is done using /sys/modules/ipmi_si/parameters/hotmod, which is a
@@ -521,6 +533,33 @@ completion during sending a panic event.
 Other Pieces
 ------------
 
+Get the detailed info related with the IPMI device
+--------------------------------------------------
+
+Some users need more detailed information about a device, like where
+the address came from or the raw base device for the IPMI interface.
+You can use the IPMI smi_watcher to catch the IPMI interfaces as they
+come or go, and to grab the information, you can use the function
+ipmi_get_smi_info(), which returns the following structure:
+
+struct ipmi_smi_info {
+       enum ipmi_addr_src addr_src;
+       struct device *dev;
+       union {
+               struct {
+                       void *acpi_handle;
+               } acpi_info;
+       } addr_info;
+};
+
+Currently special info for only for SI_ACPI address sources is
+returned.  Others may be added as necessary.
+
+Note that the dev pointer is included in the above structure, and
+assuming ipmi_smi_get_info returns success, you must call put_device
+on the dev pointer.
+
+
 Watchdog
 --------
 
@@ -584,9 +623,11 @@ The watchdog will panic and start a 120 second reset timeout if it
 gets a pre-action.  During a panic or a reboot, the watchdog will
 start a 120 timer if it is running to make sure the reboot occurs.
 
-Note that if you use the NMI preaction for the watchdog, you MUST
-NOT use nmi watchdog mode 1.  If you use the NMI watchdog, you
-must use mode 2.
+Note that if you use the NMI preaction for the watchdog, you MUST NOT
+use the nmi watchdog.  There is no reasonable way to tell if an NMI
+comes from the IPMI controller, so it must assume that if it gets an
+otherwise unhandled NMI, it must be from IPMI and it will panic
+immediately.
 
 Once you open the watchdog timer, you must write a 'V' character to the
 device to close it, or the timer will not stop.  This is a new semantic