c5f55f43909177fbbc456c8eb3dd5727337db98e
[linux-2.6.git] / tools / perf / Documentation / perf-trace-perl.txt
1 perf-trace-perl(1)
2 ==================
3
4 NAME
5 ----
6 perf-trace-perl - Process trace data with a Perl script
7
8 SYNOPSIS
9 --------
10 [verse]
11 'perf trace' [-s [lang]:script[.ext] ]
12
13 DESCRIPTION
14 -----------
15
16 This perf trace option is used to process perf trace data using perf's
17 built-in Perl interpreter.  It reads and processes the input file and
18 displays the results of the trace analysis implemented in the given
19 Perl script, if any.
20
21 STARTER SCRIPTS
22 ---------------
23
24 You can avoid reading the rest of this document by running 'perf trace
25 -g perl' in the same directory as an existing perf.data trace file.
26 That will generate a starter script containing a handler for each of
27 the event types in the trace file; it simply prints every available
28 field for each event in the trace file.
29
30 You can also look at the existing scripts in
31 ~/libexec/perf-core/scripts/perl for typical examples showing how to
32 do basic things like aggregate event data, print results, etc.  Also,
33 the check-perf-trace.pl script, while not interesting for its results,
34 attempts to exercise all of the main scripting features.
35
36 EVENT HANDLERS
37 --------------
38
39 When perf trace is invoked using a trace script, a user-defined
40 'handler function' is called for each event in the trace.  If there's
41 no handler function defined for a given event type, the event is
42 ignored (or passed to a 'trace_handled' function, see below) and the
43 next event is processed.
44
45 Most of the event's field values are passed as arguments to the
46 handler function; some of the less common ones aren't - those are
47 available as calls back into the perf executable (see below).
48
49 As an example, the following perf record command can be used to record
50 all sched_wakeup events in the system:
51
52  # perf record -c 1 -f -a -M -R -e sched:sched_wakeup
53
54 Traces meant to be processed using a script should be recorded with
55 the above options: -c 1 says to sample every event, -a to enable
56 system-wide collection, -M to multiplex the output, and -R to collect
57 raw samples.
58
59 The format file for the sched_wakep event defines the following fields
60 (see /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/events/sched/sched_wakeup/format):
61
62 ----
63  format:
64         field:unsigned short common_type;
65         field:unsigned char common_flags;
66         field:unsigned char common_preempt_count;
67         field:int common_pid;
68         field:int common_lock_depth;
69
70         field:char comm[TASK_COMM_LEN];
71         field:pid_t pid;
72         field:int prio;
73         field:int success;
74         field:int target_cpu;
75 ----
76
77 The handler function for this event would be defined as:
78
79 ----
80 sub sched::sched_wakeup
81 {
82    my ($event_name, $context, $common_cpu, $common_secs,
83        $common_nsecs, $common_pid, $common_comm,
84        $comm, $pid, $prio, $success, $target_cpu) = @_;
85 }
86 ----
87
88 The handler function takes the form subsystem::event_name.
89
90 The $common_* arguments in the handler's argument list are the set of
91 arguments passed to all event handlers; some of the fields correspond
92 to the common_* fields in the format file, but some are synthesized,
93 and some of the common_* fields aren't common enough to to be passed
94 to every event as arguments but are available as library functions.
95
96 Here's a brief description of each of the invariant event args:
97
98  $event_name                the name of the event as text
99  $context                   an opaque 'cookie' used in calls back into perf
100  $common_cpu                the cpu the event occurred on
101  $common_secs               the secs portion of the event timestamp
102  $common_nsecs              the nsecs portion of the event timestamp
103  $common_pid                the pid of the current task
104  $common_comm               the name of the current process
105
106 All of the remaining fields in the event's format file have
107 counterparts as handler function arguments of the same name, as can be
108 seen in the example above.
109
110 The above provides the basics needed to directly access every field of
111 every event in a trace, which covers 90% of what you need to know to
112 write a useful trace script.  The sections below cover the rest.
113
114 SCRIPT LAYOUT
115 -------------
116
117 Every perf trace Perl script should start by setting up a Perl module
118 search path and 'use'ing a few support modules (see module
119 descriptions below):
120
121 ----
122  use lib "$ENV{'PERF_EXEC_PATH'}/scripts/perl/Perf-Trace-Util/lib";
123  use lib "./Perf-Trace-Util/lib";
124  use Perf::Trace::Core;
125  use Perf::Trace::Context;
126  use Perf::Trace::Util;
127 ----
128
129 The rest of the script can contain handler functions and support
130 functions in any order.
131
132 Aside from the event handler functions discussed above, every script
133 can implement a set of optional functions:
134
135 *trace_begin*, if defined, is called before any event is processed and
136 gives scripts a chance to do setup tasks:
137
138 ----
139  sub trace_begin
140  {
141  }
142 ----
143
144 *trace_end*, if defined, is called after all events have been
145  processed and gives scripts a chance to do end-of-script tasks, such
146  as display results:
147
148 ----
149 sub trace_end
150 {
151 }
152 ----
153
154 *trace_unhandled*, if defined, is called after for any event that
155  doesn't have a handler explicitly defined for it.  The standard set
156  of common arguments are passed into it:
157
158 ----
159 sub trace_unhandled
160 {
161     my ($event_name, $context, $common_cpu, $common_secs,
162         $common_nsecs, $common_pid, $common_comm) = @_;
163 }
164 ----
165
166 The remaining sections provide descriptions of each of the available
167 built-in perf trace Perl modules and their associated functions.
168
169 AVAILABLE MODULES AND FUNCTIONS
170 -------------------------------
171
172 The following sections describe the functions and variables available
173 via the various Perf::Trace::* Perl modules.  To use the functions and
174 variables from the given module, add the corresponding 'use
175 Perf::Trace::XXX' line to your perf trace script.
176
177 Perf::Trace::Core Module
178 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
179
180 These functions provide some essential functions to user scripts.
181
182 The *flag_str* and *symbol_str* functions provide human-readable
183 strings for flag and symbolic fields.  These correspond to the strings
184 and values parsed from the 'print fmt' fields of the event format
185 files:
186
187   flag_str($event_name, $field_name, $field_value) - returns the string represention corresponding to $field_value for the flag field $field_name of event $event_name
188   symbol_str($event_name, $field_name, $field_value) - returns the string represention corresponding to $field_value for the symbolic field $field_name of event $event_name
189
190 Perf::Trace::Context Module
191 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
192
193 Some of the 'common' fields in the event format file aren't all that
194 common, but need to be made accessible to user scripts nonetheless.
195
196 Perf::Trace::Context defines a set of functions that can be used to
197 access this data in the context of the current event.  Each of these
198 functions expects a $context variable, which is the same as the
199 $context variable passed into every event handler as the second
200 argument.
201
202  common_pc($context) - returns common_preempt count for the current event
203  common_flags($context) - returns common_flags for the current event
204  common_lock_depth($context) - returns common_lock_depth for the current event
205
206 Perf::Trace::Util Module
207 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
208
209 Various utility functions for use with perf trace:
210
211   nsecs($secs, $nsecs) - returns total nsecs given secs/nsecs pair
212   nsecs_secs($nsecs) - returns whole secs portion given nsecs
213   nsecs_nsecs($nsecs) - returns nsecs remainder given nsecs
214   nsecs_str($nsecs) - returns printable string in the form secs.nsecs
215   avg($total, $n) - returns average given a sum and a total number of values
216
217 SEE ALSO
218 --------
219 linkperf:perf-trace[1]