usb: gadget: udc-core: add "new-style" registration interface
[linux-2.6.git] / include / linux / usb / gadget.h
1 /*
2  * <linux/usb/gadget.h>
3  *
4  * We call the USB code inside a Linux-based peripheral device a "gadget"
5  * driver, except for the hardware-specific bus glue.  One USB host can
6  * master many USB gadgets, but the gadgets are only slaved to one host.
7  *
8  *
9  * (C) Copyright 2002-2004 by David Brownell
10  * All Rights Reserved.
11  *
12  * This software is licensed under the GNU GPL version 2.
13  */
14
15 #ifndef __LINUX_USB_GADGET_H
16 #define __LINUX_USB_GADGET_H
17
18 #include <linux/device.h>
19 #include <linux/errno.h>
20 #include <linux/init.h>
21 #include <linux/list.h>
22 #include <linux/slab.h>
23 #include <linux/types.h>
24 #include <linux/usb/ch9.h>
25
26 struct usb_ep;
27
28 /**
29  * struct usb_request - describes one i/o request
30  * @buf: Buffer used for data.  Always provide this; some controllers
31  *      only use PIO, or don't use DMA for some endpoints.
32  * @dma: DMA address corresponding to 'buf'.  If you don't set this
33  *      field, and the usb controller needs one, it is responsible
34  *      for mapping and unmapping the buffer.
35  * @length: Length of that data
36  * @stream_id: The stream id, when USB3.0 bulk streams are being used
37  * @no_interrupt: If true, hints that no completion irq is needed.
38  *      Helpful sometimes with deep request queues that are handled
39  *      directly by DMA controllers.
40  * @zero: If true, when writing data, makes the last packet be "short"
41  *     by adding a zero length packet as needed;
42  * @short_not_ok: When reading data, makes short packets be
43  *     treated as errors (queue stops advancing till cleanup).
44  * @complete: Function called when request completes, so this request and
45  *      its buffer may be re-used.  The function will always be called with
46  *      interrupts disabled, and it must not sleep.
47  *      Reads terminate with a short packet, or when the buffer fills,
48  *      whichever comes first.  When writes terminate, some data bytes
49  *      will usually still be in flight (often in a hardware fifo).
50  *      Errors (for reads or writes) stop the queue from advancing
51  *      until the completion function returns, so that any transfers
52  *      invalidated by the error may first be dequeued.
53  * @context: For use by the completion callback
54  * @list: For use by the gadget driver.
55  * @status: Reports completion code, zero or a negative errno.
56  *      Normally, faults block the transfer queue from advancing until
57  *      the completion callback returns.
58  *      Code "-ESHUTDOWN" indicates completion caused by device disconnect,
59  *      or when the driver disabled the endpoint.
60  * @actual: Reports bytes transferred to/from the buffer.  For reads (OUT
61  *      transfers) this may be less than the requested length.  If the
62  *      short_not_ok flag is set, short reads are treated as errors
63  *      even when status otherwise indicates successful completion.
64  *      Note that for writes (IN transfers) some data bytes may still
65  *      reside in a device-side FIFO when the request is reported as
66  *      complete.
67  *
68  * These are allocated/freed through the endpoint they're used with.  The
69  * hardware's driver can add extra per-request data to the memory it returns,
70  * which often avoids separate memory allocations (potential failures),
71  * later when the request is queued.
72  *
73  * Request flags affect request handling, such as whether a zero length
74  * packet is written (the "zero" flag), whether a short read should be
75  * treated as an error (blocking request queue advance, the "short_not_ok"
76  * flag), or hinting that an interrupt is not required (the "no_interrupt"
77  * flag, for use with deep request queues).
78  *
79  * Bulk endpoints can use any size buffers, and can also be used for interrupt
80  * transfers. interrupt-only endpoints can be much less functional.
81  *
82  * NOTE:  this is analogous to 'struct urb' on the host side, except that
83  * it's thinner and promotes more pre-allocation.
84  */
85
86 struct usb_request {
87         void                    *buf;
88         unsigned                length;
89         dma_addr_t              dma;
90
91         unsigned                stream_id:16;
92         unsigned                no_interrupt:1;
93         unsigned                zero:1;
94         unsigned                short_not_ok:1;
95
96         void                    (*complete)(struct usb_ep *ep,
97                                         struct usb_request *req);
98         void                    *context;
99         struct list_head        list;
100
101         int                     status;
102         unsigned                actual;
103 };
104
105 /*-------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
106
107 /* endpoint-specific parts of the api to the usb controller hardware.
108  * unlike the urb model, (de)multiplexing layers are not required.
109  * (so this api could slash overhead if used on the host side...)
110  *
111  * note that device side usb controllers commonly differ in how many
112  * endpoints they support, as well as their capabilities.
113  */
114 struct usb_ep_ops {
115         int (*enable) (struct usb_ep *ep,
116                 const struct usb_endpoint_descriptor *desc);
117         int (*disable) (struct usb_ep *ep);
118
119         struct usb_request *(*alloc_request) (struct usb_ep *ep,
120                 gfp_t gfp_flags);
121         void (*free_request) (struct usb_ep *ep, struct usb_request *req);
122
123         int (*queue) (struct usb_ep *ep, struct usb_request *req,
124                 gfp_t gfp_flags);
125         int (*dequeue) (struct usb_ep *ep, struct usb_request *req);
126
127         int (*set_halt) (struct usb_ep *ep, int value);
128         int (*set_wedge) (struct usb_ep *ep);
129
130         int (*fifo_status) (struct usb_ep *ep);
131         void (*fifo_flush) (struct usb_ep *ep);
132 };
133
134 /**
135  * struct usb_ep - device side representation of USB endpoint
136  * @name:identifier for the endpoint, such as "ep-a" or "ep9in-bulk"
137  * @ops: Function pointers used to access hardware-specific operations.
138  * @ep_list:the gadget's ep_list holds all of its endpoints
139  * @maxpacket:The maximum packet size used on this endpoint.  The initial
140  *      value can sometimes be reduced (hardware allowing), according to
141  *      the endpoint descriptor used to configure the endpoint.
142  * @max_streams: The maximum number of streams supported
143  *      by this EP (0 - 16, actual number is 2^n)
144  * @mult: multiplier, 'mult' value for SS Isoc EPs
145  * @maxburst: the maximum number of bursts supported by this EP (for usb3)
146  * @driver_data:for use by the gadget driver.
147  * @address: used to identify the endpoint when finding descriptor that
148  *      matches connection speed
149  * @desc: endpoint descriptor.  This pointer is set before the endpoint is
150  *      enabled and remains valid until the endpoint is disabled.
151  * @comp_desc: In case of SuperSpeed support, this is the endpoint companion
152  *      descriptor that is used to configure the endpoint
153  *
154  * the bus controller driver lists all the general purpose endpoints in
155  * gadget->ep_list.  the control endpoint (gadget->ep0) is not in that list,
156  * and is accessed only in response to a driver setup() callback.
157  */
158 struct usb_ep {
159         void                    *driver_data;
160
161         const char              *name;
162         const struct usb_ep_ops *ops;
163         struct list_head        ep_list;
164         unsigned                maxpacket:16;
165         unsigned                max_streams:16;
166         unsigned                mult:2;
167         unsigned                maxburst:4;
168         u8                      address;
169         const struct usb_endpoint_descriptor    *desc;
170         const struct usb_ss_ep_comp_descriptor  *comp_desc;
171 };
172
173 /*-------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
174
175 /**
176  * usb_ep_enable - configure endpoint, making it usable
177  * @ep:the endpoint being configured.  may not be the endpoint named "ep0".
178  *      drivers discover endpoints through the ep_list of a usb_gadget.
179  *
180  * When configurations are set, or when interface settings change, the driver
181  * will enable or disable the relevant endpoints.  while it is enabled, an
182  * endpoint may be used for i/o until the driver receives a disconnect() from
183  * the host or until the endpoint is disabled.
184  *
185  * the ep0 implementation (which calls this routine) must ensure that the
186  * hardware capabilities of each endpoint match the descriptor provided
187  * for it.  for example, an endpoint named "ep2in-bulk" would be usable
188  * for interrupt transfers as well as bulk, but it likely couldn't be used
189  * for iso transfers or for endpoint 14.  some endpoints are fully
190  * configurable, with more generic names like "ep-a".  (remember that for
191  * USB, "in" means "towards the USB master".)
192  *
193  * returns zero, or a negative error code.
194  */
195 static inline int usb_ep_enable(struct usb_ep *ep)
196 {
197         return ep->ops->enable(ep, ep->desc);
198 }
199
200 /**
201  * usb_ep_disable - endpoint is no longer usable
202  * @ep:the endpoint being unconfigured.  may not be the endpoint named "ep0".
203  *
204  * no other task may be using this endpoint when this is called.
205  * any pending and uncompleted requests will complete with status
206  * indicating disconnect (-ESHUTDOWN) before this call returns.
207  * gadget drivers must call usb_ep_enable() again before queueing
208  * requests to the endpoint.
209  *
210  * returns zero, or a negative error code.
211  */
212 static inline int usb_ep_disable(struct usb_ep *ep)
213 {
214         return ep->ops->disable(ep);
215 }
216
217 /**
218  * usb_ep_alloc_request - allocate a request object to use with this endpoint
219  * @ep:the endpoint to be used with with the request
220  * @gfp_flags:GFP_* flags to use
221  *
222  * Request objects must be allocated with this call, since they normally
223  * need controller-specific setup and may even need endpoint-specific
224  * resources such as allocation of DMA descriptors.
225  * Requests may be submitted with usb_ep_queue(), and receive a single
226  * completion callback.  Free requests with usb_ep_free_request(), when
227  * they are no longer needed.
228  *
229  * Returns the request, or null if one could not be allocated.
230  */
231 static inline struct usb_request *usb_ep_alloc_request(struct usb_ep *ep,
232                                                        gfp_t gfp_flags)
233 {
234         return ep->ops->alloc_request(ep, gfp_flags);
235 }
236
237 /**
238  * usb_ep_free_request - frees a request object
239  * @ep:the endpoint associated with the request
240  * @req:the request being freed
241  *
242  * Reverses the effect of usb_ep_alloc_request().
243  * Caller guarantees the request is not queued, and that it will
244  * no longer be requeued (or otherwise used).
245  */
246 static inline void usb_ep_free_request(struct usb_ep *ep,
247                                        struct usb_request *req)
248 {
249         ep->ops->free_request(ep, req);
250 }
251
252 /**
253  * usb_ep_queue - queues (submits) an I/O request to an endpoint.
254  * @ep:the endpoint associated with the request
255  * @req:the request being submitted
256  * @gfp_flags: GFP_* flags to use in case the lower level driver couldn't
257  *      pre-allocate all necessary memory with the request.
258  *
259  * This tells the device controller to perform the specified request through
260  * that endpoint (reading or writing a buffer).  When the request completes,
261  * including being canceled by usb_ep_dequeue(), the request's completion
262  * routine is called to return the request to the driver.  Any endpoint
263  * (except control endpoints like ep0) may have more than one transfer
264  * request queued; they complete in FIFO order.  Once a gadget driver
265  * submits a request, that request may not be examined or modified until it
266  * is given back to that driver through the completion callback.
267  *
268  * Each request is turned into one or more packets.  The controller driver
269  * never merges adjacent requests into the same packet.  OUT transfers
270  * will sometimes use data that's already buffered in the hardware.
271  * Drivers can rely on the fact that the first byte of the request's buffer
272  * always corresponds to the first byte of some USB packet, for both
273  * IN and OUT transfers.
274  *
275  * Bulk endpoints can queue any amount of data; the transfer is packetized
276  * automatically.  The last packet will be short if the request doesn't fill it
277  * out completely.  Zero length packets (ZLPs) should be avoided in portable
278  * protocols since not all usb hardware can successfully handle zero length
279  * packets.  (ZLPs may be explicitly written, and may be implicitly written if
280  * the request 'zero' flag is set.)  Bulk endpoints may also be used
281  * for interrupt transfers; but the reverse is not true, and some endpoints
282  * won't support every interrupt transfer.  (Such as 768 byte packets.)
283  *
284  * Interrupt-only endpoints are less functional than bulk endpoints, for
285  * example by not supporting queueing or not handling buffers that are
286  * larger than the endpoint's maxpacket size.  They may also treat data
287  * toggle differently.
288  *
289  * Control endpoints ... after getting a setup() callback, the driver queues
290  * one response (even if it would be zero length).  That enables the
291  * status ack, after transferring data as specified in the response.  Setup
292  * functions may return negative error codes to generate protocol stalls.
293  * (Note that some USB device controllers disallow protocol stall responses
294  * in some cases.)  When control responses are deferred (the response is
295  * written after the setup callback returns), then usb_ep_set_halt() may be
296  * used on ep0 to trigger protocol stalls.  Depending on the controller,
297  * it may not be possible to trigger a status-stage protocol stall when the
298  * data stage is over, that is, from within the response's completion
299  * routine.
300  *
301  * For periodic endpoints, like interrupt or isochronous ones, the usb host
302  * arranges to poll once per interval, and the gadget driver usually will
303  * have queued some data to transfer at that time.
304  *
305  * Returns zero, or a negative error code.  Endpoints that are not enabled
306  * report errors; errors will also be
307  * reported when the usb peripheral is disconnected.
308  */
309 static inline int usb_ep_queue(struct usb_ep *ep,
310                                struct usb_request *req, gfp_t gfp_flags)
311 {
312         return ep->ops->queue(ep, req, gfp_flags);
313 }
314
315 /**
316  * usb_ep_dequeue - dequeues (cancels, unlinks) an I/O request from an endpoint
317  * @ep:the endpoint associated with the request
318  * @req:the request being canceled
319  *
320  * if the request is still active on the endpoint, it is dequeued and its
321  * completion routine is called (with status -ECONNRESET); else a negative
322  * error code is returned.
323  *
324  * note that some hardware can't clear out write fifos (to unlink the request
325  * at the head of the queue) except as part of disconnecting from usb.  such
326  * restrictions prevent drivers from supporting configuration changes,
327  * even to configuration zero (a "chapter 9" requirement).
328  */
329 static inline int usb_ep_dequeue(struct usb_ep *ep, struct usb_request *req)
330 {
331         return ep->ops->dequeue(ep, req);
332 }
333
334 /**
335  * usb_ep_set_halt - sets the endpoint halt feature.
336  * @ep: the non-isochronous endpoint being stalled
337  *
338  * Use this to stall an endpoint, perhaps as an error report.
339  * Except for control endpoints,
340  * the endpoint stays halted (will not stream any data) until the host
341  * clears this feature; drivers may need to empty the endpoint's request
342  * queue first, to make sure no inappropriate transfers happen.
343  *
344  * Note that while an endpoint CLEAR_FEATURE will be invisible to the
345  * gadget driver, a SET_INTERFACE will not be.  To reset endpoints for the
346  * current altsetting, see usb_ep_clear_halt().  When switching altsettings,
347  * it's simplest to use usb_ep_enable() or usb_ep_disable() for the endpoints.
348  *
349  * Returns zero, or a negative error code.  On success, this call sets
350  * underlying hardware state that blocks data transfers.
351  * Attempts to halt IN endpoints will fail (returning -EAGAIN) if any
352  * transfer requests are still queued, or if the controller hardware
353  * (usually a FIFO) still holds bytes that the host hasn't collected.
354  */
355 static inline int usb_ep_set_halt(struct usb_ep *ep)
356 {
357         return ep->ops->set_halt(ep, 1);
358 }
359
360 /**
361  * usb_ep_clear_halt - clears endpoint halt, and resets toggle
362  * @ep:the bulk or interrupt endpoint being reset
363  *
364  * Use this when responding to the standard usb "set interface" request,
365  * for endpoints that aren't reconfigured, after clearing any other state
366  * in the endpoint's i/o queue.
367  *
368  * Returns zero, or a negative error code.  On success, this call clears
369  * the underlying hardware state reflecting endpoint halt and data toggle.
370  * Note that some hardware can't support this request (like pxa2xx_udc),
371  * and accordingly can't correctly implement interface altsettings.
372  */
373 static inline int usb_ep_clear_halt(struct usb_ep *ep)
374 {
375         return ep->ops->set_halt(ep, 0);
376 }
377
378 /**
379  * usb_ep_set_wedge - sets the halt feature and ignores clear requests
380  * @ep: the endpoint being wedged
381  *
382  * Use this to stall an endpoint and ignore CLEAR_FEATURE(HALT_ENDPOINT)
383  * requests. If the gadget driver clears the halt status, it will
384  * automatically unwedge the endpoint.
385  *
386  * Returns zero on success, else negative errno.
387  */
388 static inline int
389 usb_ep_set_wedge(struct usb_ep *ep)
390 {
391         if (ep->ops->set_wedge)
392                 return ep->ops->set_wedge(ep);
393         else
394                 return ep->ops->set_halt(ep, 1);
395 }
396
397 /**
398  * usb_ep_fifo_status - returns number of bytes in fifo, or error
399  * @ep: the endpoint whose fifo status is being checked.
400  *
401  * FIFO endpoints may have "unclaimed data" in them in certain cases,
402  * such as after aborted transfers.  Hosts may not have collected all
403  * the IN data written by the gadget driver (and reported by a request
404  * completion).  The gadget driver may not have collected all the data
405  * written OUT to it by the host.  Drivers that need precise handling for
406  * fault reporting or recovery may need to use this call.
407  *
408  * This returns the number of such bytes in the fifo, or a negative
409  * errno if the endpoint doesn't use a FIFO or doesn't support such
410  * precise handling.
411  */
412 static inline int usb_ep_fifo_status(struct usb_ep *ep)
413 {
414         if (ep->ops->fifo_status)
415                 return ep->ops->fifo_status(ep);
416         else
417                 return -EOPNOTSUPP;
418 }
419
420 /**
421  * usb_ep_fifo_flush - flushes contents of a fifo
422  * @ep: the endpoint whose fifo is being flushed.
423  *
424  * This call may be used to flush the "unclaimed data" that may exist in
425  * an endpoint fifo after abnormal transaction terminations.  The call
426  * must never be used except when endpoint is not being used for any
427  * protocol translation.
428  */
429 static inline void usb_ep_fifo_flush(struct usb_ep *ep)
430 {
431         if (ep->ops->fifo_flush)
432                 ep->ops->fifo_flush(ep);
433 }
434
435
436 /*-------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
437
438 struct usb_dcd_config_params {
439         __u8  bU1devExitLat;    /* U1 Device exit Latency */
440 #define USB_DEFULT_U1_DEV_EXIT_LAT      0x01    /* Less then 1 microsec */
441         __le16 bU2DevExitLat;   /* U2 Device exit Latency */
442 #define USB_DEFULT_U2_DEV_EXIT_LAT      0x1F4   /* Less then 500 microsec */
443 };
444
445
446 struct usb_gadget;
447 struct usb_gadget_driver;
448
449 /* the rest of the api to the controller hardware: device operations,
450  * which don't involve endpoints (or i/o).
451  */
452 struct usb_gadget_ops {
453         int     (*get_frame)(struct usb_gadget *);
454         int     (*wakeup)(struct usb_gadget *);
455         int     (*set_selfpowered) (struct usb_gadget *, int is_selfpowered);
456         int     (*vbus_session) (struct usb_gadget *, int is_active);
457         int     (*vbus_draw) (struct usb_gadget *, unsigned mA);
458         int     (*pullup) (struct usb_gadget *, int is_on);
459         int     (*ioctl)(struct usb_gadget *,
460                                 unsigned code, unsigned long param);
461         void    (*get_config_params)(struct usb_dcd_config_params *);
462         int     (*udc_start)(struct usb_gadget *,
463                         struct usb_gadget_driver *);
464         int     (*udc_stop)(struct usb_gadget *,
465                         struct usb_gadget_driver *);
466
467         /* Those two are deprecated */
468         int     (*start)(struct usb_gadget_driver *,
469                         int (*bind)(struct usb_gadget *));
470         int     (*stop)(struct usb_gadget_driver *);
471 };
472
473 /**
474  * struct usb_gadget - represents a usb slave device
475  * @ops: Function pointers used to access hardware-specific operations.
476  * @ep0: Endpoint zero, used when reading or writing responses to
477  *      driver setup() requests
478  * @ep_list: List of other endpoints supported by the device.
479  * @speed: Speed of current connection to USB host.
480  * @is_dualspeed: True if the controller supports both high and full speed
481  *      operation.  If it does, the gadget driver must also support both.
482  * @is_otg: True if the USB device port uses a Mini-AB jack, so that the
483  *      gadget driver must provide a USB OTG descriptor.
484  * @is_a_peripheral: False unless is_otg, the "A" end of a USB cable
485  *      is in the Mini-AB jack, and HNP has been used to switch roles
486  *      so that the "A" device currently acts as A-Peripheral, not A-Host.
487  * @a_hnp_support: OTG device feature flag, indicating that the A-Host
488  *      supports HNP at this port.
489  * @a_alt_hnp_support: OTG device feature flag, indicating that the A-Host
490  *      only supports HNP on a different root port.
491  * @b_hnp_enable: OTG device feature flag, indicating that the A-Host
492  *      enabled HNP support.
493  * @name: Identifies the controller hardware type.  Used in diagnostics
494  *      and sometimes configuration.
495  * @dev: Driver model state for this abstract device.
496  *
497  * Gadgets have a mostly-portable "gadget driver" implementing device
498  * functions, handling all usb configurations and interfaces.  Gadget
499  * drivers talk to hardware-specific code indirectly, through ops vectors.
500  * That insulates the gadget driver from hardware details, and packages
501  * the hardware endpoints through generic i/o queues.  The "usb_gadget"
502  * and "usb_ep" interfaces provide that insulation from the hardware.
503  *
504  * Except for the driver data, all fields in this structure are
505  * read-only to the gadget driver.  That driver data is part of the
506  * "driver model" infrastructure in 2.6 (and later) kernels, and for
507  * earlier systems is grouped in a similar structure that's not known
508  * to the rest of the kernel.
509  *
510  * Values of the three OTG device feature flags are updated before the
511  * setup() call corresponding to USB_REQ_SET_CONFIGURATION, and before
512  * driver suspend() calls.  They are valid only when is_otg, and when the
513  * device is acting as a B-Peripheral (so is_a_peripheral is false).
514  */
515 struct usb_gadget {
516         /* readonly to gadget driver */
517         const struct usb_gadget_ops     *ops;
518         struct usb_ep                   *ep0;
519         struct list_head                ep_list;        /* of usb_ep */
520         enum usb_device_speed           speed;
521         unsigned                        is_dualspeed:1;
522         unsigned                        is_otg:1;
523         unsigned                        is_a_peripheral:1;
524         unsigned                        b_hnp_enable:1;
525         unsigned                        a_hnp_support:1;
526         unsigned                        a_alt_hnp_support:1;
527         const char                      *name;
528         struct device                   dev;
529 };
530
531 static inline void set_gadget_data(struct usb_gadget *gadget, void *data)
532         { dev_set_drvdata(&gadget->dev, data); }
533 static inline void *get_gadget_data(struct usb_gadget *gadget)
534         { return dev_get_drvdata(&gadget->dev); }
535 static inline struct usb_gadget *dev_to_usb_gadget(struct device *dev)
536 {
537         return container_of(dev, struct usb_gadget, dev);
538 }
539
540 /* iterates the non-control endpoints; 'tmp' is a struct usb_ep pointer */
541 #define gadget_for_each_ep(tmp, gadget) \
542         list_for_each_entry(tmp, &(gadget)->ep_list, ep_list)
543
544
545 /**
546  * gadget_is_dualspeed - return true iff the hardware handles high speed
547  * @g: controller that might support both high and full speeds
548  */
549 static inline int gadget_is_dualspeed(struct usb_gadget *g)
550 {
551 #ifdef CONFIG_USB_GADGET_DUALSPEED
552         /* runtime test would check "g->is_dualspeed" ... that might be
553          * useful to work around hardware bugs, but is mostly pointless
554          */
555         return 1;
556 #else
557         return 0;
558 #endif
559 }
560
561 /**
562  * gadget_is_superspeed() - return true if the hardware handles
563  * supperspeed
564  * @g: controller that might support supper speed
565  */
566 static inline int gadget_is_superspeed(struct usb_gadget *g)
567 {
568 #ifdef CONFIG_USB_GADGET_SUPERSPEED
569         /*
570          * runtime test would check "g->is_superspeed" ... that might be
571          * useful to work around hardware bugs, but is mostly pointless
572          */
573         return 1;
574 #else
575         return 0;
576 #endif
577 }
578
579 /**
580  * gadget_is_otg - return true iff the hardware is OTG-ready
581  * @g: controller that might have a Mini-AB connector
582  *
583  * This is a runtime test, since kernels with a USB-OTG stack sometimes
584  * run on boards which only have a Mini-B (or Mini-A) connector.
585  */
586 static inline int gadget_is_otg(struct usb_gadget *g)
587 {
588 #ifdef CONFIG_USB_OTG
589         return g->is_otg;
590 #else
591         return 0;
592 #endif
593 }
594
595 /**
596  * usb_gadget_frame_number - returns the current frame number
597  * @gadget: controller that reports the frame number
598  *
599  * Returns the usb frame number, normally eleven bits from a SOF packet,
600  * or negative errno if this device doesn't support this capability.
601  */
602 static inline int usb_gadget_frame_number(struct usb_gadget *gadget)
603 {
604         return gadget->ops->get_frame(gadget);
605 }
606
607 /**
608  * usb_gadget_wakeup - tries to wake up the host connected to this gadget
609  * @gadget: controller used to wake up the host
610  *
611  * Returns zero on success, else negative error code if the hardware
612  * doesn't support such attempts, or its support has not been enabled
613  * by the usb host.  Drivers must return device descriptors that report
614  * their ability to support this, or hosts won't enable it.
615  *
616  * This may also try to use SRP to wake the host and start enumeration,
617  * even if OTG isn't otherwise in use.  OTG devices may also start
618  * remote wakeup even when hosts don't explicitly enable it.
619  */
620 static inline int usb_gadget_wakeup(struct usb_gadget *gadget)
621 {
622         if (!gadget->ops->wakeup)
623                 return -EOPNOTSUPP;
624         return gadget->ops->wakeup(gadget);
625 }
626
627 /**
628  * usb_gadget_set_selfpowered - sets the device selfpowered feature.
629  * @gadget:the device being declared as self-powered
630  *
631  * this affects the device status reported by the hardware driver
632  * to reflect that it now has a local power supply.
633  *
634  * returns zero on success, else negative errno.
635  */
636 static inline int usb_gadget_set_selfpowered(struct usb_gadget *gadget)
637 {
638         if (!gadget->ops->set_selfpowered)
639                 return -EOPNOTSUPP;
640         return gadget->ops->set_selfpowered(gadget, 1);
641 }
642
643 /**
644  * usb_gadget_clear_selfpowered - clear the device selfpowered feature.
645  * @gadget:the device being declared as bus-powered
646  *
647  * this affects the device status reported by the hardware driver.
648  * some hardware may not support bus-powered operation, in which
649  * case this feature's value can never change.
650  *
651  * returns zero on success, else negative errno.
652  */
653 static inline int usb_gadget_clear_selfpowered(struct usb_gadget *gadget)
654 {
655         if (!gadget->ops->set_selfpowered)
656                 return -EOPNOTSUPP;
657         return gadget->ops->set_selfpowered(gadget, 0);
658 }
659
660 /**
661  * usb_gadget_vbus_connect - Notify controller that VBUS is powered
662  * @gadget:The device which now has VBUS power.
663  * Context: can sleep
664  *
665  * This call is used by a driver for an external transceiver (or GPIO)
666  * that detects a VBUS power session starting.  Common responses include
667  * resuming the controller, activating the D+ (or D-) pullup to let the
668  * host detect that a USB device is attached, and starting to draw power
669  * (8mA or possibly more, especially after SET_CONFIGURATION).
670  *
671  * Returns zero on success, else negative errno.
672  */
673 static inline int usb_gadget_vbus_connect(struct usb_gadget *gadget)
674 {
675         if (!gadget->ops->vbus_session)
676                 return -EOPNOTSUPP;
677         return gadget->ops->vbus_session(gadget, 1);
678 }
679
680 /**
681  * usb_gadget_vbus_draw - constrain controller's VBUS power usage
682  * @gadget:The device whose VBUS usage is being described
683  * @mA:How much current to draw, in milliAmperes.  This should be twice
684  *      the value listed in the configuration descriptor bMaxPower field.
685  *
686  * This call is used by gadget drivers during SET_CONFIGURATION calls,
687  * reporting how much power the device may consume.  For example, this
688  * could affect how quickly batteries are recharged.
689  *
690  * Returns zero on success, else negative errno.
691  */
692 static inline int usb_gadget_vbus_draw(struct usb_gadget *gadget, unsigned mA)
693 {
694         if (!gadget->ops->vbus_draw)
695                 return -EOPNOTSUPP;
696         return gadget->ops->vbus_draw(gadget, mA);
697 }
698
699 /**
700  * usb_gadget_vbus_disconnect - notify controller about VBUS session end
701  * @gadget:the device whose VBUS supply is being described
702  * Context: can sleep
703  *
704  * This call is used by a driver for an external transceiver (or GPIO)
705  * that detects a VBUS power session ending.  Common responses include
706  * reversing everything done in usb_gadget_vbus_connect().
707  *
708  * Returns zero on success, else negative errno.
709  */
710 static inline int usb_gadget_vbus_disconnect(struct usb_gadget *gadget)
711 {
712         if (!gadget->ops->vbus_session)
713                 return -EOPNOTSUPP;
714         return gadget->ops->vbus_session(gadget, 0);
715 }
716
717 /**
718  * usb_gadget_connect - software-controlled connect to USB host
719  * @gadget:the peripheral being connected
720  *
721  * Enables the D+ (or potentially D-) pullup.  The host will start
722  * enumerating this gadget when the pullup is active and a VBUS session
723  * is active (the link is powered).  This pullup is always enabled unless
724  * usb_gadget_disconnect() has been used to disable it.
725  *
726  * Returns zero on success, else negative errno.
727  */
728 static inline int usb_gadget_connect(struct usb_gadget *gadget)
729 {
730         if (!gadget->ops->pullup)
731                 return -EOPNOTSUPP;
732         return gadget->ops->pullup(gadget, 1);
733 }
734
735 /**
736  * usb_gadget_disconnect - software-controlled disconnect from USB host
737  * @gadget:the peripheral being disconnected
738  *
739  * Disables the D+ (or potentially D-) pullup, which the host may see
740  * as a disconnect (when a VBUS session is active).  Not all systems
741  * support software pullup controls.
742  *
743  * This routine may be used during the gadget driver bind() call to prevent
744  * the peripheral from ever being visible to the USB host, unless later
745  * usb_gadget_connect() is called.  For example, user mode components may
746  * need to be activated before the system can talk to hosts.
747  *
748  * Returns zero on success, else negative errno.
749  */
750 static inline int usb_gadget_disconnect(struct usb_gadget *gadget)
751 {
752         if (!gadget->ops->pullup)
753                 return -EOPNOTSUPP;
754         return gadget->ops->pullup(gadget, 0);
755 }
756
757
758 /*-------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
759
760 /**
761  * struct usb_gadget_driver - driver for usb 'slave' devices
762  * @function: String describing the gadget's function
763  * @speed: Highest speed the driver handles.
764  * @setup: Invoked for ep0 control requests that aren't handled by
765  *      the hardware level driver. Most calls must be handled by
766  *      the gadget driver, including descriptor and configuration
767  *      management.  The 16 bit members of the setup data are in
768  *      USB byte order. Called in_interrupt; this may not sleep.  Driver
769  *      queues a response to ep0, or returns negative to stall.
770  * @disconnect: Invoked after all transfers have been stopped,
771  *      when the host is disconnected.  May be called in_interrupt; this
772  *      may not sleep.  Some devices can't detect disconnect, so this might
773  *      not be called except as part of controller shutdown.
774  * @unbind: Invoked when the driver is unbound from a gadget,
775  *      usually from rmmod (after a disconnect is reported).
776  *      Called in a context that permits sleeping.
777  * @suspend: Invoked on USB suspend.  May be called in_interrupt.
778  * @resume: Invoked on USB resume.  May be called in_interrupt.
779  * @driver: Driver model state for this driver.
780  *
781  * Devices are disabled till a gadget driver successfully bind()s, which
782  * means the driver will handle setup() requests needed to enumerate (and
783  * meet "chapter 9" requirements) then do some useful work.
784  *
785  * If gadget->is_otg is true, the gadget driver must provide an OTG
786  * descriptor during enumeration, or else fail the bind() call.  In such
787  * cases, no USB traffic may flow until both bind() returns without
788  * having called usb_gadget_disconnect(), and the USB host stack has
789  * initialized.
790  *
791  * Drivers use hardware-specific knowledge to configure the usb hardware.
792  * endpoint addressing is only one of several hardware characteristics that
793  * are in descriptors the ep0 implementation returns from setup() calls.
794  *
795  * Except for ep0 implementation, most driver code shouldn't need change to
796  * run on top of different usb controllers.  It'll use endpoints set up by
797  * that ep0 implementation.
798  *
799  * The usb controller driver handles a few standard usb requests.  Those
800  * include set_address, and feature flags for devices, interfaces, and
801  * endpoints (the get_status, set_feature, and clear_feature requests).
802  *
803  * Accordingly, the driver's setup() callback must always implement all
804  * get_descriptor requests, returning at least a device descriptor and
805  * a configuration descriptor.  Drivers must make sure the endpoint
806  * descriptors match any hardware constraints. Some hardware also constrains
807  * other descriptors. (The pxa250 allows only configurations 1, 2, or 3).
808  *
809  * The driver's setup() callback must also implement set_configuration,
810  * and should also implement set_interface, get_configuration, and
811  * get_interface.  Setting a configuration (or interface) is where
812  * endpoints should be activated or (config 0) shut down.
813  *
814  * (Note that only the default control endpoint is supported.  Neither
815  * hosts nor devices generally support control traffic except to ep0.)
816  *
817  * Most devices will ignore USB suspend/resume operations, and so will
818  * not provide those callbacks.  However, some may need to change modes
819  * when the host is not longer directing those activities.  For example,
820  * local controls (buttons, dials, etc) may need to be re-enabled since
821  * the (remote) host can't do that any longer; or an error state might
822  * be cleared, to make the device behave identically whether or not
823  * power is maintained.
824  */
825 struct usb_gadget_driver {
826         char                    *function;
827         enum usb_device_speed   speed;
828         void                    (*unbind)(struct usb_gadget *);
829         int                     (*setup)(struct usb_gadget *,
830                                         const struct usb_ctrlrequest *);
831         void                    (*disconnect)(struct usb_gadget *);
832         void                    (*suspend)(struct usb_gadget *);
833         void                    (*resume)(struct usb_gadget *);
834
835         /* FIXME support safe rmmod */
836         struct device_driver    driver;
837 };
838
839
840
841 /*-------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
842
843 /* driver modules register and unregister, as usual.
844  * these calls must be made in a context that can sleep.
845  *
846  * these will usually be implemented directly by the hardware-dependent
847  * usb bus interface driver, which will only support a single driver.
848  */
849
850 /**
851  * usb_gadget_probe_driver - probe a gadget driver
852  * @driver: the driver being registered
853  * @bind: the driver's bind callback
854  * Context: can sleep
855  *
856  * Call this in your gadget driver's module initialization function,
857  * to tell the underlying usb controller driver about your driver.
858  * The @bind() function will be called to bind it to a gadget before this
859  * registration call returns.  It's expected that the @bind() function will
860  * be in init sections.
861  */
862 int usb_gadget_probe_driver(struct usb_gadget_driver *driver,
863                 int (*bind)(struct usb_gadget *));
864
865 /**
866  * usb_gadget_unregister_driver - unregister a gadget driver
867  * @driver:the driver being unregistered
868  * Context: can sleep
869  *
870  * Call this in your gadget driver's module cleanup function,
871  * to tell the underlying usb controller that your driver is
872  * going away.  If the controller is connected to a USB host,
873  * it will first disconnect().  The driver is also requested
874  * to unbind() and clean up any device state, before this procedure
875  * finally returns.  It's expected that the unbind() functions
876  * will in in exit sections, so may not be linked in some kernels.
877  */
878 int usb_gadget_unregister_driver(struct usb_gadget_driver *driver);
879
880 extern int usb_add_gadget_udc(struct device *parent, struct usb_gadget *gadget);
881 extern void usb_del_gadget_udc(struct usb_gadget *gadget);
882
883 /*-------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
884
885 /* utility to simplify dealing with string descriptors */
886
887 /**
888  * struct usb_string - wraps a C string and its USB id
889  * @id:the (nonzero) ID for this string
890  * @s:the string, in UTF-8 encoding
891  *
892  * If you're using usb_gadget_get_string(), use this to wrap a string
893  * together with its ID.
894  */
895 struct usb_string {
896         u8                      id;
897         const char              *s;
898 };
899
900 /**
901  * struct usb_gadget_strings - a set of USB strings in a given language
902  * @language:identifies the strings' language (0x0409 for en-us)
903  * @strings:array of strings with their ids
904  *
905  * If you're using usb_gadget_get_string(), use this to wrap all the
906  * strings for a given language.
907  */
908 struct usb_gadget_strings {
909         u16                     language;       /* 0x0409 for en-us */
910         struct usb_string       *strings;
911 };
912
913 /* put descriptor for string with that id into buf (buflen >= 256) */
914 int usb_gadget_get_string(struct usb_gadget_strings *table, int id, u8 *buf);
915
916 /*-------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
917
918 /* utility to simplify managing config descriptors */
919
920 /* write vector of descriptors into buffer */
921 int usb_descriptor_fillbuf(void *, unsigned,
922                 const struct usb_descriptor_header **);
923
924 /* build config descriptor from single descriptor vector */
925 int usb_gadget_config_buf(const struct usb_config_descriptor *config,
926         void *buf, unsigned buflen, const struct usb_descriptor_header **desc);
927
928 /* copy a NULL-terminated vector of descriptors */
929 struct usb_descriptor_header **usb_copy_descriptors(
930                 struct usb_descriptor_header **);
931
932 /**
933  * usb_free_descriptors - free descriptors returned by usb_copy_descriptors()
934  * @v: vector of descriptors
935  */
936 static inline void usb_free_descriptors(struct usb_descriptor_header **v)
937 {
938         kfree(v);
939 }
940
941 /*-------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
942
943 /* utility wrapping a simple endpoint selection policy */
944
945 extern struct usb_ep *usb_ep_autoconfig(struct usb_gadget *,
946                         struct usb_endpoint_descriptor *);
947
948
949 extern struct usb_ep *usb_ep_autoconfig_ss(struct usb_gadget *,
950                         struct usb_endpoint_descriptor *,
951                         struct usb_ss_ep_comp_descriptor *);
952
953 extern void usb_ep_autoconfig_reset(struct usb_gadget *);
954
955 #endif /* __LINUX_USB_GADGET_H */