regulator: Add support for RICOH PMIC RC5T583 regulator
[linux-2.6.git] / include / linux / ipmi.h
1 /*
2  * ipmi.h
3  *
4  * MontaVista IPMI interface
5  *
6  * Author: MontaVista Software, Inc.
7  *         Corey Minyard <minyard@mvista.com>
8  *         source@mvista.com
9  *
10  * Copyright 2002 MontaVista Software Inc.
11  *
12  *  This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
13  *  under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the
14  *  Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your
15  *  option) any later version.
16  *
17  *
18  *  THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
19  *  WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
20  *  MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.
21  *  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
22  *  INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING,
23  *  BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS
24  *  OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND
25  *  ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR
26  *  TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE
27  *  USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
28  *
29  *  You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along
30  *  with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc.,
31  *  675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
32  */
33
34 #ifndef __LINUX_IPMI_H
35 #define __LINUX_IPMI_H
36
37 #include <linux/ipmi_msgdefs.h>
38 #include <linux/compiler.h>
39
40 /*
41  * This file describes an interface to an IPMI driver.  You have to
42  * have a fairly good understanding of IPMI to use this, so go read
43  * the specs first before actually trying to do anything.
44  *
45  * With that said, this driver provides a multi-user interface to the
46  * IPMI driver, and it allows multiple IPMI physical interfaces below
47  * the driver.  The physical interfaces bind as a lower layer on the
48  * driver.  They appear as interfaces to the application using this
49  * interface.
50  *
51  * Multi-user means that multiple applications may use the driver,
52  * send commands, receive responses, etc.  The driver keeps track of
53  * commands the user sends and tracks the responses.  The responses
54  * will go back to the application that send the command.  If the
55  * response doesn't come back in time, the driver will return a
56  * timeout error response to the application.  Asynchronous events
57  * from the BMC event queue will go to all users bound to the driver.
58  * The incoming event queue in the BMC will automatically be flushed
59  * if it becomes full and it is queried once a second to see if
60  * anything is in it.  Incoming commands to the driver will get
61  * delivered as commands.
62  *
63  * This driver provides two main interfaces: one for in-kernel
64  * applications and another for userland applications.  The
65  * capabilities are basically the same for both interface, although
66  * the interfaces are somewhat different.  The stuff in the
67  * #ifdef __KERNEL__ below is the in-kernel interface.  The userland
68  * interface is defined later in the file.  */
69
70
71
72 /*
73  * This is an overlay for all the address types, so it's easy to
74  * determine the actual address type.  This is kind of like addresses
75  * work for sockets.
76  */
77 #define IPMI_MAX_ADDR_SIZE 32
78 struct ipmi_addr {
79          /* Try to take these from the "Channel Medium Type" table
80             in section 6.5 of the IPMI 1.5 manual. */
81         int   addr_type;
82         short channel;
83         char  data[IPMI_MAX_ADDR_SIZE];
84 };
85
86 /*
87  * When the address is not used, the type will be set to this value.
88  * The channel is the BMC's channel number for the channel (usually
89  * 0), or IPMC_BMC_CHANNEL if communicating directly with the BMC.
90  */
91 #define IPMI_SYSTEM_INTERFACE_ADDR_TYPE 0x0c
92 struct ipmi_system_interface_addr {
93         int           addr_type;
94         short         channel;
95         unsigned char lun;
96 };
97
98 /* An IPMB Address. */
99 #define IPMI_IPMB_ADDR_TYPE             0x01
100 /* Used for broadcast get device id as described in section 17.9 of the
101    IPMI 1.5 manual. */
102 #define IPMI_IPMB_BROADCAST_ADDR_TYPE   0x41
103 struct ipmi_ipmb_addr {
104         int           addr_type;
105         short         channel;
106         unsigned char slave_addr;
107         unsigned char lun;
108 };
109
110 /*
111  * A LAN Address.  This is an address to/from a LAN interface bridged
112  * by the BMC, not an address actually out on the LAN.
113  *
114  * A conscious decision was made here to deviate slightly from the IPMI
115  * spec.  We do not use rqSWID and rsSWID like it shows in the
116  * message.  Instead, we use remote_SWID and local_SWID.  This means
117  * that any message (a request or response) from another device will
118  * always have exactly the same address.  If you didn't do this,
119  * requests and responses from the same device would have different
120  * addresses, and that's not too cool.
121  *
122  * In this address, the remote_SWID is always the SWID the remote
123  * message came from, or the SWID we are sending the message to.
124  * local_SWID is always our SWID.  Note that having our SWID in the
125  * message is a little weird, but this is required.
126  */
127 #define IPMI_LAN_ADDR_TYPE              0x04
128 struct ipmi_lan_addr {
129         int           addr_type;
130         short         channel;
131         unsigned char privilege;
132         unsigned char session_handle;
133         unsigned char remote_SWID;
134         unsigned char local_SWID;
135         unsigned char lun;
136 };
137
138
139 /*
140  * Channel for talking directly with the BMC.  When using this
141  * channel, This is for the system interface address type only.  FIXME
142  * - is this right, or should we use -1?
143  */
144 #define IPMI_BMC_CHANNEL  0xf
145 #define IPMI_NUM_CHANNELS 0x10
146
147 /*
148  * Used to signify an "all channel" bitmask.  This is more than the
149  * actual number of channels because this is used in userland and
150  * will cover us if the number of channels is extended.
151  */
152 #define IPMI_CHAN_ALL     (~0)
153
154
155 /*
156  * A raw IPMI message without any addressing.  This covers both
157  * commands and responses.  The completion code is always the first
158  * byte of data in the response (as the spec shows the messages laid
159  * out).
160  */
161 struct ipmi_msg {
162         unsigned char  netfn;
163         unsigned char  cmd;
164         unsigned short data_len;
165         unsigned char  __user *data;
166 };
167
168 struct kernel_ipmi_msg {
169         unsigned char  netfn;
170         unsigned char  cmd;
171         unsigned short data_len;
172         unsigned char  *data;
173 };
174
175 /*
176  * Various defines that are useful for IPMI applications.
177  */
178 #define IPMI_INVALID_CMD_COMPLETION_CODE        0xC1
179 #define IPMI_TIMEOUT_COMPLETION_CODE            0xC3
180 #define IPMI_UNKNOWN_ERR_COMPLETION_CODE        0xff
181
182
183 /*
184  * Receive types for messages coming from the receive interface.  This
185  * is used for the receive in-kernel interface and in the receive
186  * IOCTL.
187  *
188  * The "IPMI_RESPONSE_RESPNOSE_TYPE" is a little strange sounding, but
189  * it allows you to get the message results when you send a response
190  * message.
191  */
192 #define IPMI_RESPONSE_RECV_TYPE         1 /* A response to a command */
193 #define IPMI_ASYNC_EVENT_RECV_TYPE      2 /* Something from the event queue */
194 #define IPMI_CMD_RECV_TYPE              3 /* A command from somewhere else */
195 #define IPMI_RESPONSE_RESPONSE_TYPE     4 /* The response for
196                                               a sent response, giving any
197                                               error status for sending the
198                                               response.  When you send a
199                                               response message, this will
200                                               be returned. */
201 #define IPMI_OEM_RECV_TYPE              5 /* The response for OEM Channels */
202
203 /* Note that async events and received commands do not have a completion
204    code as the first byte of the incoming data, unlike a response. */
205
206
207 /*
208  * Modes for ipmi_set_maint_mode() and the userland IOCTL.  The AUTO
209  * setting is the default and means it will be set on certain
210  * commands.  Hard setting it on and off will override automatic
211  * operation.
212  */
213 #define IPMI_MAINTENANCE_MODE_AUTO      0
214 #define IPMI_MAINTENANCE_MODE_OFF       1
215 #define IPMI_MAINTENANCE_MODE_ON        2
216
217 #ifdef __KERNEL__
218
219 /*
220  * The in-kernel interface.
221  */
222 #include <linux/list.h>
223 #include <linux/module.h>
224 #include <linux/device.h>
225 #include <linux/proc_fs.h>
226
227 /* Opaque type for a IPMI message user.  One of these is needed to
228    send and receive messages. */
229 typedef struct ipmi_user *ipmi_user_t;
230
231 /*
232  * Stuff coming from the receive interface comes as one of these.
233  * They are allocated, the receiver must free them with
234  * ipmi_free_recv_msg() when done with the message.  The link is not
235  * used after the message is delivered, so the upper layer may use the
236  * link to build a linked list, if it likes.
237  */
238 struct ipmi_recv_msg {
239         struct list_head link;
240
241         /* The type of message as defined in the "Receive Types"
242            defines above. */
243         int              recv_type;
244
245         ipmi_user_t      user;
246         struct ipmi_addr addr;
247         long             msgid;
248         struct kernel_ipmi_msg  msg;
249
250         /* The user_msg_data is the data supplied when a message was
251            sent, if this is a response to a sent message.  If this is
252            not a response to a sent message, then user_msg_data will
253            be NULL.  If the user above is NULL, then this will be the
254            intf. */
255         void             *user_msg_data;
256
257         /* Call this when done with the message.  It will presumably free
258            the message and do any other necessary cleanup. */
259         void (*done)(struct ipmi_recv_msg *msg);
260
261         /* Place-holder for the data, don't make any assumptions about
262            the size or existence of this, since it may change. */
263         unsigned char   msg_data[IPMI_MAX_MSG_LENGTH];
264 };
265
266 /* Allocate and free the receive message. */
267 void ipmi_free_recv_msg(struct ipmi_recv_msg *msg);
268
269 struct ipmi_user_hndl {
270         /* Routine type to call when a message needs to be routed to
271            the upper layer.  This will be called with some locks held,
272            the only IPMI routines that can be called are ipmi_request
273            and the alloc/free operations.  The handler_data is the
274            variable supplied when the receive handler was registered. */
275         void (*ipmi_recv_hndl)(struct ipmi_recv_msg *msg,
276                                void                 *user_msg_data);
277
278         /* Called when the interface detects a watchdog pre-timeout.  If
279            this is NULL, it will be ignored for the user. */
280         void (*ipmi_watchdog_pretimeout)(void *handler_data);
281 };
282
283 /* Create a new user of the IPMI layer on the given interface number. */
284 int ipmi_create_user(unsigned int          if_num,
285                      struct ipmi_user_hndl *handler,
286                      void                  *handler_data,
287                      ipmi_user_t           *user);
288
289 /* Destroy the given user of the IPMI layer.  Note that after this
290    function returns, the system is guaranteed to not call any
291    callbacks for the user.  Thus as long as you destroy all the users
292    before you unload a module, you will be safe.  And if you destroy
293    the users before you destroy the callback structures, it should be
294    safe, too. */
295 int ipmi_destroy_user(ipmi_user_t user);
296
297 /* Get the IPMI version of the BMC we are talking to. */
298 void ipmi_get_version(ipmi_user_t   user,
299                       unsigned char *major,
300                       unsigned char *minor);
301
302 /* Set and get the slave address and LUN that we will use for our
303    source messages.  Note that this affects the interface, not just
304    this user, so it will affect all users of this interface.  This is
305    so some initialization code can come in and do the OEM-specific
306    things it takes to determine your address (if not the BMC) and set
307    it for everyone else.  Note that each channel can have its own address. */
308 int ipmi_set_my_address(ipmi_user_t   user,
309                         unsigned int  channel,
310                         unsigned char address);
311 int ipmi_get_my_address(ipmi_user_t   user,
312                         unsigned int  channel,
313                         unsigned char *address);
314 int ipmi_set_my_LUN(ipmi_user_t   user,
315                     unsigned int  channel,
316                     unsigned char LUN);
317 int ipmi_get_my_LUN(ipmi_user_t   user,
318                     unsigned int  channel,
319                     unsigned char *LUN);
320
321 /*
322  * Like ipmi_request, but lets you specify the number of retries and
323  * the retry time.  The retries is the number of times the message
324  * will be resent if no reply is received.  If set to -1, the default
325  * value will be used.  The retry time is the time in milliseconds
326  * between retries.  If set to zero, the default value will be
327  * used.
328  *
329  * Don't use this unless you *really* have to.  It's primarily for the
330  * IPMI over LAN converter; since the LAN stuff does its own retries,
331  * it makes no sense to do it here.  However, this can be used if you
332  * have unusual requirements.
333  */
334 int ipmi_request_settime(ipmi_user_t      user,
335                          struct ipmi_addr *addr,
336                          long             msgid,
337                          struct kernel_ipmi_msg  *msg,
338                          void             *user_msg_data,
339                          int              priority,
340                          int              max_retries,
341                          unsigned int     retry_time_ms);
342
343 /*
344  * Like ipmi_request, but with messages supplied.  This will not
345  * allocate any memory, and the messages may be statically allocated
346  * (just make sure to do the "done" handling on them).  Note that this
347  * is primarily for the watchdog timer, since it should be able to
348  * send messages even if no memory is available.  This is subject to
349  * change as the system changes, so don't use it unless you REALLY
350  * have to.
351  */
352 int ipmi_request_supply_msgs(ipmi_user_t          user,
353                              struct ipmi_addr     *addr,
354                              long                 msgid,
355                              struct kernel_ipmi_msg *msg,
356                              void                 *user_msg_data,
357                              void                 *supplied_smi,
358                              struct ipmi_recv_msg *supplied_recv,
359                              int                  priority);
360
361 /*
362  * Poll the IPMI interface for the user.  This causes the IPMI code to
363  * do an immediate check for information from the driver and handle
364  * anything that is immediately pending.  This will not block in any
365  * way.  This is useful if you need to spin waiting for something to
366  * happen in the IPMI driver.
367  */
368 void ipmi_poll_interface(ipmi_user_t user);
369
370 /*
371  * When commands come in to the SMS, the user can register to receive
372  * them.  Only one user can be listening on a specific netfn/cmd/chan tuple
373  * at a time, you will get an EBUSY error if the command is already
374  * registered.  If a command is received that does not have a user
375  * registered, the driver will automatically return the proper
376  * error.  Channels are specified as a bitfield, use IPMI_CHAN_ALL to
377  * mean all channels.
378  */
379 int ipmi_register_for_cmd(ipmi_user_t   user,
380                           unsigned char netfn,
381                           unsigned char cmd,
382                           unsigned int  chans);
383 int ipmi_unregister_for_cmd(ipmi_user_t   user,
384                             unsigned char netfn,
385                             unsigned char cmd,
386                             unsigned int  chans);
387
388 /*
389  * Go into a mode where the driver will not autonomously attempt to do
390  * things with the interface.  It will still respond to attentions and
391  * interrupts, and it will expect that commands will complete.  It
392  * will not automatcially check for flags, events, or things of that
393  * nature.
394  *
395  * This is primarily used for firmware upgrades.  The idea is that
396  * when you go into firmware upgrade mode, you do this operation
397  * and the driver will not attempt to do anything but what you tell
398  * it or what the BMC asks for.
399  *
400  * Note that if you send a command that resets the BMC, the driver
401  * will still expect a response from that command.  So the BMC should
402  * reset itself *after* the response is sent.  Resetting before the
403  * response is just silly.
404  *
405  * If in auto maintenance mode, the driver will automatically go into
406  * maintenance mode for 30 seconds if it sees a cold reset, a warm
407  * reset, or a firmware NetFN.  This means that code that uses only
408  * firmware NetFN commands to do upgrades will work automatically
409  * without change, assuming it sends a message every 30 seconds or
410  * less.
411  *
412  * See the IPMI_MAINTENANCE_MODE_xxx defines for what the mode means.
413  */
414 int ipmi_get_maintenance_mode(ipmi_user_t user);
415 int ipmi_set_maintenance_mode(ipmi_user_t user, int mode);
416
417 /*
418  * When the user is created, it will not receive IPMI events by
419  * default.  The user must set this to TRUE to get incoming events.
420  * The first user that sets this to TRUE will receive all events that
421  * have been queued while no one was waiting for events.
422  */
423 int ipmi_set_gets_events(ipmi_user_t user, int val);
424
425 /*
426  * Called when a new SMI is registered.  This will also be called on
427  * every existing interface when a new watcher is registered with
428  * ipmi_smi_watcher_register().
429  */
430 struct ipmi_smi_watcher {
431         struct list_head link;
432
433         /* You must set the owner to the current module, if you are in
434            a module (generally just set it to "THIS_MODULE"). */
435         struct module *owner;
436
437         /* These two are called with read locks held for the interface
438            the watcher list.  So you can add and remove users from the
439            IPMI interface, send messages, etc., but you cannot add
440            or remove SMI watchers or SMI interfaces. */
441         void (*new_smi)(int if_num, struct device *dev);
442         void (*smi_gone)(int if_num);
443 };
444
445 int ipmi_smi_watcher_register(struct ipmi_smi_watcher *watcher);
446 int ipmi_smi_watcher_unregister(struct ipmi_smi_watcher *watcher);
447
448 /* The following are various helper functions for dealing with IPMI
449    addresses. */
450
451 /* Return the maximum length of an IPMI address given it's type. */
452 unsigned int ipmi_addr_length(int addr_type);
453
454 /* Validate that the given IPMI address is valid. */
455 int ipmi_validate_addr(struct ipmi_addr *addr, int len);
456
457 /*
458  * How did the IPMI driver find out about the device?
459  */
460 enum ipmi_addr_src {
461         SI_INVALID = 0, SI_HOTMOD, SI_HARDCODED, SI_SPMI, SI_ACPI, SI_SMBIOS,
462         SI_PCI, SI_DEVICETREE, SI_DEFAULT
463 };
464
465 union ipmi_smi_info_union {
466         /*
467          * the acpi_info element is defined for the SI_ACPI
468          * address type
469          */
470         struct {
471                 void *acpi_handle;
472         } acpi_info;
473 };
474
475 struct ipmi_smi_info {
476         enum ipmi_addr_src addr_src;
477
478         /*
479          * Base device for the interface.  Don't forget to put this when
480          * you are done.
481          */
482         struct device *dev;
483
484         /*
485          * The addr_info provides more detailed info for some IPMI
486          * devices, depending on the addr_src.  Currently only SI_ACPI
487          * info is provided.
488          */
489         union ipmi_smi_info_union addr_info;
490 };
491
492 /* This is to get the private info of ipmi_smi_t */
493 extern int ipmi_get_smi_info(int if_num, struct ipmi_smi_info *data);
494
495 #endif /* __KERNEL__ */
496
497
498 /*
499  * The userland interface
500  */
501
502 /*
503  * The userland interface for the IPMI driver is a standard character
504  * device, with each instance of an interface registered as a minor
505  * number under the major character device.
506  *
507  * The read and write calls do not work, to get messages in and out
508  * requires ioctl calls because of the complexity of the data.  select
509  * and poll do work, so you can wait for input using the file
510  * descriptor, you just can use read to get it.
511  *
512  * In general, you send a command down to the interface and receive
513  * responses back.  You can use the msgid value to correlate commands
514  * and responses, the driver will take care of figuring out which
515  * incoming messages are for which command and find the proper msgid
516  * value to report.  You will only receive reponses for commands you
517  * send.  Asynchronous events, however, go to all open users, so you
518  * must be ready to handle these (or ignore them if you don't care).
519  *
520  * The address type depends upon the channel type.  When talking
521  * directly to the BMC (IPMC_BMC_CHANNEL), the address is ignored
522  * (IPMI_UNUSED_ADDR_TYPE).  When talking to an IPMB channel, you must
523  * supply a valid IPMB address with the addr_type set properly.
524  *
525  * When talking to normal channels, the driver takes care of the
526  * details of formatting and sending messages on that channel.  You do
527  * not, for instance, have to format a send command, you just send
528  * whatever command you want to the channel, the driver will create
529  * the send command, automatically issue receive command and get even
530  * commands, and pass those up to the proper user.
531  */
532
533
534 /* The magic IOCTL value for this interface. */
535 #define IPMI_IOC_MAGIC 'i'
536
537
538 /* Messages sent to the interface are this format. */
539 struct ipmi_req {
540         unsigned char __user *addr; /* Address to send the message to. */
541         unsigned int  addr_len;
542
543         long    msgid; /* The sequence number for the message.  This
544                           exact value will be reported back in the
545                           response to this request if it is a command.
546                           If it is a response, this will be used as
547                           the sequence value for the response.  */
548
549         struct ipmi_msg msg;
550 };
551 /*
552  * Send a message to the interfaces.  error values are:
553  *   - EFAULT - an address supplied was invalid.
554  *   - EINVAL - The address supplied was not valid, or the command
555  *              was not allowed.
556  *   - EMSGSIZE - The message to was too large.
557  *   - ENOMEM - Buffers could not be allocated for the command.
558  */
559 #define IPMICTL_SEND_COMMAND            _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 13,        \
560                                              struct ipmi_req)
561
562 /* Messages sent to the interface with timing parameters are this
563    format. */
564 struct ipmi_req_settime {
565         struct ipmi_req req;
566
567         /* See ipmi_request_settime() above for details on these
568            values. */
569         int          retries;
570         unsigned int retry_time_ms;
571 };
572 /*
573  * Send a message to the interfaces with timing parameters.  error values
574  * are:
575  *   - EFAULT - an address supplied was invalid.
576  *   - EINVAL - The address supplied was not valid, or the command
577  *              was not allowed.
578  *   - EMSGSIZE - The message to was too large.
579  *   - ENOMEM - Buffers could not be allocated for the command.
580  */
581 #define IPMICTL_SEND_COMMAND_SETTIME    _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 21,        \
582                                              struct ipmi_req_settime)
583
584 /* Messages received from the interface are this format. */
585 struct ipmi_recv {
586         int     recv_type; /* Is this a command, response or an
587                               asyncronous event. */
588
589         unsigned char __user *addr;    /* Address the message was from is put
590                                    here.  The caller must supply the
591                                    memory. */
592         unsigned int  addr_len; /* The size of the address buffer.
593                                    The caller supplies the full buffer
594                                    length, this value is updated to
595                                    the actual message length when the
596                                    message is received. */
597
598         long    msgid; /* The sequence number specified in the request
599                           if this is a response.  If this is a command,
600                           this will be the sequence number from the
601                           command. */
602
603         struct ipmi_msg msg; /* The data field must point to a buffer.
604                                 The data_size field must be set to the
605                                 size of the message buffer.  The
606                                 caller supplies the full buffer
607                                 length, this value is updated to the
608                                 actual message length when the message
609                                 is received. */
610 };
611
612 /*
613  * Receive a message.  error values:
614  *  - EAGAIN - no messages in the queue.
615  *  - EFAULT - an address supplied was invalid.
616  *  - EINVAL - The address supplied was not valid.
617  *  - EMSGSIZE - The message to was too large to fit into the message buffer,
618  *               the message will be left in the buffer. */
619 #define IPMICTL_RECEIVE_MSG             _IOWR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 12,       \
620                                               struct ipmi_recv)
621
622 /*
623  * Like RECEIVE_MSG, but if the message won't fit in the buffer, it
624  * will truncate the contents instead of leaving the data in the
625  * buffer.
626  */
627 #define IPMICTL_RECEIVE_MSG_TRUNC       _IOWR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 11,       \
628                                               struct ipmi_recv)
629
630 /* Register to get commands from other entities on this interface. */
631 struct ipmi_cmdspec {
632         unsigned char netfn;
633         unsigned char cmd;
634 };
635
636 /*
637  * Register to receive a specific command.  error values:
638  *   - EFAULT - an address supplied was invalid.
639  *   - EBUSY - The netfn/cmd supplied was already in use.
640  *   - ENOMEM - could not allocate memory for the entry.
641  */
642 #define IPMICTL_REGISTER_FOR_CMD        _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 14,        \
643                                              struct ipmi_cmdspec)
644 /*
645  * Unregister a regsitered command.  error values:
646  *  - EFAULT - an address supplied was invalid.
647  *  - ENOENT - The netfn/cmd was not found registered for this user.
648  */
649 #define IPMICTL_UNREGISTER_FOR_CMD      _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 15,        \
650                                              struct ipmi_cmdspec)
651
652 /*
653  * Register to get commands from other entities on specific channels.
654  * This way, you can only listen on specific channels, or have messages
655  * from some channels go to one place and other channels to someplace
656  * else.  The chans field is a bitmask, (1 << channel) for each channel.
657  * It may be IPMI_CHAN_ALL for all channels.
658  */
659 struct ipmi_cmdspec_chans {
660         unsigned int netfn;
661         unsigned int cmd;
662         unsigned int chans;
663 };
664
665 /*
666  * Register to receive a specific command on specific channels.  error values:
667  *   - EFAULT - an address supplied was invalid.
668  *   - EBUSY - One of the netfn/cmd/chans supplied was already in use.
669  *   - ENOMEM - could not allocate memory for the entry.
670  */
671 #define IPMICTL_REGISTER_FOR_CMD_CHANS  _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 28,        \
672                                              struct ipmi_cmdspec_chans)
673 /*
674  * Unregister some netfn/cmd/chans.  error values:
675  *  - EFAULT - an address supplied was invalid.
676  *  - ENOENT - None of the netfn/cmd/chans were found registered for this user.
677  */
678 #define IPMICTL_UNREGISTER_FOR_CMD_CHANS _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 29,       \
679                                              struct ipmi_cmdspec_chans)
680
681 /*
682  * Set whether this interface receives events.  Note that the first
683  * user registered for events will get all pending events for the
684  * interface.  error values:
685  *  - EFAULT - an address supplied was invalid.
686  */
687 #define IPMICTL_SET_GETS_EVENTS_CMD     _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 16, int)
688
689 /*
690  * Set and get the slave address and LUN that we will use for our
691  * source messages.  Note that this affects the interface, not just
692  * this user, so it will affect all users of this interface.  This is
693  * so some initialization code can come in and do the OEM-specific
694  * things it takes to determine your address (if not the BMC) and set
695  * it for everyone else.  You should probably leave the LUN alone.
696  */
697 struct ipmi_channel_lun_address_set {
698         unsigned short channel;
699         unsigned char  value;
700 };
701 #define IPMICTL_SET_MY_CHANNEL_ADDRESS_CMD \
702         _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 24, struct ipmi_channel_lun_address_set)
703 #define IPMICTL_GET_MY_CHANNEL_ADDRESS_CMD \
704         _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 25, struct ipmi_channel_lun_address_set)
705 #define IPMICTL_SET_MY_CHANNEL_LUN_CMD \
706         _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 26, struct ipmi_channel_lun_address_set)
707 #define IPMICTL_GET_MY_CHANNEL_LUN_CMD \
708         _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 27, struct ipmi_channel_lun_address_set)
709 /* Legacy interfaces, these only set IPMB 0. */
710 #define IPMICTL_SET_MY_ADDRESS_CMD      _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 17, unsigned int)
711 #define IPMICTL_GET_MY_ADDRESS_CMD      _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 18, unsigned int)
712 #define IPMICTL_SET_MY_LUN_CMD          _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 19, unsigned int)
713 #define IPMICTL_GET_MY_LUN_CMD          _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 20, unsigned int)
714
715 /*
716  * Get/set the default timing values for an interface.  You shouldn't
717  * generally mess with these.
718  */
719 struct ipmi_timing_parms {
720         int          retries;
721         unsigned int retry_time_ms;
722 };
723 #define IPMICTL_SET_TIMING_PARMS_CMD    _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 22, \
724                                              struct ipmi_timing_parms)
725 #define IPMICTL_GET_TIMING_PARMS_CMD    _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 23, \
726                                              struct ipmi_timing_parms)
727
728 /*
729  * Set the maintenance mode.  See ipmi_set_maintenance_mode() above
730  * for a description of what this does.
731  */
732 #define IPMICTL_GET_MAINTENANCE_MODE_CMD        _IOR(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 30, int)
733 #define IPMICTL_SET_MAINTENANCE_MODE_CMD        _IOW(IPMI_IOC_MAGIC, 31, int)
734
735 #endif /* __LINUX_IPMI_H */