[PATCH] NFSD: Add server support for NFSv3 ACLs.
[linux-2.6.git] / fs / Kconfig
1 #
2 # File system configuration
3 #
4
5 menu "File systems"
6
7 config EXT2_FS
8         tristate "Second extended fs support"
9         help
10           Ext2 is a standard Linux file system for hard disks.
11
12           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
13           module will be called ext2.  Be aware however that the file system
14           of your root partition (the one containing the directory /) cannot
15           be compiled as a module, and so this could be dangerous.
16
17           If unsure, say Y.
18
19 config EXT2_FS_XATTR
20         bool "Ext2 extended attributes"
21         depends on EXT2_FS
22         help
23           Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
24           the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
25           <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
26
27           If unsure, say N.
28
29 config EXT2_FS_POSIX_ACL
30         bool "Ext2 POSIX Access Control Lists"
31         depends on EXT2_FS_XATTR
32         help
33           Posix Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
34           groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
35
36           To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the Posix ACLs for
37           Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
38
39           If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
40
41 config EXT2_FS_SECURITY
42         bool "Ext2 Security Labels"
43         depends on EXT2_FS_XATTR
44         help
45           Security labels support alternative access control models
46           implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
47           enables an extended attribute handler for file security
48           labels in the ext2 filesystem.
49
50           If you are not using a security module that requires using
51           extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
52
53 config EXT3_FS
54         tristate "Ext3 journalling file system support"
55         help
56           This is the journaling version of the Second extended file system
57           (often called ext3), the de facto standard Linux file system
58           (method to organize files on a storage device) for hard disks.
59
60           The journaling code included in this driver means you do not have
61           to run e2fsck (file system checker) on your file systems after a
62           crash.  The journal keeps track of any changes that were being made
63           at the time the system crashed, and can ensure that your file system
64           is consistent without the need for a lengthy check.
65
66           Other than adding the journal to the file system, the on-disk format
67           of ext3 is identical to ext2.  It is possible to freely switch
68           between using the ext3 driver and the ext2 driver, as long as the
69           file system has been cleanly unmounted, or e2fsck is run on the file
70           system.
71
72           To add a journal on an existing ext2 file system or change the
73           behavior of ext3 file systems, you can use the tune2fs utility ("man
74           tune2fs").  To modify attributes of files and directories on ext3
75           file systems, use chattr ("man chattr").  You need to be using
76           e2fsprogs version 1.20 or later in order to create ext3 journals
77           (available at <http://sourceforge.net/projects/e2fsprogs/>).
78
79           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
80           module will be called ext3.  Be aware however that the file system
81           of your root partition (the one containing the directory /) cannot
82           be compiled as a module, and so this may be dangerous.
83
84 config EXT3_FS_XATTR
85         bool "Ext3 extended attributes"
86         depends on EXT3_FS
87         default y
88         help
89           Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
90           the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
91           <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
92
93           If unsure, say N.
94
95           You need this for POSIX ACL support on ext3.
96
97 config EXT3_FS_POSIX_ACL
98         bool "Ext3 POSIX Access Control Lists"
99         depends on EXT3_FS_XATTR
100         help
101           Posix Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
102           groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
103
104           To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the Posix ACLs for
105           Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
106
107           If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
108
109 config EXT3_FS_SECURITY
110         bool "Ext3 Security Labels"
111         depends on EXT3_FS_XATTR
112         help
113           Security labels support alternative access control models
114           implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
115           enables an extended attribute handler for file security
116           labels in the ext3 filesystem.
117
118           If you are not using a security module that requires using
119           extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
120
121 config JBD
122 # CONFIG_JBD could be its own option (even modular), but until there are
123 # other users than ext3, we will simply make it be the same as CONFIG_EXT3_FS
124 # dep_tristate '  Journal Block Device support (JBD for ext3)' CONFIG_JBD $CONFIG_EXT3_FS
125         tristate
126         default EXT3_FS
127         help
128           This is a generic journaling layer for block devices.  It is
129           currently used by the ext3 file system, but it could also be used to
130           add journal support to other file systems or block devices such as
131           RAID or LVM.
132
133           If you are using the ext3 file system, you need to say Y here. If
134           you are not using ext3 then you will probably want to say N.
135
136           To compile this device as a module, choose M here: the module will be
137           called jbd.  If you are compiling ext3 into the kernel, you cannot
138           compile this code as a module.
139
140 config JBD_DEBUG
141         bool "JBD (ext3) debugging support"
142         depends on JBD
143         help
144           If you are using the ext3 journaled file system (or potentially any
145           other file system/device using JBD), this option allows you to
146           enable debugging output while the system is running, in order to
147           help track down any problems you are having.  By default the
148           debugging output will be turned off.
149
150           If you select Y here, then you will be able to turn on debugging
151           with "echo N > /proc/sys/fs/jbd-debug", where N is a number between
152           1 and 5, the higher the number, the more debugging output is
153           generated.  To turn debugging off again, do
154           "echo 0 > /proc/sys/fs/jbd-debug".
155
156 config FS_MBCACHE
157 # Meta block cache for Extended Attributes (ext2/ext3)
158         tristate
159         depends on EXT2_FS_XATTR || EXT3_FS_XATTR
160         default y if EXT2_FS=y || EXT3_FS=y
161         default m if EXT2_FS=m || EXT3_FS=m
162
163 config REISERFS_FS
164         tristate "Reiserfs support"
165         help
166           Stores not just filenames but the files themselves in a balanced
167           tree.  Uses journaling.
168
169           Balanced trees are more efficient than traditional file system
170           architectural foundations.
171
172           In general, ReiserFS is as fast as ext2, but is very efficient with
173           large directories and small files.  Additional patches are needed
174           for NFS and quotas, please see <http://www.namesys.com/> for links.
175
176           It is more easily extended to have features currently found in
177           database and keyword search systems than block allocation based file
178           systems are.  The next version will be so extended, and will support
179           plugins consistent with our motto ``It takes more than a license to
180           make source code open.''
181
182           Read <http://www.namesys.com/> to learn more about reiserfs.
183
184           Sponsored by Threshold Networks, Emusic.com, and Bigstorage.com.
185
186           If you like it, you can pay us to add new features to it that you
187           need, buy a support contract, or pay us to port it to another OS.
188
189 config REISERFS_CHECK
190         bool "Enable reiserfs debug mode"
191         depends on REISERFS_FS
192         help
193           If you set this to Y, then ReiserFS will perform every check it can
194           possibly imagine of its internal consistency throughout its
195           operation.  It will also go substantially slower.  More than once we
196           have forgotten that this was on, and then gone despondent over the
197           latest benchmarks.:-) Use of this option allows our team to go all
198           out in checking for consistency when debugging without fear of its
199           effect on end users.  If you are on the verge of sending in a bug
200           report, say Y and you might get a useful error message.  Almost
201           everyone should say N.
202
203 config REISERFS_PROC_INFO
204         bool "Stats in /proc/fs/reiserfs"
205         depends on REISERFS_FS
206         help
207           Create under /proc/fs/reiserfs a hierarchy of files, displaying
208           various ReiserFS statistics and internal data at the expense of
209           making your kernel or module slightly larger (+8 KB). This also
210           increases the amount of kernel memory required for each mount.
211           Almost everyone but ReiserFS developers and people fine-tuning
212           reiserfs or tracing problems should say N.
213
214 config REISERFS_FS_XATTR
215         bool "ReiserFS extended attributes"
216         depends on REISERFS_FS
217         help
218           Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
219           the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
220           <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
221
222           If unsure, say N.
223
224 config REISERFS_FS_POSIX_ACL
225         bool "ReiserFS POSIX Access Control Lists"
226         depends on REISERFS_FS_XATTR
227         help
228           Posix Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
229           groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
230
231           To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the Posix ACLs for
232           Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
233
234           If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
235
236 config REISERFS_FS_SECURITY
237         bool "ReiserFS Security Labels"
238         depends on REISERFS_FS_XATTR
239         help
240           Security labels support alternative access control models
241           implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
242           enables an extended attribute handler for file security
243           labels in the ReiserFS filesystem.
244
245           If you are not using a security module that requires using
246           extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
247
248 config JFS_FS
249         tristate "JFS filesystem support"
250         select NLS
251         help
252           This is a port of IBM's Journaled Filesystem .  More information is
253           available in the file <file:Documentation/filesystems/jfs.txt>.
254
255           If you do not intend to use the JFS filesystem, say N.
256
257 config JFS_POSIX_ACL
258         bool "JFS POSIX Access Control Lists"
259         depends on JFS_FS
260         help
261           Posix Access Control Lists (ACLs) support permissions for users and
262           groups beyond the owner/group/world scheme.
263
264           To learn more about Access Control Lists, visit the Posix ACLs for
265           Linux website <http://acl.bestbits.at/>.
266
267           If you don't know what Access Control Lists are, say N
268
269 config JFS_SECURITY
270         bool "JFS Security Labels"
271         depends on JFS_FS
272         help
273           Security labels support alternative access control models
274           implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
275           enables an extended attribute handler for file security
276           labels in the jfs filesystem.
277
278           If you are not using a security module that requires using
279           extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
280
281 config JFS_DEBUG
282         bool "JFS debugging"
283         depends on JFS_FS
284         help
285           If you are experiencing any problems with the JFS filesystem, say
286           Y here.  This will result in additional debugging messages to be
287           written to the system log.  Under normal circumstances, this
288           results in very little overhead.
289
290 config JFS_STATISTICS
291         bool "JFS statistics"
292         depends on JFS_FS
293         help
294           Enabling this option will cause statistics from the JFS file system
295           to be made available to the user in the /proc/fs/jfs/ directory.
296
297 config FS_POSIX_ACL
298 # Posix ACL utility routines (for now, only ext2/ext3/jfs/reiserfs)
299 #
300 # NOTE: you can implement Posix ACLs without these helpers (XFS does).
301 #       Never use this symbol for ifdefs.
302 #
303         bool
304         depends on EXT2_FS_POSIX_ACL || EXT3_FS_POSIX_ACL || JFS_POSIX_ACL || REISERFS_FS_POSIX_ACL || NFSD_V4
305         default y
306
307 source "fs/xfs/Kconfig"
308
309 config MINIX_FS
310         tristate "Minix fs support"
311         help
312           Minix is a simple operating system used in many classes about OS's.
313           The minix file system (method to organize files on a hard disk
314           partition or a floppy disk) was the original file system for Linux,
315           but has been superseded by the second extended file system ext2fs.
316           You don't want to use the minix file system on your hard disk
317           because of certain built-in restrictions, but it is sometimes found
318           on older Linux floppy disks.  This option will enlarge your kernel
319           by about 28 KB. If unsure, say N.
320
321           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
322           module will be called minix.  Note that the file system of your root
323           partition (the one containing the directory /) cannot be compiled as
324           a module.
325
326 config ROMFS_FS
327         tristate "ROM file system support"
328         ---help---
329           This is a very small read-only file system mainly intended for
330           initial ram disks of installation disks, but it could be used for
331           other read-only media as well.  Read
332           <file:Documentation/filesystems/romfs.txt> for details.
333
334           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
335           module will be called romfs.  Note that the file system of your
336           root partition (the one containing the directory /) cannot be a
337           module.
338
339           If you don't know whether you need it, then you don't need it:
340           answer N.
341
342 config QUOTA
343         bool "Quota support"
344         help
345           If you say Y here, you will be able to set per user limits for disk
346           usage (also called disk quotas). Currently, it works for the
347           ext2, ext3, and reiserfs file system. ext3 also supports journalled
348           quotas for which you don't need to run quotacheck(8) after an unclean
349           shutdown. You need additional software in order to use quota support
350           (you can download sources from
351           <http://www.sf.net/projects/linuxquota/>). For further details, read
352           the Quota mini-HOWTO, available from
353           <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, or the documentation provided
354           with the quota tools. Probably the quota support is only useful for
355           multi user systems. If unsure, say N.
356
357 config QFMT_V1
358         tristate "Old quota format support"
359         depends on QUOTA
360         help
361           This quota format was (is) used by kernels earlier than 2.4.22. If
362           you have quota working and you don't want to convert to new quota
363           format say Y here.
364
365 config QFMT_V2
366         tristate "Quota format v2 support"
367         depends on QUOTA
368         help
369           This quota format allows using quotas with 32-bit UIDs/GIDs. If you
370           need this functionality say Y here. Note that you will need recent
371           quota utilities (>= 3.01) for new quota format with this kernel.
372
373 config QUOTACTL
374         bool
375         depends on XFS_QUOTA || QUOTA
376         default y
377
378 config DNOTIFY
379         bool "Dnotify support" if EMBEDDED
380         default y
381         help
382           Dnotify is a directory-based per-fd file change notification system
383           that uses signals to communicate events to user-space.  There exist
384           superior alternatives, but some applications may still rely on
385           dnotify.
386
387           Because of this, if unsure, say Y.
388
389 config AUTOFS_FS
390         tristate "Kernel automounter support"
391         help
392           The automounter is a tool to automatically mount remote file systems
393           on demand. This implementation is partially kernel-based to reduce
394           overhead in the already-mounted case; this is unlike the BSD
395           automounter (amd), which is a pure user space daemon.
396
397           To use the automounter you need the user-space tools from the autofs
398           package; you can find the location in <file:Documentation/Changes>.
399           You also want to answer Y to "NFS file system support", below.
400
401           If you want to use the newer version of the automounter with more
402           features, say N here and say Y to "Kernel automounter v4 support",
403           below.
404
405           To compile this support as a module, choose M here: the module will be
406           called autofs.
407
408           If you are not a part of a fairly large, distributed network, you
409           probably do not need an automounter, and can say N here.
410
411 config AUTOFS4_FS
412         tristate "Kernel automounter version 4 support (also supports v3)"
413         help
414           The automounter is a tool to automatically mount remote file systems
415           on demand. This implementation is partially kernel-based to reduce
416           overhead in the already-mounted case; this is unlike the BSD
417           automounter (amd), which is a pure user space daemon.
418
419           To use the automounter you need the user-space tools from
420           <ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/daemons/autofs/v4/>; you also
421           want to answer Y to "NFS file system support", below.
422
423           To compile this support as a module, choose M here: the module will be
424           called autofs4.  You will need to add "alias autofs autofs4" to your
425           modules configuration file.
426
427           If you are not a part of a fairly large, distributed network or
428           don't have a laptop which needs to dynamically reconfigure to the
429           local network, you probably do not need an automounter, and can say
430           N here.
431
432 menu "CD-ROM/DVD Filesystems"
433
434 config ISO9660_FS
435         tristate "ISO 9660 CDROM file system support"
436         help
437           This is the standard file system used on CD-ROMs.  It was previously
438           known as "High Sierra File System" and is called "hsfs" on other
439           Unix systems.  The so-called Rock-Ridge extensions which allow for
440           long Unix filenames and symbolic links are also supported by this
441           driver.  If you have a CD-ROM drive and want to do more with it than
442           just listen to audio CDs and watch its LEDs, say Y (and read
443           <file:Documentation/filesystems/isofs.txt> and the CD-ROM-HOWTO,
444           available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>), thereby
445           enlarging your kernel by about 27 KB; otherwise say N.
446
447           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
448           module will be called isofs.
449
450 config JOLIET
451         bool "Microsoft Joliet CDROM extensions"
452         depends on ISO9660_FS
453         select NLS
454         help
455           Joliet is a Microsoft extension for the ISO 9660 CD-ROM file system
456           which allows for long filenames in unicode format (unicode is the
457           new 16 bit character code, successor to ASCII, which encodes the
458           characters of almost all languages of the world; see
459           <http://www.unicode.org/> for more information).  Say Y here if you
460           want to be able to read Joliet CD-ROMs under Linux.
461
462 config ZISOFS
463         bool "Transparent decompression extension"
464         depends on ISO9660_FS
465         select ZLIB_INFLATE
466         help
467           This is a Linux-specific extension to RockRidge which lets you store
468           data in compressed form on a CD-ROM and have it transparently
469           decompressed when the CD-ROM is accessed.  See
470           <http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/fs/zisofs/> for the tools
471           necessary to create such a filesystem.  Say Y here if you want to be
472           able to read such compressed CD-ROMs.
473
474 config ZISOFS_FS
475 # for fs/nls/Config.in
476         tristate
477         depends on ZISOFS
478         default ISO9660_FS
479
480 config UDF_FS
481         tristate "UDF file system support"
482         help
483           This is the new file system used on some CD-ROMs and DVDs. Say Y if
484           you intend to mount DVD discs or CDRW's written in packet mode, or
485           if written to by other UDF utilities, such as DirectCD.
486           Please read <file:Documentation/filesystems/udf.txt>.
487
488           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
489           module will be called udf.
490
491           If unsure, say N.
492
493 config UDF_NLS
494         bool
495         default y
496         depends on (UDF_FS=m && NLS) || (UDF_FS=y && NLS=y)
497
498 endmenu
499
500 menu "DOS/FAT/NT Filesystems"
501
502 config FAT_FS
503         tristate
504         select NLS
505         help
506           If you want to use one of the FAT-based file systems (the MS-DOS and
507           VFAT (Windows 95) file systems), then you must say Y or M here
508           to include FAT support. You will then be able to mount partitions or
509           diskettes with FAT-based file systems and transparently access the
510           files on them, i.e. MSDOS files will look and behave just like all
511           other Unix files.
512
513           This FAT support is not a file system in itself, it only provides
514           the foundation for the other file systems. You will have to say Y or
515           M to at least one of "MSDOS fs support" or "VFAT fs support" in
516           order to make use of it.
517
518           Another way to read and write MSDOS floppies and hard drive
519           partitions from within Linux (but not transparently) is with the
520           mtools ("man mtools") program suite. You don't need to say Y here in
521           order to do that.
522
523           If you need to move large files on floppies between a DOS and a
524           Linux box, say Y here, mount the floppy under Linux with an MSDOS
525           file system and use GNU tar's M option. GNU tar is a program
526           available for Unix and DOS ("man tar" or "info tar").
527
528           It is now also becoming possible to read and write compressed FAT
529           file systems; read <file:Documentation/filesystems/fat_cvf.txt> for
530           details.
531
532           The FAT support will enlarge your kernel by about 37 KB. If unsure,
533           say Y.
534
535           To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
536           fat.  Note that if you compile the FAT support as a module, you
537           cannot compile any of the FAT-based file systems into the kernel
538           -- they will have to be modules as well.
539
540 config MSDOS_FS
541         tristate "MSDOS fs support"
542         select FAT_FS
543         help
544           This allows you to mount MSDOS partitions of your hard drive (unless
545           they are compressed; to access compressed MSDOS partitions under
546           Linux, you can either use the DOS emulator DOSEMU, described in the
547           DOSEMU-HOWTO, available from
548           <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, or try dmsdosfs in
549           <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/filesystems/dosfs/>. If you
550           intend to use dosemu with a non-compressed MSDOS partition, say Y
551           here) and MSDOS floppies. This means that file access becomes
552           transparent, i.e. the MSDOS files look and behave just like all
553           other Unix files.
554
555           If you have Windows 95 or Windows NT installed on your MSDOS
556           partitions, you should use the VFAT file system (say Y to "VFAT fs
557           support" below), or you will not be able to see the long filenames
558           generated by Windows 95 / Windows NT.
559
560           This option will enlarge your kernel by about 7 KB. If unsure,
561           answer Y. This will only work if you said Y to "DOS FAT fs support"
562           as well. To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will
563           be called msdos.
564
565 config VFAT_FS
566         tristate "VFAT (Windows-95) fs support"
567         select FAT_FS
568         help
569           This option provides support for normal Windows file systems with
570           long filenames.  That includes non-compressed FAT-based file systems
571           used by Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT 4.0, and the Unix
572           programs from the mtools package.
573
574           The VFAT support enlarges your kernel by about 10 KB and it only
575           works if you said Y to the "DOS FAT fs support" above.  Please read
576           the file <file:Documentation/filesystems/vfat.txt> for details.  If
577           unsure, say Y.
578
579           To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
580           vfat.
581
582 config FAT_DEFAULT_CODEPAGE
583         int "Default codepage for FAT"
584         depends on MSDOS_FS || VFAT_FS
585         default 437
586         help
587           This option should be set to the codepage of your FAT filesystems.
588           It can be overridden with the "codepage" mount option.
589           See <file:Documentation/filesystems/vfat.txt> for more information.
590
591 config FAT_DEFAULT_IOCHARSET
592         string "Default iocharset for FAT"
593         depends on VFAT_FS
594         default "iso8859-1"
595         help
596           Set this to the default input/output character set you'd
597           like FAT to use. It should probably match the character set
598           that most of your FAT filesystems use, and can be overridden
599           with the "iocharset" mount option for FAT filesystems.
600           Note that "utf8" is not recommended for FAT filesystems.
601           If unsure, you shouldn't set "utf8" here.
602           See <file:Documentation/filesystems/vfat.txt> for more information.
603
604 config NTFS_FS
605         tristate "NTFS file system support"
606         select NLS
607         help
608           NTFS is the file system of Microsoft Windows NT, 2000, XP and 2003.
609
610           Saying Y or M here enables read support.  There is partial, but
611           safe, write support available.  For write support you must also
612           say Y to "NTFS write support" below.
613
614           There are also a number of user-space tools available, called
615           ntfsprogs.  These include ntfsundelete and ntfsresize, that work
616           without NTFS support enabled in the kernel.
617
618           This is a rewrite from scratch of Linux NTFS support and replaced
619           the old NTFS code starting with Linux 2.5.11.  A backport to
620           the Linux 2.4 kernel series is separately available as a patch
621           from the project web site.
622
623           For more information see <file:Documentation/filesystems/ntfs.txt>
624           and <http://linux-ntfs.sourceforge.net/>.
625
626           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
627           module will be called ntfs.
628
629           If you are not using Windows NT, 2000, XP or 2003 in addition to
630           Linux on your computer it is safe to say N.
631
632 config NTFS_DEBUG
633         bool "NTFS debugging support"
634         depends on NTFS_FS
635         help
636           If you are experiencing any problems with the NTFS file system, say
637           Y here.  This will result in additional consistency checks to be
638           performed by the driver as well as additional debugging messages to
639           be written to the system log.  Note that debugging messages are
640           disabled by default.  To enable them, supply the option debug_msgs=1
641           at the kernel command line when booting the kernel or as an option
642           to insmod when loading the ntfs module.  Once the driver is active,
643           you can enable debugging messages by doing (as root):
644           echo 1 > /proc/sys/fs/ntfs-debug
645           Replacing the "1" with "0" would disable debug messages.
646
647           If you leave debugging messages disabled, this results in little
648           overhead, but enabling debug messages results in very significant
649           slowdown of the system.
650
651           When reporting bugs, please try to have available a full dump of
652           debugging messages while the misbehaviour was occurring.
653
654 config NTFS_RW
655         bool "NTFS write support"
656         depends on NTFS_FS
657         help
658           This enables the partial, but safe, write support in the NTFS driver.
659
660           The only supported operation is overwriting existing files, without
661           changing the file length.  No file or directory creation, deletion or
662           renaming is possible.  Note only non-resident files can be written to
663           so you may find that some very small files (<500 bytes or so) cannot
664           be written to.
665
666           While we cannot guarantee that it will not damage any data, we have
667           so far not received a single report where the driver would have
668           damaged someones data so we assume it is perfectly safe to use.
669
670           Note:  While write support is safe in this version (a rewrite from
671           scratch of the NTFS support), it should be noted that the old NTFS
672           write support, included in Linux 2.5.10 and before (since 1997),
673           is not safe.
674
675           This is currently useful with TopologiLinux.  TopologiLinux is run
676           on top of any DOS/Microsoft Windows system without partitioning your
677           hard disk.  Unlike other Linux distributions TopologiLinux does not
678           need its own partition.  For more information see
679           <http://topologi-linux.sourceforge.net/>
680
681           It is perfectly safe to say N here.
682
683 endmenu
684
685 menu "Pseudo filesystems"
686
687 config PROC_FS
688         bool "/proc file system support"
689         help
690           This is a virtual file system providing information about the status
691           of the system. "Virtual" means that it doesn't take up any space on
692           your hard disk: the files are created on the fly by the kernel when
693           you try to access them. Also, you cannot read the files with older
694           version of the program less: you need to use more or cat.
695
696           It's totally cool; for example, "cat /proc/interrupts" gives
697           information about what the different IRQs are used for at the moment
698           (there is a small number of Interrupt ReQuest lines in your computer
699           that are used by the attached devices to gain the CPU's attention --
700           often a source of trouble if two devices are mistakenly configured
701           to use the same IRQ). The program procinfo to display some
702           information about your system gathered from the /proc file system.
703
704           Before you can use the /proc file system, it has to be mounted,
705           meaning it has to be given a location in the directory hierarchy.
706           That location should be /proc. A command such as "mount -t proc proc
707           /proc" or the equivalent line in /etc/fstab does the job.
708
709           The /proc file system is explained in the file
710           <file:Documentation/filesystems/proc.txt> and on the proc(5) manpage
711           ("man 5 proc").
712
713           This option will enlarge your kernel by about 67 KB. Several
714           programs depend on this, so everyone should say Y here.
715
716 config PROC_KCORE
717         bool "/proc/kcore support" if !ARM
718         depends on PROC_FS && MMU
719
720 config SYSFS
721         bool "sysfs file system support" if EMBEDDED
722         default y
723         help
724         The sysfs filesystem is a virtual filesystem that the kernel uses to
725         export internal kernel objects, their attributes, and their
726         relationships to one another.
727
728         Users can use sysfs to ascertain useful information about the running
729         kernel, such as the devices the kernel has discovered on each bus and
730         which driver each is bound to. sysfs can also be used to tune devices
731         and other kernel subsystems.
732
733         Some system agents rely on the information in sysfs to operate.
734         /sbin/hotplug uses device and object attributes in sysfs to assist in
735         delegating policy decisions, like persistantly naming devices.
736
737         sysfs is currently used by the block subsystem to mount the root
738         partition.  If sysfs is disabled you must specify the boot device on
739         the kernel boot command line via its major and minor numbers.  For
740         example, "root=03:01" for /dev/hda1.
741
742         Designers of embedded systems may wish to say N here to conserve space.
743
744 config DEVPTS_FS_XATTR
745         bool "/dev/pts Extended Attributes"
746         depends on UNIX98_PTYS
747         help
748           Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
749           the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
750           <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
751
752           If unsure, say N.
753
754 config DEVPTS_FS_SECURITY
755         bool "/dev/pts Security Labels"
756         depends on DEVPTS_FS_XATTR
757         help
758           Security labels support alternative access control models
759           implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
760           enables an extended attribute handler for file security
761           labels in the /dev/pts filesystem.
762
763           If you are not using a security module that requires using
764           extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
765
766 config TMPFS
767         bool "Virtual memory file system support (former shm fs)"
768         help
769           Tmpfs is a file system which keeps all files in virtual memory.
770
771           Everything in tmpfs is temporary in the sense that no files will be
772           created on your hard drive. The files live in memory and swap
773           space. If you unmount a tmpfs instance, everything stored therein is
774           lost.
775
776           See <file:Documentation/filesystems/tmpfs.txt> for details.
777
778 config TMPFS_XATTR
779         bool "tmpfs Extended Attributes"
780         depends on TMPFS
781         help
782           Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
783           the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
784           <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).
785
786           If unsure, say N.
787
788 config TMPFS_SECURITY
789         bool "tmpfs Security Labels"
790         depends on TMPFS_XATTR
791         help
792           Security labels support alternative access control models
793           implemented by security modules like SELinux.  This option
794           enables an extended attribute handler for file security
795           labels in the tmpfs filesystem.
796           If you are not using a security module that requires using
797           extended attributes for file security labels, say N.
798
799 config HUGETLBFS
800         bool "HugeTLB file system support"
801         depends X86 || IA64 || PPC64 || SPARC64 || SUPERH || X86_64 || BROKEN
802
803 config HUGETLB_PAGE
804         def_bool HUGETLBFS
805
806 config RAMFS
807         bool
808         default y
809         ---help---
810           Ramfs is a file system which keeps all files in RAM. It allows
811           read and write access.
812
813           It is more of an programming example than a useable file system.  If
814           you need a file system which lives in RAM with limit checking use
815           tmpfs.
816
817           To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
818           ramfs.
819
820 endmenu
821
822 menu "Miscellaneous filesystems"
823
824 config ADFS_FS
825         tristate "ADFS file system support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
826         depends on EXPERIMENTAL
827         help
828           The Acorn Disc Filing System is the standard file system of the
829           RiscOS operating system which runs on Acorn's ARM-based Risc PC
830           systems and the Acorn Archimedes range of machines. If you say Y
831           here, Linux will be able to read from ADFS partitions on hard drives
832           and from ADFS-formatted floppy discs. If you also want to be able to
833           write to those devices, say Y to "ADFS write support" below.
834
835           The ADFS partition should be the first partition (i.e.,
836           /dev/[hs]d?1) on each of your drives. Please read the file
837           <file:Documentation/filesystems/adfs.txt> for further details.
838
839           To compile this code as a module, choose M here: the module will be
840           called adfs.
841
842           If unsure, say N.
843
844 config ADFS_FS_RW
845         bool "ADFS write support (DANGEROUS)"
846         depends on ADFS_FS
847         help
848           If you say Y here, you will be able to write to ADFS partitions on
849           hard drives and ADFS-formatted floppy disks. This is experimental
850           codes, so if you're unsure, say N.
851
852 config AFFS_FS
853         tristate "Amiga FFS file system support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
854         depends on EXPERIMENTAL
855         help
856           The Fast File System (FFS) is the common file system used on hard
857           disks by Amiga(tm) systems since AmigaOS Version 1.3 (34.20).  Say Y
858           if you want to be able to read and write files from and to an Amiga
859           FFS partition on your hard drive.  Amiga floppies however cannot be
860           read with this driver due to an incompatibility of the floppy
861           controller used in an Amiga and the standard floppy controller in
862           PCs and workstations. Read <file:Documentation/filesystems/affs.txt>
863           and <file:fs/affs/Changes>.
864
865           With this driver you can also mount disk files used by Bernd
866           Schmidt's Un*X Amiga Emulator
867           (<http://www.freiburg.linux.de/~uae/>).
868           If you want to do this, you will also need to say Y or M to "Loop
869           device support", above.
870
871           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
872           module will be called affs.  If unsure, say N.
873
874 config HFS_FS
875         tristate "Apple Macintosh file system support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
876         depends on EXPERIMENTAL
877         help
878           If you say Y here, you will be able to mount Macintosh-formatted
879           floppy disks and hard drive partitions with full read-write access.
880           Please read <file:fs/hfs/HFS.txt> to learn about the available mount
881           options.
882
883           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
884           module will be called hfs.
885
886 config HFSPLUS_FS
887         tristate "Apple Extended HFS file system support"
888         select NLS
889         select NLS_UTF8
890         help
891           If you say Y here, you will be able to mount extended format
892           Macintosh-formatted hard drive partitions with full read-write access.
893
894           This file system is often called HFS+ and was introduced with
895           MacOS 8. It includes all Mac specific filesystem data such as
896           data forks and creator codes, but it also has several UNIX
897           style features such as file ownership and permissions.
898
899 config BEFS_FS
900         tristate "BeOS file system (BeFS) support (read only) (EXPERIMENTAL)"
901         depends on EXPERIMENTAL
902         select NLS
903         help
904           The BeOS File System (BeFS) is the native file system of Be, Inc's
905           BeOS. Notable features include support for arbitrary attributes
906           on files and directories, and database-like indeces on selected
907           attributes. (Also note that this driver doesn't make those features
908           available at this time). It is a 64 bit filesystem, so it supports
909           extremly large volumes and files.
910
911           If you use this filesystem, you should also say Y to at least one
912           of the NLS (native language support) options below.
913
914           If you don't know what this is about, say N.
915
916           To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be
917           called befs.
918
919 config BEFS_DEBUG
920         bool "Debug BeFS"
921         depends on BEFS_FS
922         help
923           If you say Y here, you can use the 'debug' mount option to enable
924           debugging output from the driver. 
925
926 config BFS_FS
927         tristate "BFS file system support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
928         depends on EXPERIMENTAL
929         help
930           Boot File System (BFS) is a file system used under SCO UnixWare to
931           allow the bootloader access to the kernel image and other important
932           files during the boot process.  It is usually mounted under /stand
933           and corresponds to the slice marked as "STAND" in the UnixWare
934           partition.  You should say Y if you want to read or write the files
935           on your /stand slice from within Linux.  You then also need to say Y
936           to "UnixWare slices support", below.  More information about the BFS
937           file system is contained in the file
938           <file:Documentation/filesystems/bfs.txt>.
939
940           If you don't know what this is about, say N.
941
942           To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
943           bfs.  Note that the file system of your root partition (the one
944           containing the directory /) cannot be compiled as a module.
945
946
947
948 config EFS_FS
949         tristate "EFS file system support (read only) (EXPERIMENTAL)"
950         depends on EXPERIMENTAL
951         help
952           EFS is an older file system used for non-ISO9660 CD-ROMs and hard
953           disk partitions by SGI's IRIX operating system (IRIX 6.0 and newer
954           uses the XFS file system for hard disk partitions however).
955
956           This implementation only offers read-only access. If you don't know
957           what all this is about, it's safe to say N. For more information
958           about EFS see its home page at <http://aeschi.ch.eu.org/efs/>.
959
960           To compile the EFS file system support as a module, choose M here: the
961           module will be called efs.
962
963 config JFFS_FS
964         tristate "Journalling Flash File System (JFFS) support"
965         depends on MTD
966         help
967           JFFS is the Journaling Flash File System developed by Axis
968           Communications in Sweden, aimed at providing a crash/powerdown-safe
969           file system for disk-less embedded devices. Further information is
970           available at (<http://developer.axis.com/software/jffs/>).
971
972 config JFFS_FS_VERBOSE
973         int "JFFS debugging verbosity (0 = quiet, 3 = noisy)"
974         depends on JFFS_FS
975         default "0"
976         help
977           Determines the verbosity level of the JFFS debugging messages.
978
979 config JFFS_PROC_FS
980         bool "JFFS stats available in /proc filesystem"
981         depends on JFFS_FS && PROC_FS
982         help
983           Enabling this option will cause statistics from mounted JFFS file systems
984           to be made available to the user in the /proc/fs/jffs/ directory.
985
986 config JFFS2_FS
987         tristate "Journalling Flash File System v2 (JFFS2) support"
988         select CRC32
989         depends on MTD
990         help
991           JFFS2 is the second generation of the Journalling Flash File System
992           for use on diskless embedded devices. It provides improved wear
993           levelling, compression and support for hard links. You cannot use
994           this on normal block devices, only on 'MTD' devices.
995
996           Further information on the design and implementation of JFFS2 is
997           available at <http://sources.redhat.com/jffs2/>.
998
999 config JFFS2_FS_DEBUG
1000         int "JFFS2 debugging verbosity (0 = quiet, 2 = noisy)"
1001         depends on JFFS2_FS
1002         default "0"
1003         help
1004           This controls the amount of debugging messages produced by the JFFS2
1005           code. Set it to zero for use in production systems. For evaluation,
1006           testing and debugging, it's advisable to set it to one. This will
1007           enable a few assertions and will print debugging messages at the
1008           KERN_DEBUG loglevel, where they won't normally be visible. Level 2
1009           is unlikely to be useful - it enables extra debugging in certain
1010           areas which at one point needed debugging, but when the bugs were
1011           located and fixed, the detailed messages were relegated to level 2.
1012
1013           If reporting bugs, please try to have available a full dump of the
1014           messages at debug level 1 while the misbehaviour was occurring.
1015
1016 config JFFS2_FS_NAND
1017         bool "JFFS2 support for NAND flash"
1018         depends on JFFS2_FS
1019         default n
1020         help
1021           This enables the support for NAND flash in JFFS2. NAND is a newer
1022           type of flash chip design than the traditional NOR flash, with
1023           higher density but a handful of characteristics which make it more
1024           interesting for the file system to use.
1025
1026           Say 'N' unless you have NAND flash.
1027
1028 config JFFS2_FS_NOR_ECC
1029         bool "JFFS2 support for ECC'd NOR flash (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1030         depends on JFFS2_FS && EXPERIMENTAL
1031         default n
1032         help
1033           This enables the experimental support for NOR flash with transparent
1034           ECC for JFFS2. This type of flash chip is not common, however it is
1035           available from ST Microelectronics.
1036
1037 config JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
1038         bool "Advanced compression options for JFFS2"
1039         depends on JFFS2_FS
1040         default n
1041         help
1042           Enabling this option allows you to explicitly choose which
1043           compression modules, if any, are enabled in JFFS2. Removing
1044           compressors and mean you cannot read existing file systems,
1045           and enabling experimental compressors can mean that you
1046           write a file system which cannot be read by a standard kernel.
1047
1048           If unsure, you should _definitely_ say 'N'.
1049
1050 config JFFS2_ZLIB
1051         bool "JFFS2 ZLIB compression support" if JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
1052         select ZLIB_INFLATE
1053         select ZLIB_DEFLATE
1054         depends on JFFS2_FS
1055         default y
1056         help
1057           Zlib is designed to be a free, general-purpose, legally unencumbered,
1058           lossless data-compression library for use on virtually any computer 
1059           hardware and operating system. See <http://www.gzip.org/zlib/> for
1060           further information.
1061           
1062           Say 'Y' if unsure.
1063
1064 config JFFS2_RTIME
1065         bool "JFFS2 RTIME compression support" if JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
1066         depends on JFFS2_FS
1067         default y
1068         help
1069           Rtime does manage to recompress already-compressed data. Say 'Y' if unsure.
1070
1071 config JFFS2_RUBIN
1072         bool "JFFS2 RUBIN compression support" if JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
1073         depends on JFFS2_FS
1074         default n
1075         help
1076           RUBINMIPS and DYNRUBIN compressors. Say 'N' if unsure.
1077
1078 choice
1079         prompt "JFFS2 default compression mode" if JFFS2_COMPRESSION_OPTIONS
1080         default JFFS2_CMODE_PRIORITY
1081         depends on JFFS2_FS
1082         help
1083           You can set here the default compression mode of JFFS2 from 
1084           the available compression modes. Don't touch if unsure.
1085
1086 config JFFS2_CMODE_NONE
1087         bool "no compression"
1088         help
1089           Uses no compression.
1090
1091 config JFFS2_CMODE_PRIORITY
1092         bool "priority"
1093         help
1094           Tries the compressors in a predefinied order and chooses the first 
1095           successful one.
1096
1097 config JFFS2_CMODE_SIZE
1098         bool "size (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1099         help
1100           Tries all compressors and chooses the one which has the smallest 
1101           result.
1102
1103 endchoice
1104
1105 config CRAMFS
1106         tristate "Compressed ROM file system support (cramfs)"
1107         select ZLIB_INFLATE
1108         help
1109           Saying Y here includes support for CramFs (Compressed ROM File
1110           System).  CramFs is designed to be a simple, small, and compressed
1111           file system for ROM based embedded systems.  CramFs is read-only,
1112           limited to 256MB file systems (with 16MB files), and doesn't support
1113           16/32 bits uid/gid, hard links and timestamps.
1114
1115           See <file:Documentation/filesystems/cramfs.txt> and
1116           <file:fs/cramfs/README> for further information.
1117
1118           To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
1119           cramfs.  Note that the root file system (the one containing the
1120           directory /) cannot be compiled as a module.
1121
1122           If unsure, say N.
1123
1124 config VXFS_FS
1125         tristate "FreeVxFS file system support (VERITAS VxFS(TM) compatible)"
1126         help
1127           FreeVxFS is a file system driver that support the VERITAS VxFS(TM)
1128           file system format.  VERITAS VxFS(TM) is the standard file system
1129           of SCO UnixWare (and possibly others) and optionally available
1130           for Sunsoft Solaris, HP-UX and many other operating systems.
1131           Currently only readonly access is supported.
1132
1133           NOTE: the file system type as used by mount(1), mount(2) and
1134           fstab(5) is 'vxfs' as it describes the file system format, not
1135           the actual driver.
1136
1137           To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be
1138           called freevxfs.  If unsure, say N.
1139
1140
1141 config HPFS_FS
1142         tristate "OS/2 HPFS file system support"
1143         help
1144           OS/2 is IBM's operating system for PC's, the same as Warp, and HPFS
1145           is the file system used for organizing files on OS/2 hard disk
1146           partitions. Say Y if you want to be able to read files from and
1147           write files to an OS/2 HPFS partition on your hard drive. OS/2
1148           floppies however are in regular MSDOS format, so you don't need this
1149           option in order to be able to read them. Read
1150           <file:Documentation/filesystems/hpfs.txt>.
1151
1152           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
1153           module will be called hpfs.  If unsure, say N.
1154
1155
1156
1157 config QNX4FS_FS
1158         tristate "QNX4 file system support (read only)"
1159         help
1160           This is the file system used by the real-time operating systems
1161           QNX 4 and QNX 6 (the latter is also called QNX RTP).
1162           Further information is available at <http://www.qnx.com/>.
1163           Say Y if you intend to mount QNX hard disks or floppies.
1164           Unless you say Y to "QNX4FS read-write support" below, you will
1165           only be able to read these file systems.
1166
1167           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
1168           module will be called qnx4.
1169
1170           If you don't know whether you need it, then you don't need it:
1171           answer N.
1172
1173 config QNX4FS_RW
1174         bool "QNX4FS write support (DANGEROUS)"
1175         depends on QNX4FS_FS && EXPERIMENTAL && BROKEN
1176         help
1177           Say Y if you want to test write support for QNX4 file systems.
1178
1179           It's currently broken, so for now:
1180           answer N.
1181
1182
1183
1184 config SYSV_FS
1185         tristate "System V/Xenix/V7/Coherent file system support"
1186         help
1187           SCO, Xenix and Coherent are commercial Unix systems for Intel
1188           machines, and Version 7 was used on the DEC PDP-11. Saying Y
1189           here would allow you to read from their floppies and hard disk
1190           partitions.
1191
1192           If you have floppies or hard disk partitions like that, it is likely
1193           that they contain binaries from those other Unix systems; in order
1194           to run these binaries, you will want to install linux-abi which is a
1195           a set of kernel modules that lets you run SCO, Xenix, Wyse,
1196           UnixWare, Dell Unix and System V programs under Linux.  It is
1197           available via FTP (user: ftp) from
1198           <ftp://ftp.openlinux.org/pub/people/hch/linux-abi/>).
1199           NOTE: that will work only for binaries from Intel-based systems;
1200           PDP ones will have to wait until somebody ports Linux to -11 ;-)
1201
1202           If you only intend to mount files from some other Unix over the
1203           network using NFS, you don't need the System V file system support
1204           (but you need NFS file system support obviously).
1205
1206           Note that this option is generally not needed for floppies, since a
1207           good portable way to transport files and directories between unixes
1208           (and even other operating systems) is given by the tar program ("man
1209           tar" or preferably "info tar").  Note also that this option has
1210           nothing whatsoever to do with the option "System V IPC". Read about
1211           the System V file system in
1212           <file:Documentation/filesystems/sysv-fs.txt>.
1213           Saying Y here will enlarge your kernel by about 27 KB.
1214
1215           To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
1216           sysv.
1217
1218           If you haven't heard about all of this before, it's safe to say N.
1219
1220
1221
1222 config UFS_FS
1223         tristate "UFS file system support (read only)"
1224         help
1225           BSD and derivate versions of Unix (such as SunOS, FreeBSD, NetBSD,
1226           OpenBSD and NeXTstep) use a file system called UFS. Some System V
1227           Unixes can create and mount hard disk partitions and diskettes using
1228           this file system as well. Saying Y here will allow you to read from
1229           these partitions; if you also want to write to them, say Y to the
1230           experimental "UFS file system write support", below. Please read the
1231           file <file:Documentation/filesystems/ufs.txt> for more information.
1232
1233           The recently released UFS2 variant (used in FreeBSD 5.x) is
1234           READ-ONLY supported.
1235
1236           If you only intend to mount files from some other Unix over the
1237           network using NFS, you don't need the UFS file system support (but
1238           you need NFS file system support obviously).
1239
1240           Note that this option is generally not needed for floppies, since a
1241           good portable way to transport files and directories between unixes
1242           (and even other operating systems) is given by the tar program ("man
1243           tar" or preferably "info tar").
1244
1245           When accessing NeXTstep files, you may need to convert them from the
1246           NeXT character set to the Latin1 character set; use the program
1247           recode ("info recode") for this purpose.
1248
1249           To compile the UFS file system support as a module, choose M here: the
1250           module will be called ufs.
1251
1252           If you haven't heard about all of this before, it's safe to say N.
1253
1254 config UFS_FS_WRITE
1255         bool "UFS file system write support (DANGEROUS)"
1256         depends on UFS_FS && EXPERIMENTAL
1257         help
1258           Say Y here if you want to try writing to UFS partitions. This is
1259           experimental, so you should back up your UFS partitions beforehand.
1260
1261 endmenu
1262
1263 menu "Network File Systems"
1264         depends on NET
1265
1266 config NFS_FS
1267         tristate "NFS file system support"
1268         depends on INET
1269         select LOCKD
1270         select SUNRPC
1271         help
1272           If you are connected to some other (usually local) Unix computer
1273           (using SLIP, PLIP, PPP or Ethernet) and want to mount files residing
1274           on that computer (the NFS server) using the Network File Sharing
1275           protocol, say Y. "Mounting files" means that the client can access
1276           the files with usual UNIX commands as if they were sitting on the
1277           client's hard disk. For this to work, the server must run the
1278           programs nfsd and mountd (but does not need to have NFS file system
1279           support enabled in its kernel). NFS is explained in the Network
1280           Administrator's Guide, available from
1281           <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#guide>, on its man page: "man
1282           nfs", and in the NFS-HOWTO.
1283
1284           A superior but less widely used alternative to NFS is provided by
1285           the Coda file system; see "Coda file system support" below.
1286
1287           If you say Y here, you should have said Y to TCP/IP networking also.
1288           This option would enlarge your kernel by about 27 KB.
1289
1290           To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the
1291           module will be called nfs.
1292
1293           If you are configuring a diskless machine which will mount its root
1294           file system over NFS at boot time, say Y here and to "Kernel
1295           level IP autoconfiguration" above and to "Root file system on NFS"
1296           below. You cannot compile this driver as a module in this case.
1297           There are two packages designed for booting diskless machines over
1298           the net: netboot, available from
1299           <http://ftp1.sourceforge.net/netboot/>, and Etherboot,
1300           available from <http://ftp1.sourceforge.net/etherboot/>.
1301
1302           If you don't know what all this is about, say N.
1303
1304 config NFS_V3
1305         bool "Provide NFSv3 client support"
1306         depends on NFS_FS
1307         help
1308           Say Y here if you want your NFS client to be able to speak version
1309           3 of the NFS protocol.
1310
1311           If unsure, say Y.
1312
1313 config NFS_V4
1314         bool "Provide NFSv4 client support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1315         depends on NFS_FS && EXPERIMENTAL
1316         select RPCSEC_GSS_KRB5
1317         help
1318           Say Y here if you want your NFS client to be able to speak the newer
1319           version 4 of the NFS protocol.
1320
1321           Note: Requires auxiliary userspace daemons which may be found on
1322                 http://www.citi.umich.edu/projects/nfsv4/
1323
1324           If unsure, say N.
1325
1326 config NFS_DIRECTIO
1327         bool "Allow direct I/O on NFS files (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1328         depends on NFS_FS && EXPERIMENTAL
1329         help
1330           This option enables applications to perform uncached I/O on files
1331           in NFS file systems using the O_DIRECT open() flag.  When O_DIRECT
1332           is set for a file, its data is not cached in the system's page
1333           cache.  Data is moved to and from user-level application buffers
1334           directly.  Unlike local disk-based file systems, NFS O_DIRECT has
1335           no alignment restrictions.
1336
1337           Unless your program is designed to use O_DIRECT properly, you are
1338           much better off allowing the NFS client to manage data caching for
1339           you.  Misusing O_DIRECT can cause poor server performance or network
1340           storms.  This kernel build option defaults OFF to avoid exposing
1341           system administrators unwittingly to a potentially hazardous
1342           feature.
1343
1344           For more details on NFS O_DIRECT, see fs/nfs/direct.c.
1345
1346           If unsure, say N.  This reduces the size of the NFS client, and
1347           causes open() to return EINVAL if a file residing in NFS is
1348           opened with the O_DIRECT flag.
1349
1350 config NFSD
1351         tristate "NFS server support"
1352         depends on INET
1353         select LOCKD
1354         select SUNRPC
1355         select EXPORTFS
1356         select NFS_ACL_SUPPORT if NFSD_V3_ACL || NFSD_V2_ACL
1357         help
1358           If you want your Linux box to act as an NFS *server*, so that other
1359           computers on your local network which support NFS can access certain
1360           directories on your box transparently, you have two options: you can
1361           use the self-contained user space program nfsd, in which case you
1362           should say N here, or you can say Y and use the kernel based NFS
1363           server. The advantage of the kernel based solution is that it is
1364           faster.
1365
1366           In either case, you will need support software; the respective
1367           locations are given in the file <file:Documentation/Changes> in the
1368           NFS section.
1369
1370           If you say Y here, you will get support for version 2 of the NFS
1371           protocol (NFSv2). If you also want NFSv3, say Y to the next question
1372           as well.
1373
1374           Please read the NFS-HOWTO, available from
1375           <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
1376
1377           To compile the NFS server support as a module, choose M here: the
1378           module will be called nfsd.  If unsure, say N.
1379
1380 config NFSD_V2_ACL
1381         bool
1382         depends on NFSD
1383
1384 config NFSD_V3
1385         bool "Provide NFSv3 server support"
1386         depends on NFSD
1387         help
1388           If you would like to include the NFSv3 server as well as the NFSv2
1389           server, say Y here.  If unsure, say Y.
1390
1391 config NFSD_V3_ACL
1392         bool "Provide server support for the NFSv3 ACL protocol extension"
1393         depends on NFSD_V3
1394         select NFSD_V2_ACL
1395         help
1396           Implement the NFSv3 ACL protocol extension for manipulating POSIX
1397           Access Control Lists on exported file systems. NFS clients should
1398           be compiled with the NFSv3 ACL protocol extension; see the
1399           CONFIG_NFS_V3_ACL option.  If unsure, say N.
1400
1401 config NFSD_V4
1402         bool "Provide NFSv4 server support (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1403         depends on NFSD_V3 && EXPERIMENTAL
1404         select NFSD_TCP
1405         help
1406           If you would like to include the NFSv4 server as well as the NFSv2
1407           and NFSv3 servers, say Y here.  This feature is experimental, and
1408           should only be used if you are interested in helping to test NFSv4.
1409           If unsure, say N.
1410
1411 config NFSD_TCP
1412         bool "Provide NFS server over TCP support"
1413         depends on NFSD
1414         default y
1415         help
1416           If you want your NFS server to support TCP connections, say Y here.
1417           TCP connections usually perform better than the default UDP when
1418           the network is lossy or congested.  If unsure, say Y.
1419
1420 config ROOT_NFS
1421         bool "Root file system on NFS"
1422         depends on NFS_FS=y && IP_PNP
1423         help
1424           If you want your Linux box to mount its whole root file system (the
1425           one containing the directory /) from some other computer over the
1426           net via NFS (presumably because your box doesn't have a hard disk),
1427           say Y. Read <file:Documentation/nfsroot.txt> for details. It is
1428           likely that in this case, you also want to say Y to "Kernel level IP
1429           autoconfiguration" so that your box can discover its network address
1430           at boot time.
1431
1432           Most people say N here.
1433
1434 config LOCKD
1435         tristate
1436
1437 config LOCKD_V4
1438         bool
1439         depends on NFSD_V3 || NFS_V3
1440         default y
1441
1442 config EXPORTFS
1443         tristate
1444
1445 config NFS_ACL_SUPPORT
1446         tristate
1447         select FS_POSIX_ACL
1448
1449 config NFS_COMMON
1450         bool
1451         depends on NFSD || NFS_FS
1452         default y
1453
1454 config SUNRPC
1455         tristate
1456
1457 config SUNRPC_GSS
1458         tristate
1459
1460 config RPCSEC_GSS_KRB5
1461         tristate "Secure RPC: Kerberos V mechanism (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1462         depends on SUNRPC && EXPERIMENTAL
1463         select SUNRPC_GSS
1464         select CRYPTO
1465         select CRYPTO_MD5
1466         select CRYPTO_DES
1467         help
1468           Provides for secure RPC calls by means of a gss-api
1469           mechanism based on Kerberos V5. This is required for
1470           NFSv4.
1471
1472           Note: Requires an auxiliary userspace daemon which may be found on
1473                 http://www.citi.umich.edu/projects/nfsv4/
1474
1475           If unsure, say N.
1476
1477 config RPCSEC_GSS_SPKM3
1478         tristate "Secure RPC: SPKM3 mechanism (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1479         depends on SUNRPC && EXPERIMENTAL
1480         select SUNRPC_GSS
1481         select CRYPTO
1482         select CRYPTO_MD5
1483         select CRYPTO_DES
1484         help
1485           Provides for secure RPC calls by means of a gss-api
1486           mechanism based on the SPKM3 public-key mechanism.
1487
1488           Note: Requires an auxiliary userspace daemon which may be found on
1489                 http://www.citi.umich.edu/projects/nfsv4/
1490
1491           If unsure, say N.
1492
1493 config SMB_FS
1494         tristate "SMB file system support (to mount Windows shares etc.)"
1495         depends on INET
1496         select NLS
1497         help
1498           SMB (Server Message Block) is the protocol Windows for Workgroups
1499           (WfW), Windows 95/98, Windows NT and OS/2 Lan Manager use to share
1500           files and printers over local networks.  Saying Y here allows you to
1501           mount their file systems (often called "shares" in this context) and
1502           access them just like any other Unix directory.  Currently, this
1503           works only if the Windows machines use TCP/IP as the underlying
1504           transport protocol, and not NetBEUI.  For details, read
1505           <file:Documentation/filesystems/smbfs.txt> and the SMB-HOWTO,
1506           available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
1507
1508           Note: if you just want your box to act as an SMB *server* and make
1509           files and printing services available to Windows clients (which need
1510           to have a TCP/IP stack), you don't need to say Y here; you can use
1511           the program SAMBA (available from <ftp://ftp.samba.org/pub/samba/>)
1512           for that.
1513
1514           General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and
1515           Macs is on the WWW at <http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html>.
1516
1517           To compile the SMB support as a module, choose M here: the module will
1518           be called smbfs.  Most people say N, however.
1519
1520 config SMB_NLS_DEFAULT
1521         bool "Use a default NLS"
1522         depends on SMB_FS
1523         help
1524           Enabling this will make smbfs use nls translations by default. You
1525           need to specify the local charset (CONFIG_NLS_DEFAULT) in the nls
1526           settings and you need to give the default nls for the SMB server as
1527           CONFIG_SMB_NLS_REMOTE.
1528
1529           The nls settings can be changed at mount time, if your smbmount
1530           supports that, using the codepage and iocharset parameters.
1531
1532           smbmount from samba 2.2.0 or later supports this.
1533
1534 config SMB_NLS_REMOTE
1535         string "Default Remote NLS Option"
1536         depends on SMB_NLS_DEFAULT
1537         default "cp437"
1538         help
1539           This setting allows you to specify a default value for which
1540           codepage the server uses. If this field is left blank no
1541           translations will be done by default. The local codepage/charset
1542           default to CONFIG_NLS_DEFAULT.
1543
1544           The nls settings can be changed at mount time, if your smbmount
1545           supports that, using the codepage and iocharset parameters.
1546
1547           smbmount from samba 2.2.0 or later supports this.
1548
1549 config CIFS
1550         tristate "CIFS support (advanced network filesystem for Samba, Window and other CIFS compliant servers)"
1551         depends on INET
1552         select NLS
1553         help
1554           This is the client VFS module for the Common Internet File System
1555           (CIFS) protocol which is the successor to the Server Message Block 
1556           (SMB) protocol, the native file sharing mechanism for most early
1557           PC operating systems.  The CIFS protocol is fully supported by 
1558           file servers such as Windows 2000 (including Windows 2003, NT 4  
1559           and Windows XP) as well by Samba (which provides excellent CIFS
1560           server support for Linux and many other operating systems). Currently
1561           you must use the smbfs client filesystem to access older SMB servers
1562           such as Windows 9x and OS/2.
1563
1564           The intent of the cifs module is to provide an advanced
1565           network file system client for mounting to CIFS compliant servers, 
1566           including support for dfs (hierarchical name space), secure per-user
1567           session establishment, safe distributed caching (oplock), optional
1568           packet signing, Unicode and other internationalization improvements, 
1569           and optional Winbind (nsswitch) integration. You do not need to enable
1570           cifs if running only a (Samba) server. It is possible to enable both
1571           smbfs and cifs (e.g. if you are using CIFS for accessing Windows 2003
1572           and Samba 3 servers, and smbfs for accessing old servers). If you need 
1573           to mount to Samba or Windows 2003 servers from this machine, say Y.
1574
1575 config CIFS_STATS
1576         bool "CIFS statistics"
1577         depends on CIFS
1578         help
1579           Enabling this option will cause statistics for each server share
1580           mounted by the cifs client to be displayed in /proc/fs/cifs/Stats
1581
1582 config CIFS_XATTR
1583         bool "CIFS extended attributes (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1584         depends on CIFS
1585         help
1586           Extended attributes are name:value pairs associated with inodes by
1587           the kernel or by users (see the attr(5) manual page, or visit
1588           <http://acl.bestbits.at/> for details).  CIFS maps the name of
1589           extended attributes beginning with the user namespace prefix
1590           to SMB/CIFS EAs. EAs are stored on Windows servers without the
1591           user namespace prefix, but their names are seen by Linux cifs clients
1592           prefaced by the user namespace prefix. The system namespace
1593           (used by some filesystems to store ACLs) is not supported at
1594           this time.
1595                                                                                                     
1596           If unsure, say N.
1597
1598 config CIFS_POSIX
1599         bool "CIFS POSIX Extensions (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1600         depends on CIFS_XATTR
1601         help
1602           Enabling this option will cause the cifs client to attempt to
1603           negotiate a newer dialect with servers, such as Samba 3.0.5
1604           or later, that optionally can handle more POSIX like (rather
1605           than Windows like) file behavior.  It also enables
1606           support for POSIX ACLs (getfacl and setfacl) to servers
1607           (such as Samba 3.10 and later) which can negotiate
1608           CIFS POSIX ACL support.  If unsure, say N.
1609
1610 config CIFS_EXPERIMENTAL
1611           bool "CIFS Experimental Features (EXPERIMENTAL)"
1612           depends on CIFS
1613           help
1614             Enables cifs features under testing. These features
1615             are highly experimental.  If unsure, say N.
1616
1617 config NCP_FS
1618         tristate "NCP file system support (to mount NetWare volumes)"
1619         depends on IPX!=n || INET
1620         help
1621           NCP (NetWare Core Protocol) is a protocol that runs over IPX and is
1622           used by Novell NetWare clients to talk to file servers.  It is to
1623           IPX what NFS is to TCP/IP, if that helps.  Saying Y here allows you
1624           to mount NetWare file server volumes and to access them just like
1625           any other Unix directory.  For details, please read the file
1626           <file:Documentation/filesystems/ncpfs.txt> in the kernel source and
1627           the IPX-HOWTO from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
1628
1629           You do not have to say Y here if you want your Linux box to act as a
1630           file *server* for Novell NetWare clients.
1631
1632           General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and
1633           Macs is on the WWW at <http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html>.
1634
1635           To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called
1636           ncpfs.  Say N unless you are connected to a Novell network.
1637
1638 source "fs/ncpfs/Kconfig"
1639
1640 config CODA_FS
1641         tristate "Coda file system support (advanced network fs)"
1642         depends on INET
1643         help
1644           Coda is an advanced network file system, similar to NFS in that it
1645           enables you to mount file systems of a remote server and access them
1646           with regular Unix commands as if they were sitting on your hard
1647           disk.  Coda has several advantages over NFS: support for
1648           disconnected operation (e.g. for laptops), read/write server
1649           replication, security model for authentication and encryption,
1650           persistent client caches and write back caching.
1651
1652           If you say Y here, your Linux box will be able to act as a Coda
1653           *client*.  You will need user level code as well, both for the
1654           client and server.  Servers are currently user level, i.e. they need
1655           no kernel support.  Please read
1656           <file:Documentation/filesystems/coda.txt> and check out the Coda
1657           home page <http://www.coda.cs.cmu.edu/>.
1658
1659           To compile the coda client support as a module, choose M here: the
1660           module will be called coda.
1661
1662 config CODA_FS_OLD_API
1663         bool "Use 96-bit Coda file identifiers"
1664         depends on CODA_FS
1665         help
1666           A new kernel-userspace API had to be introduced for Coda v6.0
1667           to support larger 128-bit file identifiers as needed by the
1668           new realms implementation.
1669
1670           However this new API is not backward compatible with older
1671           clients. If you really need to run the old Coda userspace
1672           cache manager then say Y.
1673           
1674           For most cases you probably want to say N.
1675
1676 config AFS_FS
1677 # for fs/nls/Config.in
1678         tristate "Andrew File System support (AFS) (Experimental)"
1679         depends on INET && EXPERIMENTAL
1680         select RXRPC
1681         help
1682           If you say Y here, you will get an experimental Andrew File System
1683           driver. It currently only supports unsecured read-only AFS access.
1684
1685           See <file:Documentation/filesystems/afs.txt> for more intormation.
1686
1687           If unsure, say N.
1688
1689 config RXRPC
1690         tristate
1691
1692 endmenu
1693
1694 menu "Partition Types"
1695
1696 source "fs/partitions/Kconfig"
1697
1698 endmenu
1699
1700 source "fs/nls/Kconfig"
1701
1702 endmenu
1703