lguest: documentation III: Drivers
[linux-2.6.git] / drivers / net / lguest_net.c
1 /*D:500
2  * The Guest network driver.
3  *
4  * This is very simple a virtual network driver, and our last Guest driver.
5  * The only trick is that it can talk directly to multiple other recipients
6  * (ie. other Guests on the same network).  It can also be used with only the
7  * Host on the network.
8  :*/
9
10 /* Copyright 2006 Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> IBM Corporation
11  *
12  * This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
13  * it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
14  * the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
15  * (at your option) any later version.
16  *
17  * This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
18  * but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
19  * MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
20  * GNU General Public License for more details.
21  *
22  * You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
23  * along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
24  * Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307  USA
25  */
26 //#define DEBUG
27 #include <linux/netdevice.h>
28 #include <linux/etherdevice.h>
29 #include <linux/module.h>
30 #include <linux/mm_types.h>
31 #include <linux/io.h>
32 #include <linux/lguest_bus.h>
33
34 #define SHARED_SIZE             PAGE_SIZE
35 #define MAX_LANS                4
36 #define NUM_SKBS                8
37
38 /*D:530 The "struct lguestnet_info" contains all the information we need to
39  * know about the network device. */
40 struct lguestnet_info
41 {
42         /* The mapped device page(s) (an array of "struct lguest_net"). */
43         struct lguest_net *peer;
44         /* The physical address of the device page(s) */
45         unsigned long peer_phys;
46         /* The size of the device page(s). */
47         unsigned long mapsize;
48
49         /* The lguest_device I come from */
50         struct lguest_device *lgdev;
51
52         /* My peerid (ie. my slot in the array). */
53         unsigned int me;
54
55         /* Receive queue: the network packets waiting to be filled. */
56         struct sk_buff *skb[NUM_SKBS];
57         struct lguest_dma dma[NUM_SKBS];
58 };
59 /*:*/
60
61 /* How many bytes left in this page. */
62 static unsigned int rest_of_page(void *data)
63 {
64         return PAGE_SIZE - ((unsigned long)data % PAGE_SIZE);
65 }
66
67 /*D:570 Each peer (ie. Guest or Host) on the network binds their receive
68  * buffers to a different key: we simply use the physical address of the
69  * device's memory page plus the peer number.  The Host insists that all keys
70  * be a multiple of 4, so we multiply the peer number by 4. */
71 static unsigned long peer_key(struct lguestnet_info *info, unsigned peernum)
72 {
73         return info->peer_phys + 4 * peernum;
74 }
75
76 /* This is the routine which sets up a "struct lguest_dma" to point to a
77  * network packet, similar to req_to_dma() in lguest_blk.c.  The structure of a
78  * "struct sk_buff" has grown complex over the years: it consists of a "head"
79  * linear section pointed to by "skb->data", and possibly an array of
80  * "fragments" in the case of a non-linear packet.
81  *
82  * Our receive buffers don't use fragments at all but outgoing skbs might, so
83  * we handle it. */
84 static void skb_to_dma(const struct sk_buff *skb, unsigned int headlen,
85                        struct lguest_dma *dma)
86 {
87         unsigned int i, seg;
88
89         /* First, we put the linear region into the "struct lguest_dma".  Each
90          * entry can't go over a page boundary, so even though all our packets
91          * are 1514 bytes or less, we might need to use two entries here: */
92         for (i = seg = 0; i < headlen; seg++, i += rest_of_page(skb->data+i)) {
93                 dma->addr[seg] = virt_to_phys(skb->data + i);
94                 dma->len[seg] = min((unsigned)(headlen - i),
95                                     rest_of_page(skb->data + i));
96         }
97
98         /* Now we handle the fragments: at least they're guaranteed not to go
99          * over a page.  skb_shinfo(skb) returns a pointer to the structure
100          * which tells us about the number of fragments and the fragment
101          * array. */
102         for (i = 0; i < skb_shinfo(skb)->nr_frags; i++, seg++) {
103                 const skb_frag_t *f = &skb_shinfo(skb)->frags[i];
104                 /* Should not happen with MTU less than 64k - 2 * PAGE_SIZE. */
105                 if (seg == LGUEST_MAX_DMA_SECTIONS) {
106                         /* We will end up sending a truncated packet should
107                          * this ever happen.  Plus, a cool log message! */
108                         printk("Woah dude!  Megapacket!\n");
109                         break;
110                 }
111                 dma->addr[seg] = page_to_phys(f->page) + f->page_offset;
112                 dma->len[seg] = f->size;
113         }
114
115         /* If after all that we didn't use the entire "struct lguest_dma"
116          * array, we terminate it with a 0 length. */
117         if (seg < LGUEST_MAX_DMA_SECTIONS)
118                 dma->len[seg] = 0;
119 }
120
121 /*
122  * Packet transmission.
123  *
124  * Our packet transmission is a little unusual.  A real network card would just
125  * send out the packet and leave the receivers to decide if they're interested.
126  * Instead, we look through the network device memory page and see if any of
127  * the ethernet addresses match the packet destination, and if so we send it to
128  * that Guest.
129  *
130  * This is made a little more complicated in two cases.  The first case is
131  * broadcast packets: for that we send the packet to all Guests on the network,
132  * one at a time.  The second case is "promiscuous" mode, where a Guest wants
133  * to see all the packets on the network.  We need a way for the Guest to tell
134  * us it wants to see all packets, so it sets the "multicast" bit on its
135  * published MAC address, which is never valid in a real ethernet address.
136  */
137 #define PROMISC_BIT             0x01
138
139 /* This is the callback which is summoned whenever the network device's
140  * multicast or promiscuous state changes.  If the card is in promiscuous mode,
141  * we advertise that in our ethernet address in the device's memory.  We do the
142  * same if Linux wants any or all multicast traffic.  */
143 static void lguestnet_set_multicast(struct net_device *dev)
144 {
145         struct lguestnet_info *info = netdev_priv(dev);
146
147         if ((dev->flags & (IFF_PROMISC|IFF_ALLMULTI)) || dev->mc_count)
148                 info->peer[info->me].mac[0] |= PROMISC_BIT;
149         else
150                 info->peer[info->me].mac[0] &= ~PROMISC_BIT;
151 }
152
153 /* A simple test function to see if a peer wants to see all packets.*/
154 static int promisc(struct lguestnet_info *info, unsigned int peer)
155 {
156         return info->peer[peer].mac[0] & PROMISC_BIT;
157 }
158
159 /* Another simple function to see if a peer's advertised ethernet address
160  * matches a packet's destination ethernet address. */
161 static int mac_eq(const unsigned char mac[ETH_ALEN],
162                   struct lguestnet_info *info, unsigned int peer)
163 {
164         /* Ignore multicast bit, which peer turns on to mean promisc. */
165         if ((info->peer[peer].mac[0] & (~PROMISC_BIT)) != mac[0])
166                 return 0;
167         return memcmp(mac+1, info->peer[peer].mac+1, ETH_ALEN-1) == 0;
168 }
169
170 /* This is the function which actually sends a packet once we've decided a
171  * peer wants it: */
172 static void transfer_packet(struct net_device *dev,
173                             struct sk_buff *skb,
174                             unsigned int peernum)
175 {
176         struct lguestnet_info *info = netdev_priv(dev);
177         struct lguest_dma dma;
178
179         /* We use our handy "struct lguest_dma" packing function to prepare
180          * the skb for sending. */
181         skb_to_dma(skb, skb_headlen(skb), &dma);
182         pr_debug("xfer length %04x (%u)\n", htons(skb->len), skb->len);
183
184         /* This is the actual send call which copies the packet. */
185         lguest_send_dma(peer_key(info, peernum), &dma);
186
187         /* Check that the entire packet was transmitted.  If not, it could mean
188          * that the other Guest registered a short receive buffer, but this
189          * driver should never do that.  More likely, the peer is dead. */
190         if (dma.used_len != skb->len) {
191                 dev->stats.tx_carrier_errors++;
192                 pr_debug("Bad xfer to peer %i: %i of %i (dma %p/%i)\n",
193                          peernum, dma.used_len, skb->len,
194                          (void *)dma.addr[0], dma.len[0]);
195         } else {
196                 /* On success we update the stats. */
197                 dev->stats.tx_bytes += skb->len;
198                 dev->stats.tx_packets++;
199         }
200 }
201
202 /* Another helper function to tell is if a slot in the device memory is unused.
203  * Since we always set the Local Assignment bit in the ethernet address, the
204  * first byte can never be 0. */
205 static int unused_peer(const struct lguest_net peer[], unsigned int num)
206 {
207         return peer[num].mac[0] == 0;
208 }
209
210 /* Finally, here is the routine which handles an outgoing packet.  It's called
211  * "start_xmit" for traditional reasons. */
212 static int lguestnet_start_xmit(struct sk_buff *skb, struct net_device *dev)
213 {
214         unsigned int i;
215         int broadcast;
216         struct lguestnet_info *info = netdev_priv(dev);
217         /* Extract the destination ethernet address from the packet. */
218         const unsigned char *dest = ((struct ethhdr *)skb->data)->h_dest;
219
220         pr_debug("%s: xmit %02x:%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x\n",
221                  dev->name, dest[0],dest[1],dest[2],dest[3],dest[4],dest[5]);
222
223         /* If it's a multicast packet, we broadcast to everyone.  That's not
224          * very efficient, but there are very few applications which actually
225          * use multicast, which is a shame really.
226          *
227          * As etherdevice.h points out: "By definition the broadcast address is
228          * also a multicast address."  So we don't have to test for broadcast
229          * packets separately. */
230         broadcast = is_multicast_ether_addr(dest);
231
232         /* Look through all the published ethernet addresses to see if we
233          * should send this packet. */
234         for (i = 0; i < info->mapsize/sizeof(struct lguest_net); i++) {
235                 /* We don't send to ourselves (we actually can't SEND_DMA to
236                  * ourselves anyway), and don't send to unused slots.*/
237                 if (i == info->me || unused_peer(info->peer, i))
238                         continue;
239
240                 /* If it's broadcast we send it.  If they want every packet we
241                  * send it.  If the destination matches their address we send
242                  * it.  Otherwise we go to the next peer. */
243                 if (!broadcast && !promisc(info, i) && !mac_eq(dest, info, i))
244                         continue;
245
246                 pr_debug("lguestnet %s: sending from %i to %i\n",
247                          dev->name, info->me, i);
248                 /* Our routine which actually does the transfer. */
249                 transfer_packet(dev, skb, i);
250         }
251
252         /* An xmit routine is expected to dispose of the packet, so we do. */
253         dev_kfree_skb(skb);
254
255         /* As per kernel convention, 0 means success.  This is why I love
256          * networking: even if we never sent to anyone, that's still
257          * success! */
258         return 0;
259 }
260
261 /*D:560
262  * Packet receiving.
263  *
264  * First, here's a helper routine which fills one of our array of receive
265  * buffers: */
266 static int fill_slot(struct net_device *dev, unsigned int slot)
267 {
268         struct lguestnet_info *info = netdev_priv(dev);
269
270         /* We can receive ETH_DATA_LEN (1500) byte packets, plus a standard
271          * ethernet header of ETH_HLEN (14) bytes. */
272         info->skb[slot] = netdev_alloc_skb(dev, ETH_HLEN + ETH_DATA_LEN);
273         if (!info->skb[slot]) {
274                 printk("%s: could not fill slot %i\n", dev->name, slot);
275                 return -ENOMEM;
276         }
277
278         /* skb_to_dma() is a helper which sets up the "struct lguest_dma" to
279          * point to the data in the skb: we also use it for sending out a
280          * packet. */
281         skb_to_dma(info->skb[slot], ETH_HLEN + ETH_DATA_LEN, &info->dma[slot]);
282
283         /* This is a Write Memory Barrier: it ensures that the entry in the
284          * receive buffer array is written *before* we set the "used_len" entry
285          * to 0.  If the Host were looking at the receive buffer array from a
286          * different CPU, it could potentially see "used_len = 0" and not see
287          * the updated receive buffer information.  This would be a horribly
288          * nasty bug, so make sure the compiler and CPU know this has to happen
289          * first. */
290         wmb();
291         /* Writing 0 to "used_len" tells the Host it can use this receive
292          * buffer now. */
293         info->dma[slot].used_len = 0;
294         return 0;
295 }
296
297 /* This is the actual receive routine.  When we receive an interrupt from the
298  * Host to tell us a packet has been delivered, we arrive here: */
299 static irqreturn_t lguestnet_rcv(int irq, void *dev_id)
300 {
301         struct net_device *dev = dev_id;
302         struct lguestnet_info *info = netdev_priv(dev);
303         unsigned int i, done = 0;
304
305         /* Look through our entire receive array for an entry which has data
306          * in it. */
307         for (i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE(info->dma); i++) {
308                 unsigned int length;
309                 struct sk_buff *skb;
310
311                 length = info->dma[i].used_len;
312                 if (length == 0)
313                         continue;
314
315                 /* We've found one!  Remember the skb (we grabbed the length
316                  * above), and immediately refill the slot we've taken it
317                  * from. */
318                 done++;
319                 skb = info->skb[i];
320                 fill_slot(dev, i);
321
322                 /* This shouldn't happen: micropackets could be sent by a
323                  * badly-behaved Guest on the network, but the Host will never
324                  * stuff more data in the buffer than the buffer length. */
325                 if (length < ETH_HLEN || length > ETH_HLEN + ETH_DATA_LEN) {
326                         pr_debug(KERN_WARNING "%s: unbelievable skb len: %i\n",
327                                  dev->name, length);
328                         dev_kfree_skb(skb);
329                         continue;
330                 }
331
332                 /* skb_put(), what a great function!  I've ranted about this
333                  * function before (http://lkml.org/lkml/1999/9/26/24).  You
334                  * call it after you've added data to the end of an skb (in
335                  * this case, it was the Host which wrote the data). */
336                 skb_put(skb, length);
337
338                 /* The ethernet header contains a protocol field: we use the
339                  * standard helper to extract it, and place the result in
340                  * skb->protocol.  The helper also sets up skb->pkt_type and
341                  * eats up the ethernet header from the front of the packet. */
342                 skb->protocol = eth_type_trans(skb, dev);
343
344                 /* If this device doesn't need checksums for sending, we also
345                  * don't need to check the packets when they come in. */
346                 if (dev->features & NETIF_F_NO_CSUM)
347                         skb->ip_summed = CHECKSUM_UNNECESSARY;
348
349                 /* As a last resort for debugging the driver or the lguest I/O
350                  * subsystem, you can uncomment the "#define DEBUG" at the top
351                  * of this file, which turns all the pr_debug() into printk()
352                  * and floods the logs. */
353                 pr_debug("Receiving skb proto 0x%04x len %i type %i\n",
354                          ntohs(skb->protocol), skb->len, skb->pkt_type);
355
356                 /* Update the packet and byte counts (visible from ifconfig,
357                  * and good for debugging). */
358                 dev->stats.rx_bytes += skb->len;
359                 dev->stats.rx_packets++;
360
361                 /* Hand our fresh network packet into the stack's "network
362                  * interface receive" routine.  That will free the packet
363                  * itself when it's finished. */
364                 netif_rx(skb);
365         }
366
367         /* If we found any packets, we assume the interrupt was for us. */
368         return done ? IRQ_HANDLED : IRQ_NONE;
369 }
370
371 /*D:550 This is where we start: when the device is brought up by dhcpd or
372  * ifconfig.  At this point we advertise our MAC address to the rest of the
373  * network, and register receive buffers ready for incoming packets. */
374 static int lguestnet_open(struct net_device *dev)
375 {
376         int i;
377         struct lguestnet_info *info = netdev_priv(dev);
378
379         /* Copy our MAC address into the device page, so others on the network
380          * can find us. */
381         memcpy(info->peer[info->me].mac, dev->dev_addr, ETH_ALEN);
382
383         /* We might already be in promisc mode (dev->flags & IFF_PROMISC).  Our
384          * set_multicast callback handles this already, so we call it now. */
385         lguestnet_set_multicast(dev);
386
387         /* Allocate packets and put them into our "struct lguest_dma" array.
388          * If we fail to allocate all the packets we could still limp along,
389          * but it's a sign of real stress so we should probably give up now. */
390         for (i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE(info->dma); i++) {
391                 if (fill_slot(dev, i) != 0)
392                         goto cleanup;
393         }
394
395         /* Finally we tell the Host where our array of "struct lguest_dma"
396          * receive buffers is, binding it to the key corresponding to the
397          * device's physical memory plus our peerid. */
398         if (lguest_bind_dma(peer_key(info,info->me), info->dma,
399                             NUM_SKBS, lgdev_irq(info->lgdev)) != 0)
400                 goto cleanup;
401         return 0;
402
403 cleanup:
404         while (--i >= 0)
405                 dev_kfree_skb(info->skb[i]);
406         return -ENOMEM;
407 }
408 /*:*/
409
410 /* The close routine is called when the device is no longer in use: we clean up
411  * elegantly. */
412 static int lguestnet_close(struct net_device *dev)
413 {
414         unsigned int i;
415         struct lguestnet_info *info = netdev_priv(dev);
416
417         /* Clear all trace of our existence out of the device memory by setting
418          * the slot which held our MAC address to 0 (unused). */
419         memset(&info->peer[info->me], 0, sizeof(info->peer[info->me]));
420
421         /* Unregister our array of receive buffers */
422         lguest_unbind_dma(peer_key(info, info->me), info->dma);
423         for (i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE(info->dma); i++)
424                 dev_kfree_skb(info->skb[i]);
425         return 0;
426 }
427
428 /*D:510 The network device probe function is basically a standard ethernet
429  * device setup.  It reads the "struct lguest_device_desc" and sets the "struct
430  * net_device".  Oh, the line-by-line excitement!  Let's skip over it. :*/
431 static int lguestnet_probe(struct lguest_device *lgdev)
432 {
433         int err, irqf = IRQF_SHARED;
434         struct net_device *dev;
435         struct lguestnet_info *info;
436         struct lguest_device_desc *desc = &lguest_devices[lgdev->index];
437
438         pr_debug("lguest_net: probing for device %i\n", lgdev->index);
439
440         dev = alloc_etherdev(sizeof(struct lguestnet_info));
441         if (!dev)
442                 return -ENOMEM;
443
444         SET_MODULE_OWNER(dev);
445
446         /* Ethernet defaults with some changes */
447         ether_setup(dev);
448         dev->set_mac_address = NULL;
449
450         dev->dev_addr[0] = 0x02; /* set local assignment bit (IEEE802) */
451         dev->dev_addr[1] = 0x00;
452         memcpy(&dev->dev_addr[2], &lguest_data.guestid, 2);
453         dev->dev_addr[4] = 0x00;
454         dev->dev_addr[5] = 0x00;
455
456         dev->open = lguestnet_open;
457         dev->stop = lguestnet_close;
458         dev->hard_start_xmit = lguestnet_start_xmit;
459
460         /* We don't actually support multicast yet, but turning on/off
461          * promisc also calls dev->set_multicast_list. */
462         dev->set_multicast_list = lguestnet_set_multicast;
463         SET_NETDEV_DEV(dev, &lgdev->dev);
464
465         /* The network code complains if you have "scatter-gather" capability
466          * if you don't also handle checksums (it seem that would be
467          * "illogical").  So we use a lie of omission and don't tell it that we
468          * can handle scattered packets unless we also don't want checksums,
469          * even though to us they're completely independent. */
470         if (desc->features & LGUEST_NET_F_NOCSUM)
471                 dev->features = NETIF_F_SG|NETIF_F_NO_CSUM;
472
473         info = netdev_priv(dev);
474         info->mapsize = PAGE_SIZE * desc->num_pages;
475         info->peer_phys = ((unsigned long)desc->pfn << PAGE_SHIFT);
476         info->lgdev = lgdev;
477         info->peer = lguest_map(info->peer_phys, desc->num_pages);
478         if (!info->peer) {
479                 err = -ENOMEM;
480                 goto free;
481         }
482
483         /* This stores our peerid (upper bits reserved for future). */
484         info->me = (desc->features & (info->mapsize-1));
485
486         err = register_netdev(dev);
487         if (err) {
488                 pr_debug("lguestnet: registering device failed\n");
489                 goto unmap;
490         }
491
492         if (lguest_devices[lgdev->index].features & LGUEST_DEVICE_F_RANDOMNESS)
493                 irqf |= IRQF_SAMPLE_RANDOM;
494         if (request_irq(lgdev_irq(lgdev), lguestnet_rcv, irqf, "lguestnet",
495                         dev) != 0) {
496                 pr_debug("lguestnet: cannot get irq %i\n", lgdev_irq(lgdev));
497                 goto unregister;
498         }
499
500         pr_debug("lguestnet: registered device %s\n", dev->name);
501         /* Finally, we put the "struct net_device" in the generic "struct
502          * lguest_device"s private pointer.  Again, it's not necessary, but
503          * makes sure the cool kernel kids don't tease us. */
504         lgdev->private = dev;
505         return 0;
506
507 unregister:
508         unregister_netdev(dev);
509 unmap:
510         lguest_unmap(info->peer);
511 free:
512         free_netdev(dev);
513         return err;
514 }
515
516 static struct lguest_driver lguestnet_drv = {
517         .name = "lguestnet",
518         .owner = THIS_MODULE,
519         .device_type = LGUEST_DEVICE_T_NET,
520         .probe = lguestnet_probe,
521 };
522
523 static __init int lguestnet_init(void)
524 {
525         return register_lguest_driver(&lguestnet_drv);
526 }
527 module_init(lguestnet_init);
528
529 MODULE_DESCRIPTION("Lguest network driver");
530 MODULE_LICENSE("GPL");
531
532 /*D:580
533  * This is the last of the Drivers, and with this we have covered the many and
534  * wonderous and fine (and boring) details of the Guest.
535  *
536  * "make Launcher" beckons, where we answer questions like "Where do Guests
537  * come from?", and "What do you do when someone asks for optimization?"
538  */