lguest: fix race in halt code
[linux-2.6.git] / drivers / lguest / core.c
1 /*P:400 This contains run_guest() which actually calls into the Host<->Guest
2  * Switcher and analyzes the return, such as determining if the Guest wants the
3  * Host to do something.  This file also contains useful helper routines. :*/
4 #include <linux/module.h>
5 #include <linux/stringify.h>
6 #include <linux/stddef.h>
7 #include <linux/io.h>
8 #include <linux/mm.h>
9 #include <linux/vmalloc.h>
10 #include <linux/cpu.h>
11 #include <linux/freezer.h>
12 #include <linux/highmem.h>
13 #include <asm/paravirt.h>
14 #include <asm/pgtable.h>
15 #include <asm/uaccess.h>
16 #include <asm/poll.h>
17 #include <asm/asm-offsets.h>
18 #include "lg.h"
19
20
21 static struct vm_struct *switcher_vma;
22 static struct page **switcher_page;
23
24 /* This One Big lock protects all inter-guest data structures. */
25 DEFINE_MUTEX(lguest_lock);
26
27 /*H:010 We need to set up the Switcher at a high virtual address.  Remember the
28  * Switcher is a few hundred bytes of assembler code which actually changes the
29  * CPU to run the Guest, and then changes back to the Host when a trap or
30  * interrupt happens.
31  *
32  * The Switcher code must be at the same virtual address in the Guest as the
33  * Host since it will be running as the switchover occurs.
34  *
35  * Trying to map memory at a particular address is an unusual thing to do, so
36  * it's not a simple one-liner. */
37 static __init int map_switcher(void)
38 {
39         int i, err;
40         struct page **pagep;
41
42         /*
43          * Map the Switcher in to high memory.
44          *
45          * It turns out that if we choose the address 0xFFC00000 (4MB under the
46          * top virtual address), it makes setting up the page tables really
47          * easy.
48          */
49
50         /* We allocate an array of struct page pointers.  map_vm_area() wants
51          * this, rather than just an array of pages. */
52         switcher_page = kmalloc(sizeof(switcher_page[0])*TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES,
53                                 GFP_KERNEL);
54         if (!switcher_page) {
55                 err = -ENOMEM;
56                 goto out;
57         }
58
59         /* Now we actually allocate the pages.  The Guest will see these pages,
60          * so we make sure they're zeroed. */
61         for (i = 0; i < TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES; i++) {
62                 unsigned long addr = get_zeroed_page(GFP_KERNEL);
63                 if (!addr) {
64                         err = -ENOMEM;
65                         goto free_some_pages;
66                 }
67                 switcher_page[i] = virt_to_page(addr);
68         }
69
70         /* First we check that the Switcher won't overlap the fixmap area at
71          * the top of memory.  It's currently nowhere near, but it could have
72          * very strange effects if it ever happened. */
73         if (SWITCHER_ADDR + (TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES+1)*PAGE_SIZE > FIXADDR_START){
74                 err = -ENOMEM;
75                 printk("lguest: mapping switcher would thwack fixmap\n");
76                 goto free_pages;
77         }
78
79         /* Now we reserve the "virtual memory area" we want: 0xFFC00000
80          * (SWITCHER_ADDR).  We might not get it in theory, but in practice
81          * it's worked so far.  The end address needs +1 because __get_vm_area
82          * allocates an extra guard page, so we need space for that. */
83         switcher_vma = __get_vm_area(TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES * PAGE_SIZE,
84                                      VM_ALLOC, SWITCHER_ADDR, SWITCHER_ADDR
85                                      + (TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES+1) * PAGE_SIZE);
86         if (!switcher_vma) {
87                 err = -ENOMEM;
88                 printk("lguest: could not map switcher pages high\n");
89                 goto free_pages;
90         }
91
92         /* This code actually sets up the pages we've allocated to appear at
93          * SWITCHER_ADDR.  map_vm_area() takes the vma we allocated above, the
94          * kind of pages we're mapping (kernel pages), and a pointer to our
95          * array of struct pages.  It increments that pointer, but we don't
96          * care. */
97         pagep = switcher_page;
98         err = map_vm_area(switcher_vma, PAGE_KERNEL, &pagep);
99         if (err) {
100                 printk("lguest: map_vm_area failed: %i\n", err);
101                 goto free_vma;
102         }
103
104         /* Now the Switcher is mapped at the right address, we can't fail!
105          * Copy in the compiled-in Switcher code (from <arch>_switcher.S). */
106         memcpy(switcher_vma->addr, start_switcher_text,
107                end_switcher_text - start_switcher_text);
108
109         printk(KERN_INFO "lguest: mapped switcher at %p\n",
110                switcher_vma->addr);
111         /* And we succeeded... */
112         return 0;
113
114 free_vma:
115         vunmap(switcher_vma->addr);
116 free_pages:
117         i = TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES;
118 free_some_pages:
119         for (--i; i >= 0; i--)
120                 __free_pages(switcher_page[i], 0);
121         kfree(switcher_page);
122 out:
123         return err;
124 }
125 /*:*/
126
127 /* Cleaning up the mapping when the module is unloaded is almost...
128  * too easy. */
129 static void unmap_switcher(void)
130 {
131         unsigned int i;
132
133         /* vunmap() undoes *both* map_vm_area() and __get_vm_area(). */
134         vunmap(switcher_vma->addr);
135         /* Now we just need to free the pages we copied the switcher into */
136         for (i = 0; i < TOTAL_SWITCHER_PAGES; i++)
137                 __free_pages(switcher_page[i], 0);
138         kfree(switcher_page);
139 }
140
141 /*H:032
142  * Dealing With Guest Memory.
143  *
144  * Before we go too much further into the Host, we need to grok the routines
145  * we use to deal with Guest memory.
146  *
147  * When the Guest gives us (what it thinks is) a physical address, we can use
148  * the normal copy_from_user() & copy_to_user() on the corresponding place in
149  * the memory region allocated by the Launcher.
150  *
151  * But we can't trust the Guest: it might be trying to access the Launcher
152  * code.  We have to check that the range is below the pfn_limit the Launcher
153  * gave us.  We have to make sure that addr + len doesn't give us a false
154  * positive by overflowing, too. */
155 bool lguest_address_ok(const struct lguest *lg,
156                        unsigned long addr, unsigned long len)
157 {
158         return (addr+len) / PAGE_SIZE < lg->pfn_limit && (addr+len >= addr);
159 }
160
161 /* This routine copies memory from the Guest.  Here we can see how useful the
162  * kill_lguest() routine we met in the Launcher can be: we return a random
163  * value (all zeroes) instead of needing to return an error. */
164 void __lgread(struct lg_cpu *cpu, void *b, unsigned long addr, unsigned bytes)
165 {
166         if (!lguest_address_ok(cpu->lg, addr, bytes)
167             || copy_from_user(b, cpu->lg->mem_base + addr, bytes) != 0) {
168                 /* copy_from_user should do this, but as we rely on it... */
169                 memset(b, 0, bytes);
170                 kill_guest(cpu, "bad read address %#lx len %u", addr, bytes);
171         }
172 }
173
174 /* This is the write (copy into Guest) version. */
175 void __lgwrite(struct lg_cpu *cpu, unsigned long addr, const void *b,
176                unsigned bytes)
177 {
178         if (!lguest_address_ok(cpu->lg, addr, bytes)
179             || copy_to_user(cpu->lg->mem_base + addr, b, bytes) != 0)
180                 kill_guest(cpu, "bad write address %#lx len %u", addr, bytes);
181 }
182 /*:*/
183
184 /*H:030 Let's jump straight to the the main loop which runs the Guest.
185  * Remember, this is called by the Launcher reading /dev/lguest, and we keep
186  * going around and around until something interesting happens. */
187 int run_guest(struct lg_cpu *cpu, unsigned long __user *user)
188 {
189         /* We stop running once the Guest is dead. */
190         while (!cpu->lg->dead) {
191                 unsigned int irq;
192
193                 /* First we run any hypercalls the Guest wants done. */
194                 if (cpu->hcall)
195                         do_hypercalls(cpu);
196
197                 /* It's possible the Guest did a NOTIFY hypercall to the
198                  * Launcher, in which case we return from the read() now. */
199                 if (cpu->pending_notify) {
200                         if (put_user(cpu->pending_notify, user))
201                                 return -EFAULT;
202                         return sizeof(cpu->pending_notify);
203                 }
204
205                 /* Check for signals */
206                 if (signal_pending(current))
207                         return -ERESTARTSYS;
208
209                 /* If Waker set break_out, return to Launcher. */
210                 if (cpu->break_out)
211                         return -EAGAIN;
212
213                 /* Check if there are any interrupts which can be delivered now:
214                  * if so, this sets up the hander to be executed when we next
215                  * run the Guest. */
216                 irq = interrupt_pending(cpu);
217                 if (irq < LGUEST_IRQS)
218                         try_deliver_interrupt(cpu, irq);
219
220                 /* All long-lived kernel loops need to check with this horrible
221                  * thing called the freezer.  If the Host is trying to suspend,
222                  * it stops us. */
223                 try_to_freeze();
224
225                 /* Just make absolutely sure the Guest is still alive.  One of
226                  * those hypercalls could have been fatal, for example. */
227                 if (cpu->lg->dead)
228                         break;
229
230                 /* If the Guest asked to be stopped, we sleep.  The Guest's
231                  * clock timer or LHREQ_BREAK from the Waker will wake us. */
232                 if (cpu->halted) {
233                         set_current_state(TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE);
234                         /* Just before we sleep, make sure nothing snuck in
235                          * which we should be doing. */
236                         if (interrupt_pending(cpu) < LGUEST_IRQS
237                             || cpu->break_out)
238                                 set_current_state(TASK_RUNNING);
239                         else
240                                 schedule();
241                         continue;
242                 }
243
244                 /* OK, now we're ready to jump into the Guest.  First we put up
245                  * the "Do Not Disturb" sign: */
246                 local_irq_disable();
247
248                 /* Actually run the Guest until something happens. */
249                 lguest_arch_run_guest(cpu);
250
251                 /* Now we're ready to be interrupted or moved to other CPUs */
252                 local_irq_enable();
253
254                 /* Now we deal with whatever happened to the Guest. */
255                 lguest_arch_handle_trap(cpu);
256         }
257
258         /* Special case: Guest is 'dead' but wants a reboot. */
259         if (cpu->lg->dead == ERR_PTR(-ERESTART))
260                 return -ERESTART;
261
262         /* The Guest is dead => "No such file or directory" */
263         return -ENOENT;
264 }
265
266 /*H:000
267  * Welcome to the Host!
268  *
269  * By this point your brain has been tickled by the Guest code and numbed by
270  * the Launcher code; prepare for it to be stretched by the Host code.  This is
271  * the heart.  Let's begin at the initialization routine for the Host's lg
272  * module.
273  */
274 static int __init init(void)
275 {
276         int err;
277
278         /* Lguest can't run under Xen, VMI or itself.  It does Tricky Stuff. */
279         if (paravirt_enabled()) {
280                 printk("lguest is afraid of being a guest\n");
281                 return -EPERM;
282         }
283
284         /* First we put the Switcher up in very high virtual memory. */
285         err = map_switcher();
286         if (err)
287                 goto out;
288
289         /* Now we set up the pagetable implementation for the Guests. */
290         err = init_pagetables(switcher_page, SHARED_SWITCHER_PAGES);
291         if (err)
292                 goto unmap;
293
294         /* We might need to reserve an interrupt vector. */
295         err = init_interrupts();
296         if (err)
297                 goto free_pgtables;
298
299         /* /dev/lguest needs to be registered. */
300         err = lguest_device_init();
301         if (err)
302                 goto free_interrupts;
303
304         /* Finally we do some architecture-specific setup. */
305         lguest_arch_host_init();
306
307         /* All good! */
308         return 0;
309
310 free_interrupts:
311         free_interrupts();
312 free_pgtables:
313         free_pagetables();
314 unmap:
315         unmap_switcher();
316 out:
317         return err;
318 }
319
320 /* Cleaning up is just the same code, backwards.  With a little French. */
321 static void __exit fini(void)
322 {
323         lguest_device_remove();
324         free_interrupts();
325         free_pagetables();
326         unmap_switcher();
327
328         lguest_arch_host_fini();
329 }
330 /*:*/
331
332 /* The Host side of lguest can be a module.  This is a nice way for people to
333  * play with it.  */
334 module_init(init);
335 module_exit(fini);
336 MODULE_LICENSE("GPL");
337 MODULE_AUTHOR("Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au>");