Fix typos in /Documentation : 'T''
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / watchdog / watchdog-api.txt
1 The Linux Watchdog driver API.
2
3 Copyright 2002 Christer Weingel <wingel@nano-system.com>
4
5 Some parts of this document are copied verbatim from the sbc60xxwdt
6 driver which is (c) Copyright 2000 Jakob Oestergaard <jakob@ostenfeld.dk>
7
8 This document describes the state of the Linux 2.4.18 kernel.
9
10 Introduction:
11
12 A Watchdog Timer (WDT) is a hardware circuit that can reset the
13 computer system in case of a software fault.  You probably knew that
14 already.
15
16 Usually a userspace daemon will notify the kernel watchdog driver via the
17 /dev/watchdog special device file that userspace is still alive, at
18 regular intervals.  When such a notification occurs, the driver will
19 usually tell the hardware watchdog that everything is in order, and
20 that the watchdog should wait for yet another little while to reset
21 the system.  If userspace fails (RAM error, kernel bug, whatever), the
22 notifications cease to occur, and the hardware watchdog will reset the
23 system (causing a reboot) after the timeout occurs.
24
25 The Linux watchdog API is a rather AD hoc construction and different
26 drivers implement different, and sometimes incompatible, parts of it.
27 This file is an attempt to document the existing usage and allow
28 future driver writers to use it as a reference.
29
30 The simplest API:
31
32 All drivers support the basic mode of operation, where the watchdog
33 activates as soon as /dev/watchdog is opened and will reboot unless
34 the watchdog is pinged within a certain time, this time is called the
35 timeout or margin.  The simplest way to ping the watchdog is to write
36 some data to the device.  So a very simple watchdog daemon would look
37 like this source file:  see Documentation/watchdog/src/watchdog-simple.c
38
39 A more advanced driver could for example check that a HTTP server is
40 still responding before doing the write call to ping the watchdog.
41
42 When the device is closed, the watchdog is disabled.  This is not
43 always such a good idea, since if there is a bug in the watchdog
44 daemon and it crashes the system will not reboot.  Because of this,
45 some of the drivers support the configuration option "Disable watchdog
46 shutdown on close", CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT.  If it is set to Y when
47 compiling the kernel, there is no way of disabling the watchdog once
48 it has been started.  So, if the watchdog daemon crashes, the system
49 will reboot after the timeout has passed.
50
51 Some other drivers will not disable the watchdog, unless a specific
52 magic character 'V' has been sent /dev/watchdog just before closing
53 the file.  If the userspace daemon closes the file without sending
54 this special character, the driver will assume that the daemon (and
55 userspace in general) died, and will stop pinging the watchdog without
56 disabling it first.  This will then cause a reboot.
57
58 The ioctl API:
59
60 All conforming drivers also support an ioctl API.
61
62 Pinging the watchdog using an ioctl:
63
64 All drivers that have an ioctl interface support at least one ioctl,
65 KEEPALIVE.  This ioctl does exactly the same thing as a write to the
66 watchdog device, so the main loop in the above program could be
67 replaced with:
68
69         while (1) {
70                 ioctl(fd, WDIOC_KEEPALIVE, 0);
71                 sleep(10);
72         }
73
74 the argument to the ioctl is ignored.
75
76 Setting and getting the timeout:
77
78 For some drivers it is possible to modify the watchdog timeout on the
79 fly with the SETTIMEOUT ioctl, those drivers have the WDIOF_SETTIMEOUT
80 flag set in their option field.  The argument is an integer
81 representing the timeout in seconds.  The driver returns the real
82 timeout used in the same variable, and this timeout might differ from
83 the requested one due to limitation of the hardware.
84
85     int timeout = 45;
86     ioctl(fd, WDIOC_SETTIMEOUT, &timeout);
87     printf("The timeout was set to %d seconds\n", timeout);
88
89 This example might actually print "The timeout was set to 60 seconds"
90 if the device has a granularity of minutes for its timeout.
91
92 Starting with the Linux 2.4.18 kernel, it is possible to query the
93 current timeout using the GETTIMEOUT ioctl.
94
95     ioctl(fd, WDIOC_GETTIMEOUT, &timeout);
96     printf("The timeout was is %d seconds\n", timeout);
97
98 Pretimeouts:
99
100 Some watchdog timers can be set to have a trigger go off before the
101 actual time they will reset the system.  This can be done with an NMI,
102 interrupt, or other mechanism.  This allows Linux to record useful
103 information (like panic information and kernel coredumps) before it
104 resets.
105
106     pretimeout = 10;
107     ioctl(fd, WDIOC_SETPRETIMEOUT, &pretimeout);
108
109 Note that the pretimeout is the number of seconds before the time
110 when the timeout will go off.  It is not the number of seconds until
111 the pretimeout.  So, for instance, if you set the timeout to 60 seconds
112 and the pretimeout to 10 seconds, the pretimout will go of in 50
113 seconds.  Setting a pretimeout to zero disables it.
114
115 There is also a get function for getting the pretimeout:
116
117     ioctl(fd, WDIOC_GETPRETIMEOUT, &timeout);
118     printf("The pretimeout was is %d seconds\n", timeout);
119
120 Not all watchdog drivers will support a pretimeout.
121
122 Get the number of seconds before reboot:
123
124 Some watchdog drivers have the ability to report the remaining time
125 before the system will reboot. The WDIOC_GETTIMELEFT is the ioctl
126 that returns the number of seconds before reboot.
127
128     ioctl(fd, WDIOC_GETTIMELEFT, &timeleft);
129     printf("The timeout was is %d seconds\n", timeleft);
130
131 Environmental monitoring:
132
133 All watchdog drivers are required return more information about the system,
134 some do temperature, fan and power level monitoring, some can tell you
135 the reason for the last reboot of the system.  The GETSUPPORT ioctl is
136 available to ask what the device can do:
137
138         struct watchdog_info ident;
139         ioctl(fd, WDIOC_GETSUPPORT, &ident);
140
141 the fields returned in the ident struct are:
142
143         identity                a string identifying the watchdog driver
144         firmware_version        the firmware version of the card if available
145         options                 a flags describing what the device supports
146
147 the options field can have the following bits set, and describes what
148 kind of information that the GET_STATUS and GET_BOOT_STATUS ioctls can
149 return.   [FIXME -- Is this correct?]
150
151         WDIOF_OVERHEAT          Reset due to CPU overheat
152
153 The machine was last rebooted by the watchdog because the thermal limit was
154 exceeded
155
156         WDIOF_FANFAULT          Fan failed
157
158 A system fan monitored by the watchdog card has failed
159
160         WDIOF_EXTERN1           External relay 1
161
162 External monitoring relay/source 1 was triggered. Controllers intended for
163 real world applications include external monitoring pins that will trigger
164 a reset.
165
166         WDIOF_EXTERN2           External relay 2
167
168 External monitoring relay/source 2 was triggered
169
170         WDIOF_POWERUNDER        Power bad/power fault
171
172 The machine is showing an undervoltage status
173
174         WDIOF_CARDRESET         Card previously reset the CPU
175
176 The last reboot was caused by the watchdog card
177
178         WDIOF_POWEROVER         Power over voltage
179
180 The machine is showing an overvoltage status. Note that if one level is
181 under and one over both bits will be set - this may seem odd but makes
182 sense.
183
184         WDIOF_KEEPALIVEPING     Keep alive ping reply
185
186 The watchdog saw a keepalive ping since it was last queried.
187
188         WDIOF_SETTIMEOUT        Can set/get the timeout
189
190 The watchdog can do pretimeouts.
191
192         WDIOF_PRETIMEOUT        Pretimeout (in seconds), get/set
193
194
195 For those drivers that return any bits set in the option field, the
196 GETSTATUS and GETBOOTSTATUS ioctls can be used to ask for the current
197 status, and the status at the last reboot, respectively.  
198
199     int flags;
200     ioctl(fd, WDIOC_GETSTATUS, &flags);
201
202     or
203
204     ioctl(fd, WDIOC_GETBOOTSTATUS, &flags);
205
206 Note that not all devices support these two calls, and some only
207 support the GETBOOTSTATUS call.
208
209 Some drivers can measure the temperature using the GETTEMP ioctl.  The
210 returned value is the temperature in degrees fahrenheit.
211
212     int temperature;
213     ioctl(fd, WDIOC_GETTEMP, &temperature);
214
215 Finally the SETOPTIONS ioctl can be used to control some aspects of
216 the cards operation; right now the pcwd driver is the only one
217 supporting this ioctl.
218
219     int options = 0;
220     ioctl(fd, WDIOC_SETOPTIONS, options);
221
222 The following options are available:
223
224         WDIOS_DISABLECARD       Turn off the watchdog timer
225         WDIOS_ENABLECARD        Turn on the watchdog timer
226         WDIOS_TEMPPANIC         Kernel panic on temperature trip
227
228 [FIXME -- better explanations]
229
230 Implementations in the current drivers in the kernel tree:
231
232 Here I have tried to summarize what the different drivers support and
233 where they do strange things compared to the other drivers.
234
235 acquirewdt.c -- Acquire Single Board Computer
236
237         This driver has a hardcoded timeout of 1 minute
238
239         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
240
241         GETSUPPORT returns KEEPALIVEPING.  GETSTATUS will return 1 if
242         the device is open, 0 if not.  [FIXME -- isn't this rather
243         silly?  To be able to use the ioctl, the device must be open
244         and so GETSTATUS will always return 1].
245
246 advantechwdt.c -- Advantech Single Board Computer
247
248         Timeout that defaults to 60 seconds, supports SETTIMEOUT.
249
250         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
251
252         GETSUPPORT returns WDIOF_KEEPALIVEPING and WDIOF_SETTIMEOUT.
253         The GETSTATUS call returns if the device is open or not.
254         [FIXME -- silliness again?]
255         
256 booke_wdt.c -- PowerPC BookE Watchdog Timer
257
258         Timeout default varies according to frequency, supports
259         SETTIMEOUT
260
261         Watchdog cannot be turned off, CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
262         does not make sense
263
264         GETSUPPORT returns the watchdog_info struct, and
265         GETSTATUS returns the supported options. GETBOOTSTATUS
266         returns a 1 if the last reset was caused by the
267         watchdog and a 0 otherwise. This watchdog cannot be
268         disabled once it has been started. The wdt_period kernel
269         parameter selects which bit of the time base changing
270         from 0->1 will trigger the watchdog exception. Changing
271         the timeout from the ioctl calls will change the
272         wdt_period as defined above. Finally if you would like to
273         replace the default Watchdog Handler you can implement the
274         WatchdogHandler() function in your own code.
275
276 eurotechwdt.c -- Eurotech CPU-1220/1410
277
278         The timeout can be set using the SETTIMEOUT ioctl and defaults
279         to 60 seconds.
280
281         Also has a module parameter "ev", event type which controls
282         what should happen on a timeout, the string "int" or anything
283         else that causes a reboot.  [FIXME -- better description]
284
285         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
286
287         GETSUPPORT returns CARDRESET and WDIOF_SETTIMEOUT but
288         GETSTATUS is not supported and GETBOOTSTATUS just returns 0.
289
290 i810-tco.c -- Intel 810 chipset
291
292         Also has support for a lot of other i8x0 stuff, but the
293         watchdog is one of the things.
294
295         The timeout is set using the module parameter "i810_margin",
296         which is in steps of 0.6 seconds where 2<i810_margin<64.  The
297         driver supports the SETTIMEOUT ioctl.
298
299         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT.
300
301         GETSUPPORT returns WDIOF_SETTIMEOUT.  The GETSTATUS call
302         returns some kind of timer value which ist not compatible with
303         the other drivers.  GETBOOT status returns some kind of
304         hardware specific boot status.  [FIXME -- describe this]
305
306 ib700wdt.c -- IB700 Single Board Computer
307
308         Default timeout of 30 seconds and the timeout is settable
309         using the SETTIMEOUT ioctl.  Note that only a few timeout
310         values are supported.
311
312         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
313
314         GETSUPPORT returns WDIOF_KEEPALIVEPING and WDIOF_SETTIMEOUT.
315         The GETSTATUS call returns if the device is open or not.
316         [FIXME -- silliness again?]
317
318 machzwd.c -- MachZ ZF-Logic
319
320         Hardcoded timeout of 10 seconds
321
322         Has a module parameter "action" that controls what happens
323         when the timeout runs out which can be 0 = RESET (default), 
324         1 = SMI, 2 = NMI, 3 = SCI.
325
326         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT and the magic character
327         'V' close handling.
328
329         GETSUPPORT returns WDIOF_KEEPALIVEPING, and the GETSTATUS call
330         returns if the device is open or not.  [FIXME -- silliness
331         again?]
332
333 mixcomwd.c -- MixCom Watchdog
334
335         [FIXME -- I'm unable to tell what the timeout is]
336
337         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
338
339         GETSUPPORT returns WDIOF_KEEPALIVEPING, GETSTATUS returns if
340         the device is opened or not [FIXME -- I'm not really sure how
341         this works, there seems to be some magic connected to
342         CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT]
343
344 pcwd.c -- Berkshire PC Watchdog
345
346         Hardcoded timeout of 1.5 seconds
347
348         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
349
350         GETSUPPORT returns WDIOF_OVERHEAT|WDIOF_CARDRESET and both
351         GETSTATUS and GETBOOTSTATUS return something useful.
352
353         The SETOPTIONS call can be used to enable and disable the card
354         and to ask the driver to call panic if the system overheats.
355
356 sbc60xxwdt.c -- 60xx Single Board Computer
357
358         Hardcoded timeout of 10 seconds
359
360         Does not support CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT, but has the magic
361         character 'V' close handling.
362
363         No bits set in GETSUPPORT
364
365 scx200.c -- National SCx200 CPUs
366
367         Not in the kernel yet.
368
369         The timeout is set using a module parameter "margin" which
370         defaults to 60 seconds.  The timeout can also be set using
371         SETTIMEOUT and read using GETTIMEOUT.
372
373         Supports a module parameter "nowayout" that is initialized
374         with the value of CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT.  Also supports the
375         magic character 'V' handling.
376
377 shwdt.c -- SuperH 3/4 processors
378
379         [FIXME -- I'm unable to tell what the timeout is]
380
381         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
382
383         GETSUPPORT returns WDIOF_KEEPALIVEPING, and the GETSTATUS call
384         returns if the device is open or not.  [FIXME -- silliness
385         again?]
386
387 softdog.c -- Software watchdog
388
389         The timeout is set with the module parameter "soft_margin"
390         which defaults to 60 seconds, the timeout is also settable
391         using the SETTIMEOUT ioctl.
392
393         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
394
395         WDIOF_SETTIMEOUT bit set in GETSUPPORT
396
397 w83877f_wdt.c -- W83877F Computer
398
399         Hardcoded timeout of 30 seconds
400
401         Does not support CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT, but has the magic
402         character 'V' close handling.
403
404         No bits set in GETSUPPORT
405
406 w83627hf_wdt.c -- w83627hf watchdog
407
408         Timeout that defaults to 60 seconds, supports SETTIMEOUT.
409
410         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
411
412         GETSUPPORT returns WDIOF_KEEPALIVEPING and WDIOF_SETTIMEOUT.
413         The GETSTATUS call returns if the device is open or not.
414
415 wdt.c -- ICS WDT500/501 ISA and
416 wdt_pci.c -- ICS WDT500/501 PCI
417
418         Default timeout of 60 seconds.  The timeout is also settable
419         using the SETTIMEOUT ioctl.
420
421         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
422
423         GETSUPPORT returns with bits set depending on the actual
424         card. The WDT501 supports a lot of external monitoring, the
425         WDT500 much less.
426
427 wdt285.c -- Footbridge watchdog
428
429         The timeout is set with the module parameter "soft_margin"
430         which defaults to 60 seconds.  The timeout is also settable
431         using the SETTIMEOUT ioctl.
432
433         Does not support CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
434
435         WDIOF_SETTIMEOUT bit set in GETSUPPORT
436
437 wdt977.c -- Netwinder W83977AF chip
438
439         Hardcoded timeout of 3 minutes
440
441         Supports CONFIG_WATCHDOG_NOWAYOUT
442
443         Does not support any ioctls at all.
444