oom: add oom_kill_allocating_task sysctl
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / sysctl / vm.txt
1 Documentation for /proc/sys/vm/*        kernel version 2.2.10
2         (c) 1998, 1999,  Rik van Riel <riel@nl.linux.org>
3
4 For general info and legal blurb, please look in README.
5
6 ==============================================================
7
8 This file contains the documentation for the sysctl files in
9 /proc/sys/vm and is valid for Linux kernel version 2.2.
10
11 The files in this directory can be used to tune the operation
12 of the virtual memory (VM) subsystem of the Linux kernel and
13 the writeout of dirty data to disk.
14
15 Default values and initialization routines for most of these
16 files can be found in mm/swap.c.
17
18 Currently, these files are in /proc/sys/vm:
19 - overcommit_memory
20 - page-cluster
21 - dirty_ratio
22 - dirty_background_ratio
23 - dirty_expire_centisecs
24 - dirty_writeback_centisecs
25 - max_map_count
26 - min_free_kbytes
27 - laptop_mode
28 - block_dump
29 - drop-caches
30 - zone_reclaim_mode
31 - min_unmapped_ratio
32 - min_slab_ratio
33 - panic_on_oom
34 - oom_kill_allocating_task
35 - mmap_min_address
36 - numa_zonelist_order
37
38 ==============================================================
39
40 dirty_ratio, dirty_background_ratio, dirty_expire_centisecs,
41 dirty_writeback_centisecs, vfs_cache_pressure, laptop_mode,
42 block_dump, swap_token_timeout, drop-caches,
43 hugepages_treat_as_movable:
44
45 See Documentation/filesystems/proc.txt
46
47 ==============================================================
48
49 overcommit_memory:
50
51 This value contains a flag that enables memory overcommitment.
52
53 When this flag is 0, the kernel attempts to estimate the amount
54 of free memory left when userspace requests more memory.
55
56 When this flag is 1, the kernel pretends there is always enough
57 memory until it actually runs out.
58
59 When this flag is 2, the kernel uses a "never overcommit"
60 policy that attempts to prevent any overcommit of memory.  
61
62 This feature can be very useful because there are a lot of
63 programs that malloc() huge amounts of memory "just-in-case"
64 and don't use much of it.
65
66 The default value is 0.
67
68 See Documentation/vm/overcommit-accounting and
69 security/commoncap.c::cap_vm_enough_memory() for more information.
70
71 ==============================================================
72
73 overcommit_ratio:
74
75 When overcommit_memory is set to 2, the committed address
76 space is not permitted to exceed swap plus this percentage
77 of physical RAM.  See above.
78
79 ==============================================================
80
81 page-cluster:
82
83 The Linux VM subsystem avoids excessive disk seeks by reading
84 multiple pages on a page fault. The number of pages it reads
85 is dependent on the amount of memory in your machine.
86
87 The number of pages the kernel reads in at once is equal to
88 2 ^ page-cluster. Values above 2 ^ 5 don't make much sense
89 for swap because we only cluster swap data in 32-page groups.
90
91 ==============================================================
92
93 max_map_count:
94
95 This file contains the maximum number of memory map areas a process
96 may have. Memory map areas are used as a side-effect of calling
97 malloc, directly by mmap and mprotect, and also when loading shared
98 libraries.
99
100 While most applications need less than a thousand maps, certain
101 programs, particularly malloc debuggers, may consume lots of them,
102 e.g., up to one or two maps per allocation.
103
104 The default value is 65536.
105
106 ==============================================================
107
108 min_free_kbytes:
109
110 This is used to force the Linux VM to keep a minimum number 
111 of kilobytes free.  The VM uses this number to compute a pages_min
112 value for each lowmem zone in the system.  Each lowmem zone gets 
113 a number of reserved free pages based proportionally on its size.
114
115 ==============================================================
116
117 percpu_pagelist_fraction
118
119 This is the fraction of pages at most (high mark pcp->high) in each zone that
120 are allocated for each per cpu page list.  The min value for this is 8.  It
121 means that we don't allow more than 1/8th of pages in each zone to be
122 allocated in any single per_cpu_pagelist.  This entry only changes the value
123 of hot per cpu pagelists.  User can specify a number like 100 to allocate
124 1/100th of each zone to each per cpu page list.
125
126 The batch value of each per cpu pagelist is also updated as a result.  It is
127 set to pcp->high/4.  The upper limit of batch is (PAGE_SHIFT * 8)
128
129 The initial value is zero.  Kernel does not use this value at boot time to set
130 the high water marks for each per cpu page list.
131
132 ===============================================================
133
134 zone_reclaim_mode:
135
136 Zone_reclaim_mode allows someone to set more or less aggressive approaches to
137 reclaim memory when a zone runs out of memory. If it is set to zero then no
138 zone reclaim occurs. Allocations will be satisfied from other zones / nodes
139 in the system.
140
141 This is value ORed together of
142
143 1       = Zone reclaim on
144 2       = Zone reclaim writes dirty pages out
145 4       = Zone reclaim swaps pages
146
147 zone_reclaim_mode is set during bootup to 1 if it is determined that pages
148 from remote zones will cause a measurable performance reduction. The
149 page allocator will then reclaim easily reusable pages (those page
150 cache pages that are currently not used) before allocating off node pages.
151
152 It may be beneficial to switch off zone reclaim if the system is
153 used for a file server and all of memory should be used for caching files
154 from disk. In that case the caching effect is more important than
155 data locality.
156
157 Allowing zone reclaim to write out pages stops processes that are
158 writing large amounts of data from dirtying pages on other nodes. Zone
159 reclaim will write out dirty pages if a zone fills up and so effectively
160 throttle the process. This may decrease the performance of a single process
161 since it cannot use all of system memory to buffer the outgoing writes
162 anymore but it preserve the memory on other nodes so that the performance
163 of other processes running on other nodes will not be affected.
164
165 Allowing regular swap effectively restricts allocations to the local
166 node unless explicitly overridden by memory policies or cpuset
167 configurations.
168
169 =============================================================
170
171 min_unmapped_ratio:
172
173 This is available only on NUMA kernels.
174
175 A percentage of the total pages in each zone.  Zone reclaim will only
176 occur if more than this percentage of pages are file backed and unmapped.
177 This is to insure that a minimal amount of local pages is still available for
178 file I/O even if the node is overallocated.
179
180 The default is 1 percent.
181
182 =============================================================
183
184 min_slab_ratio:
185
186 This is available only on NUMA kernels.
187
188 A percentage of the total pages in each zone.  On Zone reclaim
189 (fallback from the local zone occurs) slabs will be reclaimed if more
190 than this percentage of pages in a zone are reclaimable slab pages.
191 This insures that the slab growth stays under control even in NUMA
192 systems that rarely perform global reclaim.
193
194 The default is 5 percent.
195
196 Note that slab reclaim is triggered in a per zone / node fashion.
197 The process of reclaiming slab memory is currently not node specific
198 and may not be fast.
199
200 =============================================================
201
202 panic_on_oom
203
204 This enables or disables panic on out-of-memory feature.
205
206 If this is set to 0, the kernel will kill some rogue process,
207 called oom_killer.  Usually, oom_killer can kill rogue processes and
208 system will survive.
209
210 If this is set to 1, the kernel panics when out-of-memory happens.
211 However, if a process limits using nodes by mempolicy/cpusets,
212 and those nodes become memory exhaustion status, one process
213 may be killed by oom-killer. No panic occurs in this case.
214 Because other nodes' memory may be free. This means system total status
215 may be not fatal yet.
216
217 If this is set to 2, the kernel panics compulsorily even on the
218 above-mentioned.
219
220 The default value is 0.
221 1 and 2 are for failover of clustering. Please select either
222 according to your policy of failover.
223
224 =============================================================
225
226 oom_kill_allocating_task
227
228 This enables or disables killing the OOM-triggering task in
229 out-of-memory situations.
230
231 If this is set to zero, the OOM killer will scan through the entire
232 tasklist and select a task based on heuristics to kill.  This normally
233 selects a rogue memory-hogging task that frees up a large amount of
234 memory when killed.
235
236 If this is set to non-zero, the OOM killer simply kills the task that
237 triggered the out-of-memory condition.  This avoids the expensive
238 tasklist scan.
239
240 If panic_on_oom is selected, it takes precedence over whatever value
241 is used in oom_kill_allocating_task.
242
243 The default value is 0.
244
245 ==============================================================
246
247 mmap_min_addr
248
249 This file indicates the amount of address space  which a user process will
250 be restricted from mmaping.  Since kernel null dereference bugs could
251 accidentally operate based on the information in the first couple of pages
252 of memory userspace processes should not be allowed to write to them.  By
253 default this value is set to 0 and no protections will be enforced by the
254 security module.  Setting this value to something like 64k will allow the
255 vast majority of applications to work correctly and provide defense in depth
256 against future potential kernel bugs.
257
258 ==============================================================
259
260 numa_zonelist_order
261
262 This sysctl is only for NUMA.
263 'where the memory is allocated from' is controlled by zonelists.
264 (This documentation ignores ZONE_HIGHMEM/ZONE_DMA32 for simple explanation.
265  you may be able to read ZONE_DMA as ZONE_DMA32...)
266
267 In non-NUMA case, a zonelist for GFP_KERNEL is ordered as following.
268 ZONE_NORMAL -> ZONE_DMA
269 This means that a memory allocation request for GFP_KERNEL will
270 get memory from ZONE_DMA only when ZONE_NORMAL is not available.
271
272 In NUMA case, you can think of following 2 types of order.
273 Assume 2 node NUMA and below is zonelist of Node(0)'s GFP_KERNEL
274
275 (A) Node(0) ZONE_NORMAL -> Node(0) ZONE_DMA -> Node(1) ZONE_NORMAL
276 (B) Node(0) ZONE_NORMAL -> Node(1) ZONE_NORMAL -> Node(0) ZONE_DMA.
277
278 Type(A) offers the best locality for processes on Node(0), but ZONE_DMA
279 will be used before ZONE_NORMAL exhaustion. This increases possibility of
280 out-of-memory(OOM) of ZONE_DMA because ZONE_DMA is tend to be small.
281
282 Type(B) cannot offer the best locality but is more robust against OOM of
283 the DMA zone.
284
285 Type(A) is called as "Node" order. Type (B) is "Zone" order.
286
287 "Node order" orders the zonelists by node, then by zone within each node.
288 Specify "[Nn]ode" for zone order
289
290 "Zone Order" orders the zonelists by zone type, then by node within each
291 zone.  Specify "[Zz]one"for zode order.
292
293 Specify "[Dd]efault" to request automatic configuration.  Autoconfiguration
294 will select "node" order in following case.
295 (1) if the DMA zone does not exist or
296 (2) if the DMA zone comprises greater than 50% of the available memory or
297 (3) if any node's DMA zone comprises greater than 60% of its local memory and
298     the amount of local memory is big enough.
299
300 Otherwise, "zone" order will be selected. Default order is recommended unless
301 this is causing problems for your system/application.