page allocator: use allocation flags as an index to the zone watermark
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / sysctl / vm.txt
1 Documentation for /proc/sys/vm/*        kernel version 2.6.29
2         (c) 1998, 1999,  Rik van Riel <riel@nl.linux.org>
3         (c) 2008         Peter W. Morreale <pmorreale@novell.com>
4
5 For general info and legal blurb, please look in README.
6
7 ==============================================================
8
9 This file contains the documentation for the sysctl files in
10 /proc/sys/vm and is valid for Linux kernel version 2.6.29.
11
12 The files in this directory can be used to tune the operation
13 of the virtual memory (VM) subsystem of the Linux kernel and
14 the writeout of dirty data to disk.
15
16 Default values and initialization routines for most of these
17 files can be found in mm/swap.c.
18
19 Currently, these files are in /proc/sys/vm:
20
21 - block_dump
22 - dirty_background_bytes
23 - dirty_background_ratio
24 - dirty_bytes
25 - dirty_expire_centisecs
26 - dirty_ratio
27 - dirty_writeback_centisecs
28 - drop_caches
29 - hugepages_treat_as_movable
30 - hugetlb_shm_group
31 - laptop_mode
32 - legacy_va_layout
33 - lowmem_reserve_ratio
34 - max_map_count
35 - min_free_kbytes
36 - min_slab_ratio
37 - min_unmapped_ratio
38 - mmap_min_addr
39 - nr_hugepages
40 - nr_overcommit_hugepages
41 - nr_pdflush_threads
42 - nr_trim_pages         (only if CONFIG_MMU=n)
43 - numa_zonelist_order
44 - oom_dump_tasks
45 - oom_kill_allocating_task
46 - overcommit_memory
47 - overcommit_ratio
48 - page-cluster
49 - panic_on_oom
50 - percpu_pagelist_fraction
51 - stat_interval
52 - swappiness
53 - vfs_cache_pressure
54 - zone_reclaim_mode
55
56
57 ==============================================================
58
59 block_dump
60
61 block_dump enables block I/O debugging when set to a nonzero value. More
62 information on block I/O debugging is in Documentation/laptops/laptop-mode.txt.
63
64 ==============================================================
65
66 dirty_background_bytes
67
68 Contains the amount of dirty memory at which the pdflush background writeback
69 daemon will start writeback.
70
71 If dirty_background_bytes is written, dirty_background_ratio becomes a function
72 of its value (dirty_background_bytes / the amount of dirtyable system memory).
73
74 ==============================================================
75
76 dirty_background_ratio
77
78 Contains, as a percentage of total system memory, the number of pages at which
79 the pdflush background writeback daemon will start writing out dirty data.
80
81 ==============================================================
82
83 dirty_bytes
84
85 Contains the amount of dirty memory at which a process generating disk writes
86 will itself start writeback.
87
88 If dirty_bytes is written, dirty_ratio becomes a function of its value
89 (dirty_bytes / the amount of dirtyable system memory).
90
91 Note: the minimum value allowed for dirty_bytes is two pages (in bytes); any
92 value lower than this limit will be ignored and the old configuration will be
93 retained.
94
95 ==============================================================
96
97 dirty_expire_centisecs
98
99 This tunable is used to define when dirty data is old enough to be eligible
100 for writeout by the pdflush daemons.  It is expressed in 100'ths of a second.
101 Data which has been dirty in-memory for longer than this interval will be
102 written out next time a pdflush daemon wakes up.
103
104 ==============================================================
105
106 dirty_ratio
107
108 Contains, as a percentage of total system memory, the number of pages at which
109 a process which is generating disk writes will itself start writing out dirty
110 data.
111
112 ==============================================================
113
114 dirty_writeback_centisecs
115
116 The pdflush writeback daemons will periodically wake up and write `old' data
117 out to disk.  This tunable expresses the interval between those wakeups, in
118 100'ths of a second.
119
120 Setting this to zero disables periodic writeback altogether.
121
122 ==============================================================
123
124 drop_caches
125
126 Writing to this will cause the kernel to drop clean caches, dentries and
127 inodes from memory, causing that memory to become free.
128
129 To free pagecache:
130         echo 1 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches
131 To free dentries and inodes:
132         echo 2 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches
133 To free pagecache, dentries and inodes:
134         echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches
135
136 As this is a non-destructive operation and dirty objects are not freeable, the
137 user should run `sync' first.
138
139 ==============================================================
140
141 hugepages_treat_as_movable
142
143 This parameter is only useful when kernelcore= is specified at boot time to
144 create ZONE_MOVABLE for pages that may be reclaimed or migrated. Huge pages
145 are not movable so are not normally allocated from ZONE_MOVABLE. A non-zero
146 value written to hugepages_treat_as_movable allows huge pages to be allocated
147 from ZONE_MOVABLE.
148
149 Once enabled, the ZONE_MOVABLE is treated as an area of memory the huge
150 pages pool can easily grow or shrink within. Assuming that applications are
151 not running that mlock() a lot of memory, it is likely the huge pages pool
152 can grow to the size of ZONE_MOVABLE by repeatedly entering the desired value
153 into nr_hugepages and triggering page reclaim.
154
155 ==============================================================
156
157 hugetlb_shm_group
158
159 hugetlb_shm_group contains group id that is allowed to create SysV
160 shared memory segment using hugetlb page.
161
162 ==============================================================
163
164 laptop_mode
165
166 laptop_mode is a knob that controls "laptop mode". All the things that are
167 controlled by this knob are discussed in Documentation/laptops/laptop-mode.txt.
168
169 ==============================================================
170
171 legacy_va_layout
172
173 If non-zero, this sysctl disables the new 32-bit mmap mmap layout - the kernel
174 will use the legacy (2.4) layout for all processes.
175
176 ==============================================================
177
178 lowmem_reserve_ratio
179
180 For some specialised workloads on highmem machines it is dangerous for
181 the kernel to allow process memory to be allocated from the "lowmem"
182 zone.  This is because that memory could then be pinned via the mlock()
183 system call, or by unavailability of swapspace.
184
185 And on large highmem machines this lack of reclaimable lowmem memory
186 can be fatal.
187
188 So the Linux page allocator has a mechanism which prevents allocations
189 which _could_ use highmem from using too much lowmem.  This means that
190 a certain amount of lowmem is defended from the possibility of being
191 captured into pinned user memory.
192
193 (The same argument applies to the old 16 megabyte ISA DMA region.  This
194 mechanism will also defend that region from allocations which could use
195 highmem or lowmem).
196
197 The `lowmem_reserve_ratio' tunable determines how aggressive the kernel is
198 in defending these lower zones.
199
200 If you have a machine which uses highmem or ISA DMA and your
201 applications are using mlock(), or if you are running with no swap then
202 you probably should change the lowmem_reserve_ratio setting.
203
204 The lowmem_reserve_ratio is an array. You can see them by reading this file.
205 -
206 % cat /proc/sys/vm/lowmem_reserve_ratio
207 256     256     32
208 -
209 Note: # of this elements is one fewer than number of zones. Because the highest
210       zone's value is not necessary for following calculation.
211
212 But, these values are not used directly. The kernel calculates # of protection
213 pages for each zones from them. These are shown as array of protection pages
214 in /proc/zoneinfo like followings. (This is an example of x86-64 box).
215 Each zone has an array of protection pages like this.
216
217 -
218 Node 0, zone      DMA
219   pages free     1355
220         min      3
221         low      3
222         high     4
223         :
224         :
225     numa_other   0
226         protection: (0, 2004, 2004, 2004)
227         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
228   pagesets
229     cpu: 0 pcp: 0
230         :
231 -
232 These protections are added to score to judge whether this zone should be used
233 for page allocation or should be reclaimed.
234
235 In this example, if normal pages (index=2) are required to this DMA zone and
236 watermark[WMARK_HIGH] is used for watermark, the kernel judges this zone should
237 not be used because pages_free(1355) is smaller than watermark + protection[2]
238 (4 + 2004 = 2008). If this protection value is 0, this zone would be used for
239 normal page requirement. If requirement is DMA zone(index=0), protection[0]
240 (=0) is used.
241
242 zone[i]'s protection[j] is calculated by following expression.
243
244 (i < j):
245   zone[i]->protection[j]
246   = (total sums of present_pages from zone[i+1] to zone[j] on the node)
247     / lowmem_reserve_ratio[i];
248 (i = j):
249    (should not be protected. = 0;
250 (i > j):
251    (not necessary, but looks 0)
252
253 The default values of lowmem_reserve_ratio[i] are
254     256 (if zone[i] means DMA or DMA32 zone)
255     32  (others).
256 As above expression, they are reciprocal number of ratio.
257 256 means 1/256. # of protection pages becomes about "0.39%" of total present
258 pages of higher zones on the node.
259
260 If you would like to protect more pages, smaller values are effective.
261 The minimum value is 1 (1/1 -> 100%).
262
263 ==============================================================
264
265 max_map_count:
266
267 This file contains the maximum number of memory map areas a process
268 may have. Memory map areas are used as a side-effect of calling
269 malloc, directly by mmap and mprotect, and also when loading shared
270 libraries.
271
272 While most applications need less than a thousand maps, certain
273 programs, particularly malloc debuggers, may consume lots of them,
274 e.g., up to one or two maps per allocation.
275
276 The default value is 65536.
277
278 ==============================================================
279
280 min_free_kbytes:
281
282 This is used to force the Linux VM to keep a minimum number
283 of kilobytes free.  The VM uses this number to compute a
284 watermark[WMARK_MIN] value for each lowmem zone in the system.
285 Each lowmem zone gets a number of reserved free pages based
286 proportionally on its size.
287
288 Some minimal amount of memory is needed to satisfy PF_MEMALLOC
289 allocations; if you set this to lower than 1024KB, your system will
290 become subtly broken, and prone to deadlock under high loads.
291
292 Setting this too high will OOM your machine instantly.
293
294 =============================================================
295
296 min_slab_ratio:
297
298 This is available only on NUMA kernels.
299
300 A percentage of the total pages in each zone.  On Zone reclaim
301 (fallback from the local zone occurs) slabs will be reclaimed if more
302 than this percentage of pages in a zone are reclaimable slab pages.
303 This insures that the slab growth stays under control even in NUMA
304 systems that rarely perform global reclaim.
305
306 The default is 5 percent.
307
308 Note that slab reclaim is triggered in a per zone / node fashion.
309 The process of reclaiming slab memory is currently not node specific
310 and may not be fast.
311
312 =============================================================
313
314 min_unmapped_ratio:
315
316 This is available only on NUMA kernels.
317
318 A percentage of the total pages in each zone.  Zone reclaim will only
319 occur if more than this percentage of pages are file backed and unmapped.
320 This is to insure that a minimal amount of local pages is still available for
321 file I/O even if the node is overallocated.
322
323 The default is 1 percent.
324
325 ==============================================================
326
327 mmap_min_addr
328
329 This file indicates the amount of address space  which a user process will
330 be restricted from mmaping.  Since kernel null dereference bugs could
331 accidentally operate based on the information in the first couple of pages
332 of memory userspace processes should not be allowed to write to them.  By
333 default this value is set to 0 and no protections will be enforced by the
334 security module.  Setting this value to something like 64k will allow the
335 vast majority of applications to work correctly and provide defense in depth
336 against future potential kernel bugs.
337
338 ==============================================================
339
340 nr_hugepages
341
342 Change the minimum size of the hugepage pool.
343
344 See Documentation/vm/hugetlbpage.txt
345
346 ==============================================================
347
348 nr_overcommit_hugepages
349
350 Change the maximum size of the hugepage pool. The maximum is
351 nr_hugepages + nr_overcommit_hugepages.
352
353 See Documentation/vm/hugetlbpage.txt
354
355 ==============================================================
356
357 nr_pdflush_threads
358
359 The current number of pdflush threads.  This value is read-only.
360 The value changes according to the number of dirty pages in the system.
361
362 When necessary, additional pdflush threads are created, one per second, up to
363 nr_pdflush_threads_max.
364
365 ==============================================================
366
367 nr_trim_pages
368
369 This is available only on NOMMU kernels.
370
371 This value adjusts the excess page trimming behaviour of power-of-2 aligned
372 NOMMU mmap allocations.
373
374 A value of 0 disables trimming of allocations entirely, while a value of 1
375 trims excess pages aggressively. Any value >= 1 acts as the watermark where
376 trimming of allocations is initiated.
377
378 The default value is 1.
379
380 See Documentation/nommu-mmap.txt for more information.
381
382 ==============================================================
383
384 numa_zonelist_order
385
386 This sysctl is only for NUMA.
387 'where the memory is allocated from' is controlled by zonelists.
388 (This documentation ignores ZONE_HIGHMEM/ZONE_DMA32 for simple explanation.
389  you may be able to read ZONE_DMA as ZONE_DMA32...)
390
391 In non-NUMA case, a zonelist for GFP_KERNEL is ordered as following.
392 ZONE_NORMAL -> ZONE_DMA
393 This means that a memory allocation request for GFP_KERNEL will
394 get memory from ZONE_DMA only when ZONE_NORMAL is not available.
395
396 In NUMA case, you can think of following 2 types of order.
397 Assume 2 node NUMA and below is zonelist of Node(0)'s GFP_KERNEL
398
399 (A) Node(0) ZONE_NORMAL -> Node(0) ZONE_DMA -> Node(1) ZONE_NORMAL
400 (B) Node(0) ZONE_NORMAL -> Node(1) ZONE_NORMAL -> Node(0) ZONE_DMA.
401
402 Type(A) offers the best locality for processes on Node(0), but ZONE_DMA
403 will be used before ZONE_NORMAL exhaustion. This increases possibility of
404 out-of-memory(OOM) of ZONE_DMA because ZONE_DMA is tend to be small.
405
406 Type(B) cannot offer the best locality but is more robust against OOM of
407 the DMA zone.
408
409 Type(A) is called as "Node" order. Type (B) is "Zone" order.
410
411 "Node order" orders the zonelists by node, then by zone within each node.
412 Specify "[Nn]ode" for zone order
413
414 "Zone Order" orders the zonelists by zone type, then by node within each
415 zone.  Specify "[Zz]one"for zode order.
416
417 Specify "[Dd]efault" to request automatic configuration.  Autoconfiguration
418 will select "node" order in following case.
419 (1) if the DMA zone does not exist or
420 (2) if the DMA zone comprises greater than 50% of the available memory or
421 (3) if any node's DMA zone comprises greater than 60% of its local memory and
422     the amount of local memory is big enough.
423
424 Otherwise, "zone" order will be selected. Default order is recommended unless
425 this is causing problems for your system/application.
426
427 ==============================================================
428
429 oom_dump_tasks
430
431 Enables a system-wide task dump (excluding kernel threads) to be
432 produced when the kernel performs an OOM-killing and includes such
433 information as pid, uid, tgid, vm size, rss, cpu, oom_adj score, and
434 name.  This is helpful to determine why the OOM killer was invoked
435 and to identify the rogue task that caused it.
436
437 If this is set to zero, this information is suppressed.  On very
438 large systems with thousands of tasks it may not be feasible to dump
439 the memory state information for each one.  Such systems should not
440 be forced to incur a performance penalty in OOM conditions when the
441 information may not be desired.
442
443 If this is set to non-zero, this information is shown whenever the
444 OOM killer actually kills a memory-hogging task.
445
446 The default value is 0.
447
448 ==============================================================
449
450 oom_kill_allocating_task
451
452 This enables or disables killing the OOM-triggering task in
453 out-of-memory situations.
454
455 If this is set to zero, the OOM killer will scan through the entire
456 tasklist and select a task based on heuristics to kill.  This normally
457 selects a rogue memory-hogging task that frees up a large amount of
458 memory when killed.
459
460 If this is set to non-zero, the OOM killer simply kills the task that
461 triggered the out-of-memory condition.  This avoids the expensive
462 tasklist scan.
463
464 If panic_on_oom is selected, it takes precedence over whatever value
465 is used in oom_kill_allocating_task.
466
467 The default value is 0.
468
469 ==============================================================
470
471 overcommit_memory:
472
473 This value contains a flag that enables memory overcommitment.
474
475 When this flag is 0, the kernel attempts to estimate the amount
476 of free memory left when userspace requests more memory.
477
478 When this flag is 1, the kernel pretends there is always enough
479 memory until it actually runs out.
480
481 When this flag is 2, the kernel uses a "never overcommit"
482 policy that attempts to prevent any overcommit of memory.
483
484 This feature can be very useful because there are a lot of
485 programs that malloc() huge amounts of memory "just-in-case"
486 and don't use much of it.
487
488 The default value is 0.
489
490 See Documentation/vm/overcommit-accounting and
491 security/commoncap.c::cap_vm_enough_memory() for more information.
492
493 ==============================================================
494
495 overcommit_ratio:
496
497 When overcommit_memory is set to 2, the committed address
498 space is not permitted to exceed swap plus this percentage
499 of physical RAM.  See above.
500
501 ==============================================================
502
503 page-cluster
504
505 page-cluster controls the number of pages which are written to swap in
506 a single attempt.  The swap I/O size.
507
508 It is a logarithmic value - setting it to zero means "1 page", setting
509 it to 1 means "2 pages", setting it to 2 means "4 pages", etc.
510
511 The default value is three (eight pages at a time).  There may be some
512 small benefits in tuning this to a different value if your workload is
513 swap-intensive.
514
515 =============================================================
516
517 panic_on_oom
518
519 This enables or disables panic on out-of-memory feature.
520
521 If this is set to 0, the kernel will kill some rogue process,
522 called oom_killer.  Usually, oom_killer can kill rogue processes and
523 system will survive.
524
525 If this is set to 1, the kernel panics when out-of-memory happens.
526 However, if a process limits using nodes by mempolicy/cpusets,
527 and those nodes become memory exhaustion status, one process
528 may be killed by oom-killer. No panic occurs in this case.
529 Because other nodes' memory may be free. This means system total status
530 may be not fatal yet.
531
532 If this is set to 2, the kernel panics compulsorily even on the
533 above-mentioned.
534
535 The default value is 0.
536 1 and 2 are for failover of clustering. Please select either
537 according to your policy of failover.
538
539 =============================================================
540
541 percpu_pagelist_fraction
542
543 This is the fraction of pages at most (high mark pcp->high) in each zone that
544 are allocated for each per cpu page list.  The min value for this is 8.  It
545 means that we don't allow more than 1/8th of pages in each zone to be
546 allocated in any single per_cpu_pagelist.  This entry only changes the value
547 of hot per cpu pagelists.  User can specify a number like 100 to allocate
548 1/100th of each zone to each per cpu page list.
549
550 The batch value of each per cpu pagelist is also updated as a result.  It is
551 set to pcp->high/4.  The upper limit of batch is (PAGE_SHIFT * 8)
552
553 The initial value is zero.  Kernel does not use this value at boot time to set
554 the high water marks for each per cpu page list.
555
556 ==============================================================
557
558 stat_interval
559
560 The time interval between which vm statistics are updated.  The default
561 is 1 second.
562
563 ==============================================================
564
565 swappiness
566
567 This control is used to define how aggressive the kernel will swap
568 memory pages.  Higher values will increase agressiveness, lower values
569 decrease the amount of swap.
570
571 The default value is 60.
572
573 ==============================================================
574
575 vfs_cache_pressure
576 ------------------
577
578 Controls the tendency of the kernel to reclaim the memory which is used for
579 caching of directory and inode objects.
580
581 At the default value of vfs_cache_pressure=100 the kernel will attempt to
582 reclaim dentries and inodes at a "fair" rate with respect to pagecache and
583 swapcache reclaim.  Decreasing vfs_cache_pressure causes the kernel to prefer
584 to retain dentry and inode caches.  Increasing vfs_cache_pressure beyond 100
585 causes the kernel to prefer to reclaim dentries and inodes.
586
587 ==============================================================
588
589 zone_reclaim_mode:
590
591 Zone_reclaim_mode allows someone to set more or less aggressive approaches to
592 reclaim memory when a zone runs out of memory. If it is set to zero then no
593 zone reclaim occurs. Allocations will be satisfied from other zones / nodes
594 in the system.
595
596 This is value ORed together of
597
598 1       = Zone reclaim on
599 2       = Zone reclaim writes dirty pages out
600 4       = Zone reclaim swaps pages
601
602 zone_reclaim_mode is set during bootup to 1 if it is determined that pages
603 from remote zones will cause a measurable performance reduction. The
604 page allocator will then reclaim easily reusable pages (those page
605 cache pages that are currently not used) before allocating off node pages.
606
607 It may be beneficial to switch off zone reclaim if the system is
608 used for a file server and all of memory should be used for caching files
609 from disk. In that case the caching effect is more important than
610 data locality.
611
612 Allowing zone reclaim to write out pages stops processes that are
613 writing large amounts of data from dirtying pages on other nodes. Zone
614 reclaim will write out dirty pages if a zone fills up and so effectively
615 throttle the process. This may decrease the performance of a single process
616 since it cannot use all of system memory to buffer the outgoing writes
617 anymore but it preserve the memory on other nodes so that the performance
618 of other processes running on other nodes will not be affected.
619
620 Allowing regular swap effectively restricts allocations to the local
621 node unless explicitly overridden by memory policies or cpuset
622 configurations.
623
624 ============ End of Document =================================