[PATCH] grab swap token reordered
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / sched-stats.txt
1 Version 10 of schedstats includes support for sched_domains, which
2 hit the mainline kernel in 2.6.7.  Some counters make more sense to be
3 per-runqueue; other to be per-domain.  Note that domains (and their associated
4 information) will only be pertinent and available on machines utilizing
5 CONFIG_SMP.
6
7 In version 10 of schedstat, there is at least one level of domain
8 statistics for each cpu listed, and there may well be more than one
9 domain.  Domains have no particular names in this implementation, but
10 the highest numbered one typically arbitrates balancing across all the
11 cpus on the machine, while domain0 is the most tightly focused domain,
12 sometimes balancing only between pairs of cpus.  At this time, there
13 are no architectures which need more than three domain levels. The first
14 field in the domain stats is a bit map indicating which cpus are affected
15 by that domain.
16
17 These fields are counters, and only increment.  Programs which make use
18 of these will need to start with a baseline observation and then calculate
19 the change in the counters at each subsequent observation.  A perl script
20 which does this for many of the fields is available at
21
22     http://eaglet.rain.com/rick/linux/schedstat/
23
24 Note that any such script will necessarily be version-specific, as the main
25 reason to change versions is changes in the output format.  For those wishing
26 to write their own scripts, the fields are described here.
27
28 CPU statistics
29 --------------
30 cpu<N> 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
31
32 NOTE: In the sched_yield() statistics, the active queue is considered empty
33     if it has only one process in it, since obviously the process calling
34     sched_yield() is that process.
35
36 First four fields are sched_yield() statistics:
37      1) # of times both the active and the expired queue were empty
38      2) # of times just the active queue was empty
39      3) # of times just the expired queue was empty
40      4) # of times sched_yield() was called
41
42 Next four are schedule() statistics:
43      5) # of times the active queue had at least one other process on it
44      6) # of times we switched to the expired queue and reused it
45      7) # of times schedule() was called
46      8) # of times schedule() left the processor idle
47
48 Next four are active_load_balance() statistics:
49      9) # of times active_load_balance() was called
50     10) # of times active_load_balance() caused this cpu to gain a task
51     11) # of times active_load_balance() caused this cpu to lose a task
52     12) # of times active_load_balance() tried to move a task and failed
53
54 Next three are try_to_wake_up() statistics:
55     13) # of times try_to_wake_up() was called
56     14) # of times try_to_wake_up() successfully moved the awakening task
57     15) # of times try_to_wake_up() attempted to move the awakening task
58
59 Next two are wake_up_new_task() statistics:
60     16) # of times wake_up_new_task() was called
61     17) # of times wake_up_new_task() successfully moved the new task
62
63 Next one is a sched_migrate_task() statistic:
64     18) # of times sched_migrate_task() was called
65
66 Next one is a sched_balance_exec() statistic:
67     19) # of times sched_balance_exec() was called
68
69 Next three are statistics describing scheduling latency:
70     20) sum of all time spent running by tasks on this processor (in ms)
71     21) sum of all time spent waiting to run by tasks on this processor (in ms)
72     22) # of tasks (not necessarily unique) given to the processor
73
74 The last six are statistics dealing with pull_task():
75     23) # of times pull_task() moved a task to this cpu when newly idle
76     24) # of times pull_task() stole a task from this cpu when another cpu
77         was newly idle
78     25) # of times pull_task() moved a task to this cpu when idle
79     26) # of times pull_task() stole a task from this cpu when another cpu
80         was idle
81     27) # of times pull_task() moved a task to this cpu when busy
82     28) # of times pull_task() stole a task from this cpu when another cpu
83         was busy
84
85
86 Domain statistics
87 -----------------
88 One of these is produced per domain for each cpu described. (Note that if
89 CONFIG_SMP is not defined, *no* domains are utilized and these lines
90 will not appear in the output.)
91
92 domain<N> 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
93
94 The first field is a bit mask indicating what cpus this domain operates over.
95
96 The next fifteen are a variety of load_balance() statistics:
97
98      1) # of times in this domain load_balance() was called when the cpu
99         was idle
100      2) # of times in this domain load_balance() was called when the cpu
101         was busy
102      3) # of times in this domain load_balance() was called when the cpu
103         was just becoming idle
104      4) # of times in this domain load_balance() tried to move one or more
105         tasks and failed, when the cpu was idle
106      5) # of times in this domain load_balance() tried to move one or more
107         tasks and failed, when the cpu was busy
108      6) # of times in this domain load_balance() tried to move one or more
109         tasks and failed, when the cpu was just becoming idle
110      7) sum of imbalances discovered (if any) with each call to
111         load_balance() in this domain when the cpu was idle
112      8) sum of imbalances discovered (if any) with each call to
113         load_balance() in this domain when the cpu was busy
114      9) sum of imbalances discovered (if any) with each call to
115         load_balance() in this domain when the cpu was just becoming idle
116     10) # of times in this domain load_balance() was called but did not find
117         a busier queue while the cpu was idle
118     11) # of times in this domain load_balance() was called but did not find
119         a busier queue while the cpu was busy
120     12) # of times in this domain load_balance() was called but did not find
121         a busier queue while the cpu was just becoming idle
122     13) # of times in this domain a busier queue was found while the cpu was
123         idle but no busier group was found
124     14) # of times in this domain a busier queue was found while the cpu was
125         busy but no busier group was found
126     15) # of times in this domain a busier queue was found while the cpu was
127         just becoming idle but no busier group was found
128
129 Next two are sched_balance_exec() statistics:
130     17) # of times in this domain sched_balance_exec() successfully pushed
131         a task to a new cpu
132     18) # of times in this domain sched_balance_exec() tried but failed to
133         push a task to a new cpu
134
135 Next two are try_to_wake_up() statistics:
136     19) # of times in this domain try_to_wake_up() tried to move a task based
137         on affinity and cache warmth
138     20) # of times in this domain try_to_wake_up() tried to move a task based
139         on load balancing
140
141
142 /proc/<pid>/schedstat
143 ----------------
144 schedstats also adds a new /proc/<pid/schedstat file to include some of
145 the same information on a per-process level.  There are three fields in
146 this file correlating to fields 20, 21, and 22 in the CPU fields, but
147 they only apply for that process.
148
149 A program could be easily written to make use of these extra fields to
150 report on how well a particular process or set of processes is faring
151 under the scheduler's policies.  A simple version of such a program is
152 available at
153     http://eaglet.rain.com/rick/linux/schedstat/v10/latency.c