09dd510c4a5fef1ecff21d79ad0d961b3cd864d1
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / gpio.txt
1 GPIO Interfaces
2
3 This provides an overview of GPIO access conventions on Linux.
4
5
6 What is a GPIO?
7 ===============
8 A "General Purpose Input/Output" (GPIO) is a flexible software-controlled
9 digital signal.  They are provided from many kinds of chip, and are familiar
10 to Linux developers working with embedded and custom hardware.  Each GPIO
11 represents a bit connected to a particular pin, or "ball" on Ball Grid Array
12 (BGA) packages.  Board schematics show which external hardware connects to
13 which GPIOs.  Drivers can be written generically, so that board setup code
14 passes such pin configuration data to drivers.
15
16 System-on-Chip (SOC) processors heavily rely on GPIOs.  In some cases, every
17 non-dedicated pin can be configured as a GPIO; and most chips have at least
18 several dozen of them.  Programmable logic devices (like FPGAs) can easily
19 provide GPIOs; multifunction chips like power managers, and audio codecs
20 often have a few such pins to help with pin scarcity on SOCs; and there are
21 also "GPIO Expander" chips that connect using the I2C or SPI serial busses.
22 Most PC southbridges have a few dozen GPIO-capable pins (with only the BIOS
23 firmware knowing how they're used).
24
25 The exact capabilities of GPIOs vary between systems.  Common options:
26
27   - Output values are writable (high=1, low=0).  Some chips also have
28     options about how that value is driven, so that for example only one
29     value might be driven ... supporting "wire-OR" and similar schemes
30     for the other value.
31
32   - Input values are likewise readable (1, 0).  Some chips support readback
33     of pins configured as "output", which is very useful in such "wire-OR"
34     cases (to support bidirectional signaling).  GPIO controllers may have
35     input de-glitch logic, sometimes with software controls.
36
37   - Inputs can often be used as IRQ signals, often edge triggered but
38     sometimes level triggered.  Such IRQs may be configurable as system
39     wakeup events, to wake the system from a low power state.
40
41   - Usually a GPIO will be configurable as either input or output, as needed
42     by different product boards; single direction ones exist too.
43
44   - Most GPIOs can be accessed while holding spinlocks, but those accessed
45     through a serial bus normally can't.  Some systems support both types.
46
47 On a given board each GPIO is used for one specific purpose like monitoring
48 MMC/SD card insertion/removal, detecting card writeprotect status, driving
49 a LED, configuring a transceiver, bitbanging a serial bus, poking a hardware
50 watchdog, sensing a switch, and so on.
51
52
53 GPIO conventions
54 ================
55 Note that this is called a "convention" because you don't need to do it this
56 way, and it's no crime if you don't.  There **are** cases where portability
57 is not the main issue; GPIOs are often used for the kind of board-specific
58 glue logic that may even change between board revisions, and can't ever be
59 used on a board that's wired differently.  Only least-common-denominator
60 functionality can be very portable.  Other features are platform-specific,
61 and that can be critical for glue logic.
62
63 Plus, this doesn't define an implementation framework, just an interface.
64 One platform might implement it as simple inline functions accessing chip
65 registers; another might implement it by delegating through abstractions
66 used for several very different kinds of GPIO controller.
67
68 That said, if the convention is supported on their platform, drivers should
69 use it when possible:
70
71         #include <asm/gpio.h>
72
73 If you stick to this convention then it'll be easier for other developers to
74 see what your code is doing, and help maintain it.
75
76
77 Identifying GPIOs
78 -----------------
79 GPIOs are identified by unsigned integers in the range 0..MAX_INT.  That
80 reserves "negative" numbers for other purposes like marking signals as
81 "not available on this board", or indicating faults.
82
83 Platforms define how they use those integers, and usually #define symbols
84 for the GPIO lines so that board-specific setup code directly corresponds
85 to the relevant schematics.  In contrast, drivers should only use GPIO
86 numbers passed to them from that setup code, using platform_data to hold
87 board-specific pin configuration data (along with other board specific
88 data they need).  That avoids portability problems.
89
90 So for example one platform uses numbers 32-159 for GPIOs; while another
91 uses numbers 0..63 with one set of GPIO controllers, 64-79 with another
92 type of GPIO controller, and on one particular board 80-95 with an FPGA.
93 The numbers need not be contiguous; either of those platforms could also
94 use numbers 2000-2063 to identify GPIOs in a bank of I2C GPIO expanders.
95
96 Whether a platform supports multiple GPIO controllers is currently a
97 platform-specific implementation issue.
98
99
100 Using GPIOs
101 -----------
102 One of the first things to do with a GPIO, often in board setup code when
103 setting up a platform_device using the GPIO, is mark its direction:
104
105         /* set as input or output, returning 0 or negative errno */
106         int gpio_direction_input(unsigned gpio);
107         int gpio_direction_output(unsigned gpio);
108
109 The return value is zero for success, else a negative errno.  It should
110 be checked, since the get/set calls don't have error returns and since
111 misconfiguration is possible.  (These calls could sleep.)
112
113 Setting the direction can fail if the GPIO number is invalid, or when
114 that particular GPIO can't be used in that mode.  It's generally a bad
115 idea to rely on boot firmware to have set the direction correctly, since
116 it probably wasn't validated to do more than boot Linux.  (Similarly,
117 that board setup code probably needs to multiplex that pin as a GPIO,
118 and configure pullups/pulldowns appropriately.)
119
120
121 Spinlock-Safe GPIO access
122 -------------------------
123 Most GPIO controllers can be accessed with memory read/write instructions.
124 That doesn't need to sleep, and can safely be done from inside IRQ handlers.
125
126 Use these calls to access such GPIOs:
127
128         /* GPIO INPUT:  return zero or nonzero */
129         int gpio_get_value(unsigned gpio);
130
131         /* GPIO OUTPUT */
132         void gpio_set_value(unsigned gpio, int value);
133
134 The values are boolean, zero for low, nonzero for high.  When reading the
135 value of an output pin, the value returned should be what's seen on the
136 pin ... that won't always match the specified output value, because of
137 issues including wire-OR and output latencies.
138
139 The get/set calls have no error returns because "invalid GPIO" should have
140 been reported earlier in gpio_set_direction().  However, note that not all
141 platforms can read the value of output pins; those that can't should always
142 return zero.  Also, these calls will be ignored for GPIOs that can't safely
143 be accessed wihtout sleeping (see below).
144
145 Platform-specific implementations are encouraged to optimise the two
146 calls to access the GPIO value in cases where the GPIO number (and for
147 output, value) are constant.  It's normal for them to need only a couple
148 of instructions in such cases (reading or writing a hardware register),
149 and not to need spinlocks.  Such optimized calls can make bitbanging
150 applications a lot more efficient (in both space and time) than spending
151 dozens of instructions on subroutine calls.
152
153
154 GPIO access that may sleep
155 --------------------------
156 Some GPIO controllers must be accessed using message based busses like I2C
157 or SPI.  Commands to read or write those GPIO values require waiting to
158 get to the head of a queue to transmit a command and get its response.
159 This requires sleeping, which can't be done from inside IRQ handlers.
160
161 Platforms that support this type of GPIO distinguish them from other GPIOs
162 by returning nonzero from this call:
163
164         int gpio_cansleep(unsigned gpio);
165
166 To access such GPIOs, a different set of accessors is defined:
167
168         /* GPIO INPUT:  return zero or nonzero, might sleep */
169         int gpio_get_value_cansleep(unsigned gpio);
170
171         /* GPIO OUTPUT, might sleep */
172         void gpio_set_value_cansleep(unsigned gpio, int value);
173
174 Other than the fact that these calls might sleep, and will not be ignored
175 for GPIOs that can't be accessed from IRQ handlers, these calls act the
176 same as the spinlock-safe calls.
177
178
179 Claiming and Releasing GPIOs (OPTIONAL)
180 ---------------------------------------
181 To help catch system configuration errors, two calls are defined.
182 However, many platforms don't currently support this mechanism.
183
184         /* request GPIO, returning 0 or negative errno.
185          * non-null labels may be useful for diagnostics.
186          */
187         int gpio_request(unsigned gpio, const char *label);
188
189         /* release previously-claimed GPIO */
190         void gpio_free(unsigned gpio);
191
192 Passing invalid GPIO numbers to gpio_request() will fail, as will requesting
193 GPIOs that have already been claimed with that call.  The return value of
194 gpio_request() must be checked.  (These calls could sleep.)
195
196 These calls serve two basic purposes.  One is marking the signals which
197 are actually in use as GPIOs, for better diagnostics; systems may have
198 several hundred potential GPIOs, but often only a dozen are used on any
199 given board.  Another is to catch conflicts between drivers, reporting
200 errors when drivers wrongly think they have exclusive use of that signal.
201
202 These two calls are optional because not not all current Linux platforms
203 offer such functionality in their GPIO support; a valid implementation
204 could return success for all gpio_request() calls.  Unlike the other calls,
205 the state they represent doesn't normally match anything from a hardware
206 register; it's just a software bitmap which clearly is not necessary for
207 correct operation of hardware or (bug free) drivers.
208
209 Note that requesting a GPIO does NOT cause it to be configured in any
210 way; it just marks that GPIO as in use.  Separate code must handle any
211 pin setup (e.g. controlling which pin the GPIO uses, pullup/pulldown).
212
213
214 GPIOs mapped to IRQs
215 --------------------
216 GPIO numbers are unsigned integers; so are IRQ numbers.  These make up
217 two logically distinct namespaces (GPIO 0 need not use IRQ 0).  You can
218 map between them using calls like:
219
220         /* map GPIO numbers to IRQ numbers */
221         int gpio_to_irq(unsigned gpio);
222
223         /* map IRQ numbers to GPIO numbers */
224         int irq_to_gpio(unsigned irq);
225
226 Those return either the corresponding number in the other namespace, or
227 else a negative errno code if the mapping can't be done.  (For example,
228 some GPIOs can't used as IRQs.)  It is an unchecked error to use a GPIO
229 number that hasn't been marked as an input using gpio_set_direction(), or
230 to use an IRQ number that didn't originally come from gpio_to_irq().
231
232 These two mapping calls are expected to cost on the order of a single
233 addition or subtraction.  They're not allowed to sleep.
234
235 Non-error values returned from gpio_to_irq() can be passed to request_irq()
236 or free_irq().  They will often be stored into IRQ resources for platform
237 devices, by the board-specific initialization code.  Note that IRQ trigger
238 options are part of the IRQ interface, e.g. IRQF_TRIGGER_FALLING, as are
239 system wakeup capabilities.
240
241 Non-error values returned from irq_to_gpio() would most commonly be used
242 with gpio_get_value().
243
244
245
246 What do these conventions omit?
247 ===============================
248 One of the biggest things these conventions omit is pin multiplexing, since
249 this is highly chip-specific and nonportable.  One platform might not need
250 explicit multiplexing; another might have just two options for use of any
251 given pin; another might have eight options per pin; another might be able
252 to route a given GPIO to any one of several pins.  (Yes, those examples all
253 come from systems that run Linux today.)
254
255 Related to multiplexing is configuration and enabling of the pullups or
256 pulldowns integrated on some platforms.  Not all platforms support them,
257 or support them in the same way; and any given board might use external
258 pullups (or pulldowns) so that the on-chip ones should not be used.
259
260 There are other system-specific mechanisms that are not specified here,
261 like the aforementioned options for input de-glitching and wire-OR output.
262 Hardware may support reading or writing GPIOs in gangs, but that's usually
263 configuration dependednt:  for GPIOs sharing the same bank.  (GPIOs are
264 commonly grouped in banks of 16 or 32, with a given SOC having several such
265 banks.)  Code relying on such mechanisms will necessarily be nonportable.
266
267 Dynamic definition of GPIOs is not currently supported; for example, as
268 a side effect of configuring an add-on board with some GPIO expanders.
269
270 These calls are purely for kernel space, but a userspace API could be built
271 on top of it.