Linux-2.6.12-rc2
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / arm / SA1100 / Assabet
1 The Intel Assabet (SA-1110 evaluation) board
2 ============================================
3
4 Please see:
5 http://developer.intel.com/design/strong/quicklist/eval-plat/sa-1110.htm
6 http://developer.intel.com/design/strong/guides/278278.htm
7
8 Also some notes from John G Dorsey <jd5q@andrew.cmu.edu>:
9 http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~wearable/software/assabet.html
10
11
12 Building the kernel
13 -------------------
14
15 To build the kernel with current defaults:
16
17         make assabet_config
18         make oldconfig
19         make zImage
20
21 The resulting kernel image should be available in linux/arch/arm/boot/zImage.
22
23
24 Installing a bootloader
25 -----------------------
26
27 A couple of bootloaders able to boot Linux on Assabet are available:
28
29 BLOB (http://www.lart.tudelft.nl/lartware/blob/)
30
31    BLOB is a bootloader used within the LART project.  Some contributed
32    patches were merged into BLOB to add support for Assabet.
33
34 Compaq's Bootldr + John Dorsey's patch for Assabet support
35 (http://www.handhelds.org/Compaq/bootldr.html)
36 (http://www.wearablegroup.org/software/bootldr/)
37
38    Bootldr is the bootloader developed by Compaq for the iPAQ Pocket PC.
39    John Dorsey has produced add-on patches to add support for Assabet and
40    the JFFS filesystem.
41
42 RedBoot (http://sources.redhat.com/redboot/)
43
44    RedBoot is a bootloader developed by Red Hat based on the eCos RTOS
45    hardware abstraction layer.  It supports Assabet amongst many other
46    hardware platforms.
47
48 RedBoot is currently the recommended choice since it's the only one to have
49 networking support, and is the most actively maintained.
50
51 Brief examples on how to boot Linux with RedBoot are shown below.  But first
52 you need to have RedBoot installed in your flash memory.  A known to work
53 precompiled RedBoot binary is available from the following location:
54
55 ftp://ftp.netwinder.org/users/n/nico/
56 ftp://ftp.arm.linux.org.uk/pub/linux/arm/people/nico/
57 ftp://ftp.handhelds.org/pub/linux/arm/sa-1100-patches/
58
59 Look for redboot-assabet*.tgz.  Some installation infos are provided in
60 redboot-assabet*.txt.
61
62
63 Initial RedBoot configuration
64 -----------------------------
65
66 The commands used here are explained in The RedBoot User's Guide available
67 on-line at http://sources.redhat.com/ecos/docs-latest/redboot/redboot.html.
68 Please refer to it for explanations.
69
70 If you have a CF network card (my Assabet kit contained a CF+ LP-E from
71 Socket Communications Inc.), you should strongly consider using it for TFTP
72 file transfers.  You must insert it before RedBoot runs since it can't detect
73 it dynamically.
74
75 To initialize the flash directory:
76
77         fis init -f
78
79 To initialize the non-volatile settings, like whether you want to use BOOTP or
80 a static IP address, etc, use this command:
81
82         fconfig -i
83
84
85 Writing a kernel image into flash
86 ---------------------------------
87
88 First, the kernel image must be loaded into RAM.  If you have the zImage file
89 available on a TFTP server:
90
91         load zImage -r -b 0x100000
92
93 If you rather want to use Y-Modem upload over the serial port:
94
95         load -m ymodem -r -b 0x100000
96
97 To write it to flash:
98
99         fis create "Linux kernel" -b 0x100000 -l 0xc0000
100
101
102 Booting the kernel
103 ------------------
104
105 The kernel still requires a filesystem to boot.  A ramdisk image can be loaded
106 as follows:
107
108         load ramdisk_image.gz -r -b 0x800000
109
110 Again, Y-Modem upload can be used instead of TFTP by replacing the file name
111 by '-y ymodem'.
112
113 Now the kernel can be retrieved from flash like this:
114
115         fis load "Linux kernel"
116
117 or loaded as described previously.  To boot the kernel:
118
119         exec -b 0x100000 -l 0xc0000
120
121 The ramdisk image could be stored into flash as well, but there are better
122 solutions for on-flash filesystems as mentioned below.
123
124
125 Using JFFS2
126 -----------
127
128 Using JFFS2 (the Second Journalling Flash File System) is probably the most
129 convenient way to store a writable filesystem into flash.  JFFS2 is used in
130 conjunction with the MTD layer which is responsible for low-level flash
131 management.  More information on the Linux MTD can be found on-line at:
132 http://www.linux-mtd.infradead.org/.  A JFFS howto with some infos about
133 creating JFFS/JFFS2 images is available from the same site.
134
135 For instance, a sample JFFS2 image can be retrieved from the same FTP sites
136 mentioned below for the precompiled RedBoot image.
137
138 To load this file:
139
140         load sample_img.jffs2 -r -b 0x100000
141
142 The result should look like:
143
144 RedBoot> load sample_img.jffs2 -r -b 0x100000
145 Raw file loaded 0x00100000-0x00377424
146
147 Now we must know the size of the unallocated flash:
148
149         fis free
150
151 Result:
152
153 RedBoot> fis free
154   0x500E0000 .. 0x503C0000
155
156 The values above may be different depending on the size of the filesystem and
157 the type of flash.  See their usage below as an example and take care of
158 substituting yours appropriately.
159
160 We must determine some values:
161
162 size of unallocated flash:      0x503c0000 - 0x500e0000 = 0x2e0000
163 size of the filesystem image:   0x00377424 - 0x00100000 = 0x277424
164
165 We want to fit the filesystem image of course, but we also want to give it all
166 the remaining flash space as well.  To write it:
167
168         fis unlock -f 0x500E0000 -l 0x2e0000
169         fis erase -f 0x500E0000 -l 0x2e0000
170         fis write -b 0x100000 -l 0x277424 -f 0x500E0000
171         fis create "JFFS2" -n -f 0x500E0000 -l 0x2e0000
172
173 Now the filesystem is associated to a MTD "partition" once Linux has discovered
174 what they are in the boot process.  From Redboot, the 'fis list' command
175 displays them:
176
177 RedBoot> fis list
178 Name              FLASH addr  Mem addr    Length      Entry point
179 RedBoot           0x50000000  0x50000000  0x00020000  0x00000000
180 RedBoot config    0x503C0000  0x503C0000  0x00020000  0x00000000
181 FIS directory     0x503E0000  0x503E0000  0x00020000  0x00000000
182 Linux kernel      0x50020000  0x00100000  0x000C0000  0x00000000
183 JFFS2             0x500E0000  0x500E0000  0x002E0000  0x00000000
184
185 However Linux should display something like:
186
187 SA1100 flash: probing 32-bit flash bus
188 SA1100 flash: Found 2 x16 devices at 0x0 in 32-bit mode
189 Using RedBoot partition definition
190 Creating 5 MTD partitions on "SA1100 flash":
191 0x00000000-0x00020000 : "RedBoot"
192 0x00020000-0x000e0000 : "Linux kernel"
193 0x000e0000-0x003c0000 : "JFFS2"
194 0x003c0000-0x003e0000 : "RedBoot config"
195 0x003e0000-0x00400000 : "FIS directory"
196
197 What's important here is the position of the partition we are interested in,
198 which is the third one.  Within Linux, this correspond to /dev/mtdblock2.
199 Therefore to boot Linux with the kernel and its root filesystem in flash, we
200 need this RedBoot command:
201
202         fis load "Linux kernel"
203         exec -b 0x100000 -l 0xc0000 -c "root=/dev/mtdblock2"
204
205 Of course other filesystems than JFFS might be used, like cramfs for example.
206 You might want to boot with a root filesystem over NFS, etc.  It is also
207 possible, and sometimes more convenient, to flash a filesystem directly from
208 within Linux while booted from a ramdisk or NFS.  The Linux MTD repository has
209 many tools to deal with flash memory as well, to erase it for example.  JFFS2
210 can then be mounted directly on a freshly erased partition and files can be
211 copied over directly.  Etc...
212
213
214 RedBoot scripting
215 -----------------
216
217 All the commands above aren't so useful if they have to be typed in every
218 time the Assabet is rebooted.  Therefore it's possible to automatize the boot
219 process using RedBoot's scripting capability.
220
221 For example, I use this to boot Linux with both the kernel and the ramdisk
222 images retrieved from a TFTP server on the network:
223
224 RedBoot> fconfig
225 Run script at boot: false true
226 Boot script:
227 Enter script, terminate with empty line
228 >> load zImage -r -b 0x100000
229 >> load ramdisk_ks.gz -r -b 0x800000
230 >> exec -b 0x100000 -l 0xc0000
231 >>
232 Boot script timeout (1000ms resolution): 3
233 Use BOOTP for network configuration: true
234 GDB connection port: 9000
235 Network debug at boot time: false
236 Update RedBoot non-volatile configuration - are you sure (y/n)? y
237
238 Then, rebooting the Assabet is just a matter of waiting for the login prompt.
239
240
241
242 Nicolas Pitre
243 nico@cam.org
244 June 12, 2001
245
246
247 Status of peripherals in -rmk tree (updated 14/10/2001)
248 -------------------------------------------------------
249
250 Assabet:
251  Serial ports:
252   Radio:                TX, RX, CTS, DSR, DCD, RI
253    PM:                  Not tested.
254   COM:                  TX, RX, CTS, DSR, DCD, RTS, DTR, PM
255    PM:                  Not tested.
256   I2C:                  Implemented, not fully tested.
257   L3:                   Fully tested, pass.
258    PM:                  Not tested.
259
260  Video:
261   LCD:                  Fully tested.  PM
262                         (LCD doesn't like being blanked with
263                          neponset connected)
264   Video out:            Not fully
265
266  Audio:
267   UDA1341:
268    Playback:            Fully tested, pass.
269    Record:              Implemented, not tested.
270    PM:                  Not tested.
271
272   UCB1200:
273    Audio play:          Implemented, not heavily tested.
274    Audio rec:           Implemented, not heavily tested.
275    Telco audio play:    Implemented, not heavily tested.
276    Telco audio rec:     Implemented, not heavily tested.
277    POTS control:        No
278    Touchscreen:         Yes
279    PM:                  Not tested.
280
281  Other:
282   PCMCIA:
283    LPE:                 Fully tested, pass.
284   USB:                  No
285   IRDA:
286    SIR:                 Fully tested, pass.
287    FIR:                 Fully tested, pass.
288    PM:                  Not tested.
289
290 Neponset:
291  Serial ports:
292   COM1,2:       TX, RX, CTS, DSR, DCD, RTS, DTR
293    PM:                  Not tested.
294   USB:                  Implemented, not heavily tested.
295   PCMCIA:               Implemented, not heavily tested.
296    PM:                  Not tested.
297   CF:                   Implemented, not heavily tested.
298    PM:                  Not tested.
299
300 More stuff can be found in the -np (Nicolas Pitre's) tree.
301