5f3bedaf8e35e90dfc92b2cebee16f6caa025986
[linux-2.6.git] / Documentation / ABI / testing / sysfs-block
1 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/stat
2 Date:           February 2008
3 Contact:        Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com>
4 Description:
5                 The /sys/block/<disk>/stat files displays the I/O
6                 statistics of disk <disk>. They contain 11 fields:
7                  1 - reads completed succesfully
8                  2 - reads merged
9                  3 - sectors read
10                  4 - time spent reading (ms)
11                  5 - writes completed
12                  6 - writes merged
13                  7 - sectors written
14                  8 - time spent writing (ms)
15                  9 - I/Os currently in progress
16                 10 - time spent doing I/Os (ms)
17                 11 - weighted time spent doing I/Os (ms)
18                 For more details refer Documentation/iostats.txt
19
20
21 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/<part>/stat
22 Date:           February 2008
23 Contact:        Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com>
24 Description:
25                 The /sys/block/<disk>/<part>/stat files display the
26                 I/O statistics of partition <part>. The format is the
27                 same as the above-written /sys/block/<disk>/stat
28                 format.
29
30
31 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/integrity/format
32 Date:           June 2008
33 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
34 Description:
35                 Metadata format for integrity capable block device.
36                 E.g. T10-DIF-TYPE1-CRC.
37
38
39 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/integrity/read_verify
40 Date:           June 2008
41 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
42 Description:
43                 Indicates whether the block layer should verify the
44                 integrity of read requests serviced by devices that
45                 support sending integrity metadata.
46
47
48 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/integrity/tag_size
49 Date:           June 2008
50 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
51 Description:
52                 Number of bytes of integrity tag space available per
53                 512 bytes of data.
54
55
56 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/integrity/write_generate
57 Date:           June 2008
58 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
59 Description:
60                 Indicates whether the block layer should automatically
61                 generate checksums for write requests bound for
62                 devices that support receiving integrity metadata.
63
64 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/alignment_offset
65 Date:           April 2009
66 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
67 Description:
68                 Storage devices may report a physical block size that is
69                 bigger than the logical block size (for instance a drive
70                 with 4KB physical sectors exposing 512-byte logical
71                 blocks to the operating system).  This parameter
72                 indicates how many bytes the beginning of the device is
73                 offset from the disk's natural alignment.
74
75 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/<partition>/alignment_offset
76 Date:           April 2009
77 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
78 Description:
79                 Storage devices may report a physical block size that is
80                 bigger than the logical block size (for instance a drive
81                 with 4KB physical sectors exposing 512-byte logical
82                 blocks to the operating system).  This parameter
83                 indicates how many bytes the beginning of the partition
84                 is offset from the disk's natural alignment.
85
86 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/queue/logical_block_size
87 Date:           May 2009
88 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
89 Description:
90                 This is the smallest unit the storage device can
91                 address.  It is typically 512 bytes.
92
93 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/queue/physical_block_size
94 Date:           May 2009
95 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
96 Description:
97                 This is the smallest unit a physical storage device can
98                 write atomically.  It is usually the same as the logical
99                 block size but may be bigger.  One example is SATA
100                 drives with 4KB sectors that expose a 512-byte logical
101                 block size to the operating system.  For stacked block
102                 devices the physical_block_size variable contains the
103                 maximum physical_block_size of the component devices.
104
105 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/queue/minimum_io_size
106 Date:           April 2009
107 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
108 Description:
109                 Storage devices may report a granularity or preferred
110                 minimum I/O size which is the smallest request the
111                 device can perform without incurring a performance
112                 penalty.  For disk drives this is often the physical
113                 block size.  For RAID arrays it is often the stripe
114                 chunk size.  A properly aligned multiple of
115                 minimum_io_size is the preferred request size for
116                 workloads where a high number of I/O operations is
117                 desired.
118
119 What:           /sys/block/<disk>/queue/optimal_io_size
120 Date:           April 2009
121 Contact:        Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
122 Description:
123                 Storage devices may report an optimal I/O size, which is
124                 the device's preferred unit for sustained I/O.  This is
125                 rarely reported for disk drives.  For RAID arrays it is
126                 usually the stripe width or the internal track size.  A
127                 properly aligned multiple of optimal_io_size is the
128                 preferred request size for workloads where sustained
129                 throughput is desired.  If no optimal I/O size is
130                 reported this file contains 0.